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Out Magazine EIC Phillip Picardi considering exit over freelancers’ pay dispute

Freelancers are still awaiting compensation

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Out Magazine.

Out Magazine editor-in-chief Phillip Picardi is considering resignation amid a massive pay dispute between Pride Media and its freelance contributors.

Freelancers have been awaiting compensation for months. In February, the New York Times reported that more than 40 writers, photographers and editors had not been paid more than $100,000 for their work. 42 freelancers wrote an open letter on Mediumdemanding Pride Media, the company that owns the LGBT publication, to “pay us now.” Contributors also took to social media to air their grievances with Pride Media under the hashtag #OutOwes.

The issues arose when Out magazine was outsourced to independent production company McCarthy LLC and Grand Editorial, a company created by former Out magazine editor-in-chief Aaron Hicklin, to manage payments. In 2017 Hicklin sold Grand Editorial to McCarthy making the production deal between McCarthy and Pride Media. McCarthy says Pride Media violated its contract resulting in the company owing McCarthy thousands of dollars. Pride Media countered back with a lawsuit claiming McCarthy’s owner Evanly Schindler’s criticisms led to a loss in advertisers.

Picardi, whose career blossomed under his mentor Anna Wintour, left Condé Nast Inc.’s LGBTQ publication Them and took over as Out’s editor-in-chief in August 2018. In January, Picardi stated that he was “unaware of the full extent of this situation” when he took over as editor-in-chief.

“I entered this position unaware of the full extent of this situation but remain optimistic about and committed to its resolution. My team and I stand together in rebuilding this brand on a foundation we can all be proud of,” Picardi wrote in a tweet.

According to the Daily Beast, Picardi has threatened to leave his position if freelancers aren’t compensated.

“Phillip told Adam [Levin Pride Media CEO] that he couldn’t continue to work for him when he was exploiting queer people for their labor,” a source told the Daily Beast.

Wintour reportedly suggested Picardi “hire a lawyer,” according to a source at the Daily Beast.

Pride Media recently went through another shakeup when its CEO Nathan Coyle resigned to become head of the Ford modeling agency in April.

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Online Culture

Vlogger StanChris; My religious mom reacts to Norway’s “gay Santa” ad

My religious mom reacts to Norway’s gay Santa advertisement! Let’s see what she has to say about it.

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Screenshot via YouTube

LOS ANGELES – The twenty-something StanChris, the Out YouTuber who has been building his audience on his YouTube channel by vlogging about the ordinary everyday experiences of his life as a young gay guy is back- this time interviewing his mother.

My religious mom reacts to Norway’s gay Santa advertisement! Let’s see what she has to say about it.

My religious mom reacts to Norway’s “gay Santa” ad

********************

S O C I A L – L I N K S

→Instagram : stanchris https://instagram.com/stanchris

→ Twitter : stanchrisss https://twitter.com/stanchrisss

Subscribe here!!: https://youtube.com/c/stanchris

Watch more: https://youtu.be/rjI4c7nSXkw

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Sports

Commonwealth Games head wants to meet with Olympian Tom Daley

“I want to make it my mission […] countries that criminalize and make it punishable by death for LGBTQ people are not allowed to compete…”

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Commonwealth Games Federation Katie Sadleir & Perry, the official mascot for Birmingham 2022 Commonwealth Games (Photo by CGF)

LONDON – Katie Sadleir, the chief executive of the Commonwealth Games Federation (CGF) told British media outlets this week that she would be ‘happy’ to meet with British Olympic Gold medalist Tom Daley, to discuss the diver’s outspoken opposition to anti-LGBTQ+ countries participating in global athletic completions.

As the Federation gears up for the 2022 Birmingham Commonwealth Games, Pink News UK reported that being LGBTQ+ is still illegal in 36 of the 72 nations and territories that will be in Birmingham for the games.

In his speech in October accepting the 2021 Attitude Magazine Foundation’s Virgin Atlantic Attitude Sport Award, the 27-year-old British Olympic Gold Medalist and champion diver took aim at 10 countries that have death penalties for people who are LGBTQ+.

Daley told the audience at the Virgin Atlantic Attitude Awards held at The Roundhouse Theatre in Central London that the Olympic Games should ban those nations.

Tom Daley with his bronze medal win at the 2021Tokyo Olympic Games
(Photo via Team Great Britain)

“These past Olympic Games there were more out LGBT athletes than at any of the previous Olympics combined, which is a great step forward,” Daley said. “Yet there are still 10 countries that punish being gay with death that were still allowed to compete at the Olympic Games.”

Reflecting on the fact that the Tokyo Olympics had for the first time ever more LGBTQ+ athletes competing, Daly said, “It’s all well and good speaking about those things but I think it’s really important to try and create change rather than just highlighting and shining a light on those things.”

The Olympian champion diver went on to tell those in the audience at the Jaguar Motorcars co-sponsored event he was going to make it his mission to effect change.

“I want to make it my mission before the Paris Olympics in 2024 to make it so that the countries that criminalize and make it punishable by death for LGBT people are not allowed to compete at the Olympic Games,” Daley said.

He then pointed out that those same countries shouldn’t be able to host Olympic games either- then he called out the upcoming World Cup in Qatar;

“The World Cup coming up in Qatar has extreme rules against LGBT people and women and I think it should not be allowed for a sporting event to host in a country that criminalizes against basic human rights,” he said.

Sadleir said she would be “happy to meet” with Daley to see how the foundation can “create an opportunity to raise issues in a safe environment”.

But she admitted she can’t “go into the countries” that criminalise being LGBTQ+ and “change their laws at this stage,” Pink News UK noted.

“We don’t set the rules for all the countries but what we do is to create a platform to discuss things that we think are important,” Sadleir said.

She added that the CGF has been “working on the concept” for a Pride House in Birmingham which will create a “safe space” for queer athletes to “come and discuss issues, to raise the profile of the community”.

Pink News also reported that the Pride House in Birmingham will promote LGBT+ participation in sport while also hosting a packed programme of entertainment before and after the games.

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Sports

British LGBTQ+ ally & Formula One driver; “Saudi Arabia’s laws terrifying”

The Saudi Arabian authorities need to realize that the best PR comes from respecting human rights says Amnesty International

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Photo Credit: Amnesty International

JEDDAH, Saudi Arabia – Champion British Formula One racing driver and longtime LGBTQ+ ally Lewis Hamilton told the UK daily newspaper The Guardian in an interview that “he is not comfortable competing in Saudi Arabia given its repressive laws regarding the LGBTQ+ community.”

Saudi Arabia is hosting a Formula One Grand Prix race this weekend in Jeddah.

Hamilton went on to label those draconian laws as “terrifying” and called on Formula One to do more to address human rights issues in the countries it stages events in.

As if to underscore the urgency and clearly show his support the racer tweeted a picture of himself in his helmet which is adorned with a LGBTQ+ Progress Flag with a Non-binary symbol motif and the phrase ‘Equality for all.’

The Mercedes-AMG Petronas Formula One Team’s seven time Grand Prix champion driver had shown support for the LGBTQ+ community during the inaugural run of the Qatar Grand Prix Formula One race last month, which he won.

Lewis Hamilton 2016 Malaysia Grand Prix
(Photo by Morio)

Hamilton had debuted his helmet featuring the Pride Progress Flag, a redesigned and more inclusive version of the traditional rainbow flag, and emblazoned with the words “We Stand Together.”

Prior to the debut of the Qatar Formula One race and with the 2022 FIFA World Cup matches slated for 2022 in Qatar, focus once more fell on human rights issues. The Guardian reported that workers within the state have claimed that reforms to the country’s restrictive kafala labour sponsorship system have been ineffective while human rights groups continue to highlight oppressive male guardianship policies as well as discriminatory laws against women and LGBTQ+ individuals.

The Guardian noted Formula One attracted considerable criticism for racing in Saudi Arabia and Hamilton, “who has been a strident supporter of equality and diversity, admitted he did not feel at ease with the regime.”

“Do I feel comfortable here? I wouldn’t say I do,” he said. “But it’s not my choice to be here, the sport has taken the choice to be here.”

“Whilst we are here it’s important we do try to raise awareness,” he said. “In the last race you saw the [rainbow] helmet that I wore. I will wear that again here and in the next race [in Abu Dhabi] because it is an issue. If anyone wants to take time to read what the law is for the LGBT+ community, it is pretty terrifying. There are changes that need to be made,” Hamilton stressed.

The Saudi Arabian authorities need to realize that the best PR comes from respecting human rights.

Heba Morayef, Amnesty International

Responding to Saudi Arabia’s hosting of a Formula One Grand Prix this weekend, Heba Morayef, Amnesty International’s Regional Director for the Middle East and North Africa, said:

“Over the last few years, the Saudi Arabian authorities have invested heavily in PR stunts to rebrand their image and attempt to deflect attention from their brutal crackdown on activists and human rights defenders. Although we saw a brief lull in executions and prosecutions of activists during Saudi Arabia’s presidency of the G20 summit, that ended immediately after the event when the authorities ramped up their repression once again.

“The Saudi Arabian authorities need to realize that the best PR comes from respecting human rights. If the authorities want to be perceived differently, they should immediately and unconditionally release all those incarcerated for peacefully expressing their views, lift all travel bans and impose a moratorium on the death penalty. Foreign governments wishing to deepen their relations with Saudi Arabia should urge the authorities to address their egregious human rights record.

“Any company holding major events in Saudi Arabia must identify, mitigate or prevent any human right abuses that it may cause, contribute to or be directly linked to through its operations, products and services, including Formula 1 and its Grand Prix races.”

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