Connect with us

Theater

Veteran director Scholl embraces challenge of ‘Last Swallows’

A modern family dramatic comedy set in New England

Published

on

Kiff Scholl, gay news, Washington Blade

Kiff Scholl takes on ‘Last Swallows’ at The Other Space Sept. 21-Oct. 20 in West Hollywood. (Photo courtesy Scholl)

You might never have heard his name, but Kiff Scholl is one of the hardest-working men in Hollywood.

Like so many actors, he arrived here hoping for stardom, and came maddeningly near a shot at it when he was almost cast as the lead in the 1998 film, “Billy’s Hollywood Screen Kiss,” but lost out to another gay actor – Sean Hayes, then on the brink of TV icon status as Jack McFarland on “Will and Grace.” It was a blow, but he got some screen time in the movie anyway, and that was enough of a taste to keep him pushing for more.

Two decades later, Scholl is still pushing. He’s done a few roles, some voice work, and a lot of walk-ons and commercials (lately, he says, his forte has been playing dads). He’s even dabbled in filmmaking, most notably, perhaps, with the kooky “Scream of the Bikini,” a bizarrely hilarious satirical pseudo-vintage meta-mash-up of a badly-dubbed foreign language spy thriller, but also with the short film “Surprise,” an official selection at the Reel Affirmations Film Festival of which he is very proud. That successful screen career of his dreams has yet, so far, to materialize, but that doesn’t mean he’s ready to give up yet.

In the meantime, he’s built another kind of career – adjacent to, and often intertwined with the other – spreading his creative wings on the many 99-seat-and-under stages of Los Angeles, an arena in which he is now a fixture. He has built a reputation on edgy, risk-taking projects and helmed an impressive number of award-winning and nominated plays over the years, and his lengthy experience on both sides of “the process” has made him the kind of director that other actors are eager to work with. He’s garnered both praise and pans from critics over the years, but has endured the perils of each to emerge as a force to be reckoned with in the local theatre community – no small feat when that community is a city that attracts the best actors and artists from all over the world.

Lately, he’s parlayed that status into expanding his horizons even further; using the same “both-sides” perspective that makes him an actor’s director, he has taken on the mantle of dramaturg (or “script doctor,” if you’re more Hollywood-minded), sharing his insights to help inform and shape the vision of writers as they bring their work to life. The latest of these collaborative efforts is about to come full blossom when “Last Swallows” opens at The Other Space in West Hollywood on Sept 21.

Written by Cailin Harrison, it’s a “modern family dramatic comedy” set in present day New England, where retired patriarch Robert is happy to see life go by through binoculars birdwatching. His wife Elizabeth, however, is convinced he’s at death’s door; ever the doting matriarch, she is determined to bring their whole dysfunctional brood home for one final holiday together. Framed through the contemporary scope of a diverse family including the spouses of the families’ adult siblings, it’s a darkly funny look at a bickering family that also throws some powerful and dramatic curveballs along the way.

Scholl initially started working with Harrison when a friend recommended him to help her write a web series. In the process of their work together, it grew into the script for film so large and expensive to make that it had to be set aside. Still the two had enjoyed the collaboration, so they talked about other projects they might take on.

One of these turned out to be “Last Swallows,” and he was on board for it almost before he had even looked at the script.

“She brought it to me and said, ‘Here’s this play that I’ve been writing,’” remembers Scholl.
“’It’s about my husband’s family, I wrote it about how when one of his parents was dying, I wasn’t allowed to go to the funeral.’ And I immediately thought, ‘Oh my God! That’s a story I want to direct!’”

He elaborates, “Right away, all the characters are onstage, in four different homes, all talking at the same time. They repeat things that the other ones said, they comment, they talk, and it tells a story – almost like gears in a watch, where we get one part from this character and another part from this character, and it just folds into each other. It’s a director’s wet dream, to be able to tell that story when you’re given that challenge.”

He began working with Harrison as a dramaturg as well as a director (“She put her complete trust in me,” he beams) and helped her to think through the fine details of her script until it became the play that opens next weekend – one he says he’s “immensely proud” to be a part of.

“I knew this was going to be something remarkable,” he says with a sense of lingering awe. “Sometimes, you just know. And with this one, I knew. I think that by working together, we were able to take this play to a place where, at auditions, the actors were saying, ‘I know I’m not supposed to say anything, but I loved your play!’”

If his instincts are to be trusted (and his track record is strong evidence that they are), audiences can be expected to have the same reaction. “Last Swallows,” says Scholl, has exactly the qualities that attract him as a director.

“I want the most innovative, risky scripts I can get my hands on,” he says. “Any play where, for the first ten or twenty minutes, the audience is like ‘What’s happening? I don’t even know what’s going on but I’m on the edge of my seat!’ – that, to me, is a play that I want to direct.’”

Ultimately, he reflects, it’s the logical extension of the feelings he had as a small boy when he saw a play for the first time. “I wanted to be up there,” he says, “to do theatre that makes people utter sounds, to make them not just applaud but gasp and talk back.”

“Theatre has to be visceral,” he sums up. “You have to make the audience feel like they’re physically engaged if you want them to leave their house, and then go into a dark room with a bunch of strangers and react together. If I can do that, as a director, that is what I live for.”

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Theater

Broadway gathers to honor Sondheim in Times Square

They were gathered to pay homage to legendary Tony, Academy Award, and Grammy Award-winning composer and lyricist Stephen Sondheim

Published

on

Broadway gathers to honor Stephen Sondheim (Screenshot via YouTube)

NEW YORK – Light snow flurries swirled around the stars of theatre and stage of New York City’s ‘Great White Way’ as they gathered Sunday in Times Square- members of every Broadway company assembled singing in a powerful chorus “Sunday,” the powerfully emotional act one finale to “Sunday in the Park with George.”

They were gathered to pay homage to legendary Tony, Academy Award, and Grammy Award-winning composer and lyricist Stephen Sondheim. That piece being performed had garnered Sondheim a Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1985.

Broadway’s best were joined by Lin-Manuel Miranda, Sara Bareilles, Josh Groban, Kathryn Gallagher and Lauren Patton at ‘Sunday’ Performance in Times Square.

The man who was heralded as Broadway and theater’s most revered and influential composer-lyricist of the last half of the 20th century died at 91 Friday at his home in Roxbury, Connecticut.

“This felt like church,” Bareilles told Variety after the performance on Sunday. “In his remembrance, we did what theater does best. We sang and raised our voices and came together in community.” 

Variety also noted that during the celebration, Miranda offered a sermon of sorts. Foregoing a speech, he opened Sondheim’s “Look I Made A Hat,” an annotated anthology of the composer’s lyrics, and read from a few passages before the crowd.

“Sunday” from Sunday in the Park with George memorial for Stephen Sondheim

Continue Reading

Theater

Words never fail in MacIvor double bill by Open Fist Theatre

The playwright offers a contemplation of life and death, experience & memory, honesty & deceit, that make up human existence

Published

on

Schuyler Mastain, David Shofner, and Scott Roberts in THE SOLDIER DREAMS (Photo Credit: Frank Ishman)

LOS ANGELES – There has long been debate among theatrical scholars about whether going to a play has been traditionally considered an auditory or a visual experience.

The argument goes that, before the advent of modern technology which enabled cinema and other forms of filmed entertainment, the theatre was a place where sound was the primary vehicle by which an audience’s imagination could be transported out of the here and now, and that visual elements such as costumes, props, or mechanical stagecraft were secondary factors meant to reinforce and enhance the effect; for evidence of this, many point to Shakespeare, who in “Hamlet” had his lead character say “we’ll hear a play” (a phrase which was subsequently long-used preferentially by many theatre-goers in his homeland) and whose works are still renowned five-and-a-half centuries later for their masterful use of language to accomplish… well, pretty much everything required, from setting the scene and telling the story to exploring the deepest nooks and crannies of the human psyche.

Though the whole question might seem a bit pedantic in today’s world, it certainly touches on a major difference between the way we experience live theatre and the way we experience a film or television show, one which hinges on the main route these related-but-separate art forms take – through the ears or through the eyes – in transmitting information to the human brain. And if you want a good example of what a difference that difference makes, you couldn’t find a much better illustration than the plays of Candadian wordsmith Daniel MacIvor – two of which are currently being performed by the Open Fist Theatre Company at Atwater Village Theatre.

MacIvor, who is known also as a filmmaker and actor, garnered acclaim in the 1980s and 1990s for a series of plays, crafted in a minimalist style and reliant on an intricately constructed tapestry of words to convey situation, narrative, and intent. Standard conceits of theatrical storytelling, such as a linear flow or the assumption of a fourth wall, are often jettisoned in these works, which invite comparisons to absurdists like Beckett and Pinter and challenge audiences to connect the dots as they go in order to decipher meaning. 

Two of these pieces, both directed with a confident hand by Open Fist’s associate artistic director Amanda Weir, are paired by Open Fist into a brisk and engrossing double bill which leans hard into the award-winning playwright’s unique, meta-theatrical approach to maximum advantage.

The shorter of the two works, “Never Swim Alone,” is the more directly abstract. Taking place on stage that is bare save for a lifeguard stand and two chairs, it presents a ruthless competition of one-upmanship between two men, Frank and Bill (Bryan Bertone and Dylan Maddalena), who demonstrate an escalating series of scenarios under the watchful eye of “The Referee” (Emma Bruno) – a young woman with a secret connection to the boys these men used to be. Slyly witty and unexpectedly suspenseful, it examines the competitive machismo hidden beneath the slick and stylish suits of these two “Type A” businessmen with a dark and scathing sense of humor, as it slowly draws a connection between their never-ending battle for supremacy and the deep trauma of a shared childhood experience.

Originally produced in 1991, the roughly 30-minute exercise taps into the rich vein of toxic masculinity in order to make its points about the deep-seated fears and insecurities that drive so much of what our culture has long accepted as “typical” male behavior, with the two men vying for “points” against each other – awarded, of course, by the female referee, who holds absolute and irrefutable power in the game despite the clear lack of regard with which each of the participants reveals themselves to hold women in general.

It’s unapologetically clever and disarmingly comedic, reveling in its theatricality and its tactics as it explores the men’s rivalry and breaks each confrontation down into the all-too-familiar clichés in which they are mired. The elegant simplicity of its construction, which distills a far-reaching and deep-rooted phenomenon into clear and concise shapshots of social dysfunction, feels as effective today as it surely did over two decades ago.

From a 2021 perspective, however, the subject matter no longer seems as fresh. In the last few years (especially since the “Me Too” movement), the topic of bad male behavior has been rehearsed so frequently, and in so many different and brilliant ways, that many audiences may find themselves getting ahead of the play’s revelations before they fully land, and the conceit which ties the whole thing together – which we’ll not reveal here – may ultimately strike some viewers as too pat an explanation for what makes these men (and presumably, somehow by extension, all of them) tick.

Nevertheless, MacIvor’s wordplay never fails to be crisp and exciting as it trips from the talented tongues of the players (especially the charismatic Bertone and the sublimely expressive Maddalena, who take on the lion’s share of the work), and those who enjoy watching skillful actors engaged in an exercise of their craft are bound to find the pleasures of doing so more than enough to make up for the familiarity of the themes being explored.

More satisfying from a narrative standpoint, and more engaging on an emotional level, is “The Soldier Dreams,” which MacIvor – who is gay – wrote in 1998 as a response to the AIDS crisis. Again, the setting is sparse, suggesting an empty nightclub with a single bed, occupied by an ailing man, facing upstage in the center.

The man is David (David Shofner), who is in the process of dying as his lover Richard (Conor Lane) and dysfunctional family spar with each other over his comatose form, each clinging to their own perceived special relationship with him and examining their memories to find an answer to the lingering mysteries about his life. Meanwhile, David himself is revisiting a secret memory, from years before, involving a one-night stand with a German student (Schuyler Mastain) that may or may not have led to something more important to him than any of the people standing around his soon-to-be deathbed.

Here, the same linguistic tricks used by MacIvor to form the intellectual exercise of “Swim” are employed to illuminate the web of human relationships at the center of a bittersweet story; as a result, they strike us with deeper resonance and more urgency than in the other piece.

Through the myriad pathways of language, the playwright offers a contemplation of life and death, experience and memory, honesty and deceit, and a host of other dualities that make up human existence. There’s sharp humor and cutting observation along the way, along with a fair amount of painful and hard-to-watch bitterness, but it’s all tempered with compassion and the three-dimensional layers revealed by each character as we go, and in the end, we are left in a place of hope – or, at least, of acceptance. And making it all come together, a talented cast succeeds in the essential task of breathing life into MacIvor’s words, with Shofner, Lane, and Mastain as standouts among a solid and capable ensemble.

The two complementary plays continue their run at Atwater Village Theatre through December 12. Check the Open Fist website for performance dates and times.

Continue Reading

Theater

L.A.’s most iconic theater legacy & its most intriguing future

It stands not only proud in its contribution to the artistic past, but as a beacon to the magnificence that theater is yet to become

Published

on

Courtesy of The Montalbán Theater, Hollywood, California

HOLLYWOOD – If one follows the paths of legends of Hollywood, breathing in the air of the greats from the myths and truths of movie industry lore, it is difficult not arriving at the corner of Hollywood and Vine. It is here that the historic pulse seems to emanate beneath the magic.

It is also here that feet away, and part of that pulse, is one of the oldest theaters in Los Angeles. It is one that stands not only proud in its contribution to the artistic past, but as a beacon to the magnificence that theater is yet to become. That theater is The Montalbán.

The Montalbán is the most recent, and likely forever permanent name to a theater that has evolved and fought for its place in the theatrical history books.  It was originally envisioned in drawings done in 1925.

As the brainchild of the famous Wilkes Brothers, its beginnings were notorious. The Wilkes Family was the foremost theater family in the United States at the time. The brothers were the grand nephews of the Lincoln assassin John Wilkes Booth who emerged from a play on stage one fateful night, to shoot the president.

The brothers fought with Paramount on the location of their new theater, and while they won that battle, they were to lose a later one when one of the brothers was criminalized for racketeering and money laundering to the tune of 12.5 million dollars.

In any case, theater landscape of Los Angeles was forever affected by the presence of the Wilkes Brothers Vine Street Theater.

Wilkes Vine St. Theatre as it appeared in 1928
(Photo Credit: Los Angeles Public Library Collections)

Years later it would become the Huntington Hartford, then the James Doolittle.  UCLA bought it then to use as a theatrical annex while its theater department on the Westwood campus was re-tooled. During that timespan, the theater saw many incredible pre- and post-Broadway productions represented for Los Angeles audiences.

Meanwhile, another legacy was being formed in Hollywood.  A young debonair Latin actor was making his way through the ranks of Hollywood, at MGM studios and on Broadway.  His name was Ricardo Montalbán. Through roles as the fantasy giving Mr. Rourke of Fantasy Island, the wrathful Khan of Start Trek fame and the uber-classy spokesperson for the elegant Chrysler for many years, Ricardo not only broke stereotypes of Latino men, but became ever enshrined as a unique icon himself.

He was dignity and grace, the ideal vision of a “gentleman.” Behind the scenes, he was more of a renegade and a cultural hero.  He fought Hollywood’s cliché depictions of Mexicans.  He was told Latinos in movies were to be “colorful characters.”  He fought back and was black-listed. He retreated to Broadway where he starred on stage with Lena Horne, and down the street from Sammy Davis Jr.  They each brought inter-racial relationships to the stage in the various productions—all challenging the status quo and sensibilities of the day.

In 1970, Montalbán would found the organization Nosotros, which today has become the oldest Latino arts advocacy organization. He held a lifelong vision to give Latino artists a path towards success and authentic representative careers in film, theater and television.

Friends with the then Chancellor of UCLA, Ricardo was given the opportunity to take over the former Wilkes Brothers/Huntington Hartford/ Doolittle theater—and he went for it.

Ricardo Montalbán died in 2009.  Today, he would be 101.

His legacy is as alive as ever, carried on by two men who each in his own way, embodies the Montalbán heritage.  The first of these men is Gilbert Smith, who came to Ricardo through a Hollywood-esque type love story.

Screenshot of Gil Smith and Jay North
1959 Dennis the Menace Episode: Dennis Goes to the Movies

Gilbert had been a child actor and seen on such shows as Dennis the Menace.  Acting was not his thing, however, even though he hung out on the movie lot with the likes of Jay North, Billy Mumy, Ron Howard and others.  He found himself enamored with the magic of visual arts instead.  As a young man he jumped into various image projects looking for opportunities to create. He was doing a shoot with a lovely model named Anita, and together they began brainstorming on a fashion layout for a client.  The photo layout did not work out, but the collaboration sure did. They became inseparable to this day. “She has been my life long partner in business, in love, in passion and in art,“ Gilbert told me.

Anita, is the daughter of Ricardo Montalbán.  

Ricardo became Gilbert’s true father figure.  Years later, as Ricardo was stepping away from the theater’s leadership, the Artistic Director Margarita Martinez-Cannon brought Gilbert on to represent him.  She felt the board needed to have the Montalbán family involved. 

He is now the theater’s CEO.

Margarita also brought on another gentleman, who would soon become her successor to run operations, Ricardo Ortiz-Baretto.  Ricardo had been named after Ricardo Montalbán. “My mom named all of us after the biggest Latino celebrities of the day. It was a spiritual kismet that I came to this theater to carry on his legacy,” Ricardo says.

Gilbert has been a mastermind of innovation, visual presentation and technique.  The theater has been remodeled from bottom to rooftop in a creative and flexible space.  The orchestra level of the audience has been built out so that it is level to the stage—giving the opportunity for both Covid-regulated distancing or avantgarde theatrical presentations. 

Ricardo, who moved back to Los Angeles after he and his husband raised four sons, has worked to bring in diverse and creative productions to live up to the legacy and vision that Ricardo Montalbán established. Besides Latino and Black theatrical troupes, the theater has been involved in various charities from AIDS to fostercare.

“Gilbert’s vision is huge, and a lot of what we are now being able to bring into the theater is because he is willing to take a chance,” Ricardo said. “He has the dedication to Ricardo’s vision, that it is realized. Theater in LA will bounce back from the pandemic shutdown.  There is a lot of good theater in LA. That will never go away—it is why people are here in LA.”

The current production, Rooftop Screams, is on the Montalbán’s rooftop oasis. The rooftop venue is outfitted with a bar, concession stand, and kitchen, providing an open-air movie theater complete with a large projection screen, state-of-the-art projector, noise-canceling headphones, and fresh popcorn.  

Rooftop Screams includes wickedly scary and horrifically spooky films from the past 50 years.  It started Friday, October 1, 2021 with the 1996 American satirical slasher Scream, directed by Wes Craven. Other fan-favorites this month: The Shining, Friday the 13th, The Exorcist, It, Hocus Pocus, Beetlejuice, and Pan’s Labyrinth. There will be a double-feature presented on October 31st with The Nightmare Before Christmas followed by The Rocky Horror Picture Show.  The program includes live interactions with many of the movies’ stars and dignitaries appearing on Zoom, and in person.

There will be weekend programs non-stop throughout the holiday season.  As the pandemic restrictions continue to fall away, the Montalbán Theater is locked and loaded.  “We have a number of productions that are just waiting for us to say ‘go’.” Ricardo Ortiz-Baretto promises. 

In 1993 Ricardo Montalbán won the SAG Lifetime Achievement Award.  In his speech, he teased about about his name.  His son-in-law Gilbert sat in the audience with his daughter Anita and Ricardo remarked,  “I would like to thank my wonderful daughter Anita, to whom I gave a glorious name, Anita Montalbán … but she got married. And now she is … Anita Smith.”

Anthony Quinn with fellow actor Ricardo Montalban (Photo credit: Courtesy of the Screen Actors Guild)

Fear not Ricardo.  Your glorious name lives. Fear not to the artists of color seeking to achieve greatness.  Your legacy will go on forever, as permanent to Hollywood as the famous sign in the hills, thanks to a man named Ricardo, and a man named Smith.

And the theater forever named The Montalbán.

********************

Listen to the complete interview on Rated LGBT Radio with Rob Watson:

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement

Follow Us @LosAngelesBlade

Sign Up for Blade eBlasts

Popular