Connect with us

National

Record LGBT Hate Violence in 2017

Coalition Denounces Hostile Climate in Latest “Crisis of Hate” Report

Published

on

Beverly Tillery, Executive Director of Anti-Violence Project, addresses a crowd in New York City. (Photo courtesy AVP)

Never in its 22-year history has it been this dire, this dangerous, to be LGBT, says the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs in its latest report. On Monday, Jan. 22, the group released its annual national research report, detailing 52 cases in 2017 in which members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and HIV-affected communities were targeted and killed for who they were.

The record number of LGBT hate violence homicides—the equivalent of one homicide of an LGBT individual for every week of last year—represents an 86 percent increase from 2016, according to the report. “A Crisis of Hate: Report on LGBTQ Hate Violence Homicides in 2017” squarely places the blame for the spike on what Anti-Violence Project executive director Beverly Tillery called “the escalation of violence” across America.

“This report is a wake-up call for all of us,” said Tillery in a statement. “Our communities live in an increasingly hostile and dangerous climate, after a year of anti-LGBTQ rhetoric and policies coming from the White House, Federal government agencies, state and local sources and in our communities across the country.”

The NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project, a national coalition of local programs and affiliate organizations dedicated to creating systemic and social change.
Among the findings:

Transgender women and queer, bi, or gay cisgender men made up the overwhelming number of victims.

Researchers noted a significant increase of reports of homicides of queer, bi, or gay cisgender men, from 4 reports in 2016, to 20 in 2017.

Since 2012, NCAVP records show what the report called “a consistent and steadily rising number of reports of homicides of transgender women of color.”

NCAVP collected information on 27 hate-violence related homicides of transgender and gender non-conforming people in 2017, compared to 19 reports for 2016; 22 were of transgender women of color,

Of the total number of homicides in 2017, 71 percent of the victims were people of color:
31 (60 percent) of the victims were Black
4 (8 percent) were Latinx
2 (4 percent) were Asian
1 (2 percent) was Native American
Nearly 60 percent of the total number of homicides in 2017 involved guns, including three people who were shot and killed by police.

Who were the victims who lost their lives because of hate in 2017? The report shows 67 percent of the victims were age 35 and under, and an equal number (32 percent) either knew their attacker or were killed by a stranger or someone who sought them out for sexual companionship.

Violence for these victims comes in many forms, and is often intersectional. Recently, one woman thanked the endangered Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) policy, which so far has protected her from deportation, in giving her the strength to come out as a victim of sexual violence. She did so in a video tweet posted by the Human Rights Campaign on Jan. 19.

“’It wasn’t until I had DACA that I felt human enough to walk into a police station and report my abuser.’ – Yuridia, a queer sexual violence survivor, credits DACA for bringing her out of the shadows,” the HRC tweet says. “The stakes are too high. Congress must pass the #DreamActNow.”

More than half of the 52 anti-LGBT homicides were committed in five states, with the majority in Texas (7) followed closely by New York State (6), Georgia (5) as well as Louisiana and Florida, with four each. Two victims were from California: Fresno and San Francisco, and both were cisgender men.

Imer Alvarado

Imer Alvarado was shot multiple times in Fresno last May. He was 34 and active in the drag community.

Anthony “Bubbles” Torres was murdered in San Francisco’s Tenderloin district in September. The 44-year-old was known as an activist and gender nonconforming performer.

Of the 22 transgender women of color named in the report, Mesha Caldwell was a 41-year-old beautician whose body was found along a dirt road in Canton, Miss. in January; the body of Ciara McElveen was discovered in February after being stabbed to death in New Orleans. She was 25. Both women were misgendered in the news media following their deaths.

Sayvon Zabar

Savyon Zabar was a 54-year-old cisgender gay man who was well-known on the club scene and considered a leader in New York City’s gay Latinix community. He was found strangled to death inside his Manhattan apartment a little more than a year ago; a man identified as a massage therapist was arrested and charged with his murder.

And there are 47 more stories just like theirs.

Since the report documents violence in 2017, it does not include the two trans murders so far in 2018, one of whom, young Viccky Gutierrez from Honduras, was found murdered in her Los Angeles apartment on Jan. 10. As suspect has been arrested in her case.

The NCAVP report profiles each victim of hate violence homicide, featuring photographs and the stories of these 52 individuals lost to fatal, anti-LGBT crimes.

“NCAVP will continue to say their names and re-commits to doing all we can to prevent hate violence and support survivors,” Tillery added. “We must bring more attention and action to deal with this epidemic of violence and work across all of our diverse communities to protect those most vulnerable and stand up to the hostile forces that have created this unacceptable climate of hate.”

“The time for addressing this crisis of violence,” said Tillery, “is now.”

Read the full report at https://avp.org/Crisisofhate

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Virginia

Virginia lawmaker introduces anti-Trans bathroom legislation

Democrats still have a 21-19 majority in the state Senate, and they have signaled they will oppose any effort to curtail LGBTQ rights

Published

on

Virginia State Capitol building (Blade file photo by Michael Key)

RICHMOND – A Virginia lawmaker has introduced a bill that would restrict the ability of transgender students and school board employees to use bathrooms and other facilities in public schools that are consistent with their gender identity.

House Bill 1126, which state Delegate John Avoli (R-Stanton) introduced, would require “each school board to adopt policies to require each student and school board employee to have access to restrooms, locker rooms and other changing facilities in public school buildings that are shared only by members of the same biological sex; lodging accommodations during school-sponsored trips that are shared only by members of the same biological sex; and a single-user restroom, locker room, or other changing facility in a public school building, upon request, if the school can reasonably accommodate such a request.”

Avoli introduced HB 1126 on Jan. 12 on the same day the Virginia General Assembly’s 2022 legislative session began with Republicans in control of the House of Delegates. Republican Gov. Glenn Youngkin took office on Jan. 15.

State Sen. Travis Hackworth (R-Tazewell County) last month introduced Senate Bill 20, which would eliminate the requirement that school districts must implement the Department of Education’s trans and non-binary student guidelines. State Del. Danica Roem (D-Manassas), who in 2018 became the first openly trans person seated in any state legislature in the U.S., told the Washington Blade last week that she expects SB 20 “would be dead on arrival” in committee.

Equality Virginia, a statewide LGBTQ rights group, on its website notes HB 1126 is among the bills that it opposes.

Democrats still have a 21-19 majority in the state Senate, and they have signaled they will oppose any effort to curtail LGBTQ rights in Virginia. Outgoing Equality Virginia Executive Director Vee Lamneck last week said their organization “will work with the Senate’s pro-equality majority to act as a crucial back stop against harmful legislation and efforts to roll back our hard-earned wins passed during the last two years.”

Continue Reading

U.S. Federal Courts

High Court to hear case of school prayer but not anti-LGBTQ web designer

The Justices added five new cases including the case of a fired former Bremerton, Washington assistant high school football coach

Published

on

The Justices of the United States Supreme Court (Photo Credit: U.S. Supreme Court)

WASHINGTON – After their private conference on Friday, the Justices of the U.S. Supreme Court added five new cases to this term including the case of a former Bremerton, Washington assistant high school football coach removed for refusing to halt his practice of praying at mid-field after games.

The court however declined to hear the case of a website designer who refused to create custom sites for same-sex weddings.

SCOTUSblog senior reporter Amy Howe reportedthe case of the football coach involves Joseph Kennedy, a practicing Christian whose religious beliefs require him to “give thanks through prayer, at the end of each game.” When he began his job as an assistant coach at Bremerton High School, a public school in Washington state, he initially prayed alone after games, but over time some of his players – and eventually a majority of the team – joined him. One parent complained that his son, a player on the team, felt like he had to join in the prayer, even though he was an atheist, or face a loss of playing time.”

Bremerton School District officials had attempted to accommodate Kennedy after warning him to stop the prayers as District officials clarified that they did not want to violate the Constitution’s establishment clause, which prohibits the government from favoring one religion over another.

The district offered Kennedy the ability to pray after the crowd had left the stadium or in a private space both options that he refused. Kennedy had retained counsel and the legal team indicated that they would pursue father legal action.

According to media accounts he then prayed publicly with his players at two more games after which he was placed on administrative leave. After a review which included a recommendation by the head football coach that he be terminated, Kennedy was let go and then filed a federal lawsuit alleging that Bremerton School District had violated his First Amendment rights and federal civil rights laws.

Joseph Kennedy being interviewed by NBC News affiliate KING-TV 5, Seattle, Washington

Kennedy came to the Supreme Court in 2018 seeking to get his job back while litigation continued. The court turned him down, but Justice Samuel Alito penned a statement regarding that denial that was joined by Justices Clarence Thomas, Neil Gorsuch, and Brett Kavanaugh. Alito wrote that Kennedy’s free-speech claim raised important issues, and he suggested the case may warrant review in the future,” SCOTUSblog reported.

Ultimately, the U.S. District Court rejected Kennedy’s argument ruling against him and the case was then heard by a 3 judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit, which upheld that decision. The 9th Circuit turned down a petition for an En banc (full) review by the entire 9th Circuit.

Kennedy returned to the Supreme Court in September 2021, telling the justices that the 9th Circuit’s ruling used “imagined Establishment Clause concerns to inflict real Free Exercise Clause damage,” he argued adding; “The religious expression of hundreds of thousands of teachers in the Ninth Circuit is now on the verge of extinction,” he contended. Moreover, Kennedy added, the ruling’s “chilling effects elsewhere around the country are palpable, as the Ninth Circuit essentially held” Kennedy’s “efforts to publicize the denial of his constitutional rights against him.”

The school district countered that whether Kennedy has the right to a “brief, quiet prayer by himself while at school” “is entirely beside the point” – particularly when, the district insisted, “every word of that description is wrong.” The dispute before the court, it stressed, is “about a school district’s authority to protect students when its employee does not work with it to find a reasonable accommodation.” A ruling for Kennedy, the school district warned, would require the Supreme Court “to overturn decades of settled law under both the Free Speech and Establishment Clauses,” SCOTUSblog reported.

The Justices declined to take up a case on appeal from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit, 303 Creative LLC v. Elenis, brought by The Alliance Defending Freedom, (ADF)- listed by the Southern Poverty Law Center as an anti-LGBTQ extremist hate group.

The case stemmed from a Lakewood, Colorado based web designer, who sued to challenge Colorado’s anti-discrimination law. ADF filed its appeal last Fall asking the U.S. Supreme Court to review that ruling.

Lorie Smith, claimed in court filings that the Colorado law violated Smith’s freedom of speech and freedom of religious expression, citing that it would force her to design wedding websites for same-sex couples which violated her ‘Christian’ beliefs.

In its 2-1 ruling, the 10th Circuit panel said Colorado had a compelling interest in protecting the “dignity interests” of members of marginalized groups through its law.

In a statement issued by ADF, the Arizona based firm claimed; “The 10th Circuit issued an unprecedented decision in the case, 303 Creative v. Elenis, holding that Colorado’s Anti-Discrimination Act both forced Lorie “to create websites—and thus, speech—that [she] would otherwise refuse,” and also created a “substantial risk” of removing “certain ideas or viewpoints from the public dialogue,” including Lorie’s beliefs about marriage.”

ADF added; “The lawsuit contends that Colorado Revised Statute § 24-34-601(2)(a) violates the First Amendment’s Free Speech and Free Exercise clauses. The state law is the same one the commission twice used against Masterpiece Cakeshop cake artist Jack Phillips, who is currently being harassed by an activist attorney in a third lawsuit that also attempts to use Colorado’s law against him. After a trial resulted in a decision against Phillips, ADF attorneys representing him and his shop have appealed that case to the Colorado Court of Appeals.”

Colorado Solicitor General Eric Olson questioned whether Smith should even be allowed to challenge the law since she had not started offering wedding websites yet, the Associated Press reported.

But if she did, Olson said, her argument would mean she would refuse to create a website for a hypothetical same-sex couple named Alex and Taylor but agree to make the same one for an opposite-sex couple with the same names. He said that would be discrimination under the Colorado Anti-Discrimination Act, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation.

Judge Mark Beck Briscoe wrote in the majority opinion (303 Creative, et al. v. Elenis, et al.) that “we must also consider the grave harms caused when public accommodations discriminate on the basis of race, religion, sex, or sexual orientation. Combatting such discrimination is, like individual autonomy, `essential’ to our democratic ideals.”

In his dissent, Chief Judge Timothy Tymkovich wrote that “this case illustrates exactly why we have a First Amendment. Properly applied, the Constitution protects Ms. Smith from the government telling her what to say or do.

Continue Reading

Virginia

Glenn Youngkin sworn in as 74th governor of Virginia

The newly sworn-in Republican Governor backed a Loudoun County teacher who opposed trans student guidelines

Published

on

Republican Virginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin being sworn into office (Blade screenshot via YouTube Live coverage)

RICHMOND – Republican Virginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin took office on Saturday amid concerns that he will seek to curtail LGBTQ rights in the state.

“Today we gather not as individuals, not as Republicans and Democrats,” said Youngkin after his swearing in. “Today we gather as Virginians.”

Former Gov. Ralph Northam and U.S. Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) are among those who attended the ceremony that took place at the State Capitol. Terry McAuliffe, who Youngkin defeated in the general election, did not attend because of a COVID-19 scare.

Youngkin during his campaign against McAuliffe expressed support for Tanner Cross, a gym teacher at a Leesburg elementary school who was suspended from his job after he spoke out against Virginia Department of Education guidelines that are designed to protect transgender and non-binary students. Youngkin has also said he does not support allowing trans children to play on sports teams that are consistent with their gender identity.

Youngkin on Thursday named Elizabeth Schultz, an anti-LGBTQ former member of the Fairfax County School Board, to his administration.

“We will remove politics from the classroom and focus on the essentials,” said Youngkin in his inaugural speech, without specifically mentioning LGBTQ students.

He added “parents should have a say in what is taught in schools.”

Youngkin has also expressed his opposition to marriage equality, but stressed it is “legally acceptable” in Virginia and would “support that” as governor.

Lieutenant Gov. Winsome Sears and Attorney General Jason Miyares also took office on Saturday.

Winsome, a former member of the Virginia House of Delegates, is the first woman and first female of color elected lieutenant governor. Miyares, a former House member whose mother was born in Cuba, is Virginia’s first Latino attorney general.

Youngkin in his inaugural speech noted “the people of Virginia just elected the most diverse leadership” in the state’s history. Youngkin’s first executive order ends “the use of” so-called “critical race theory” (which is not taught in Virginia schools) and other “divisive concepts” in Virginia’s public schools.

The General Assembly’s 2022 legislative session began on Wednesday.

Republicans control the House by a 52-48 margin. Democrats have a 21-19 edge in the Virginia Senate.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement

Follow Us @LosAngelesBlade

Sign Up for Blade eBlasts

Popular