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Southern California gas prices rocket upwards to all-time highs

New highs for oil coupled with refineries switching to “summer blend” gas production have pushed up gas prices to all-time record levels

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Screenshot via KTLA

LOS ANGELES – The price of gasoline has significantly increased over the past few weeks and according to a new report out by the Triple A Auto Club of Southern California, as refineries begin switching over to a more expensive blend, costs could continue to soar at the pump in the coming weeks.

New highs for oil prices, coupled with local refineries switching to “summer blend” gasoline production and distribution, have pushed up gas prices in some Southern California areas to all-time record levels, according to the Auto Club’s Weekend Gas Watch.

The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $4.66, which is two cents higher than last week and five cents below the record price of $4.71 reached in late November.  The average national price is $3.41, which is six cents higher than a week ago.

The average price of self-serve regular gasoline in the Los Angeles-Long Beach area is $4.72 per gallon, which is five cents higher than last week, four cents higher than last month, $1.23 higher than last year and equal to the record price set Nov. 27. Orange County broke its all-time highest gas price average record today by rising five cents in the past week to $4.70 per gallon. In San Diego, the average price is $4.66, which is four cents higher than last week, three cents higher than last month, $1.21 higher than last year, and six cents below its record price.

On the Central Coast, the average price is $4.64, which is three cents higher than last week, two cents higher than last month, $1.23 higher than last year, and six cents below the record.  In Riverside, the average per-gallon price is $4.63, which is four cents higher than last week, two cents higher than last month, $1.23 higher than last year and five cents below the record. In Bakersfield, the $4.58 average price is one cent more than last Thursday, three cents lower than last month, $1.26 higher than a year ago today and eight cents lower than the record price.

“Refineries began shipping out the more expensive ‘summer blend’ of gasoline to Southern California gas pipelines on Monday, while oil prices have climbed by more than 10 dollars a barrel in the past month due to world tensions and OPEC concerns,” said Auto Club spokesman Doug Shupe. “If the upward pressure for gas prices continues, we could see new record prices in all Southern California areas in the next couple of weeks. To save money at the pump, we remind drivers to combine errands for fewer trips, drive gently and don’t speed, and shop around for the lowest gas prices with tools such as the AAA Mobile app.”

The Weekend Gas Watch monitors the average price of gasoline. As of 9 a.m. on Feb. 3, averages are:

L.A., O.C. gas prices reach record-breaking levels — and may climb even higher

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Southern California

Triple A: Gas prices drop as refineries increase production

The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $4.83, which is six cents lower than last week

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Typical oil refinery (Screenshot/YouTube American Petroleum Institute)

LOS ANGELES – Southern California gas prices continued dropping for a second week as oil prices stayed low and more local refinery production rates improved, according to the Auto Club’s Weekend Gas Watch.

The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $4.83, which is six cents lower than last week. The average national price is $3.44, which is two cents lower than a week ago.

The average price of self-serve regular gasoline in the Los Angeles-Long Beach area is $4.85 per gallon, which is six cents lower than last week, two cents higher than last month, and $1.17 lower than last year. In San Diego, the average price is $4.87, which is six cents lower than last week, four cents higher than last month, and $1.10 lower than last year.

On the Central Coast, the average price is $4.85, which is four cents lower than last week, nine cents higher than last month, and $1.08 lower than last year. In Riverside, the average per-gallon price is $4.79, which is five cents lower than last week, six cents higher than last month and $1.11 lower than a year ago. In Bakersfield, the $4.88 average price is two cents lower than last week, 14 cents higher than last month, and 94 cents lower than a year ago today.

“According to Oil Price Information Service (OPIS), the U.S. Energy Information’s Wednesday report revealed that West Coast refineries are now at their highest utilization rate in three months,” said Auto Club spokesperson Doug Shupe. “Oil prices are at their lowest level since December 2021, so that has also helped to drive down gas prices locally. However, a supply issue with Arizona gasoline could end up affecting Southern California prices, since local refineries produce some Arizona gasoline and some of their production could be diverted to alleviate that supply issue.” 

The Auto Club reminds drivers of the following tips to save money on gas:

• If you use premium unleaded fuel, make sure it is required for your vehicle, not just recommended. The Auto Club’s Automotive Research Center found that vehicles with recommended premium fuel performed safely with regular unleaded gasoline.

• Make sure your tires are properly maintained and inflated to the correct level.

• Maintain your car according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. Regular service will ensure optimum fuel economy.

• Avoid “jackrabbit” starts and hard accelerations. These actions greatly increase fuel consumption.

• Slow down and drive the speed limit. Fuel economy peaks around 50 mph on most cars, then drops off as speed increases. Reducing freeway speeds by 5 to 10 mph can increase fuel economy by as much as 14%.

• Use cruise control on the highway to help maintain a constant speed and save fuel. However, never use cruise control on slippery roads because you could lose control of the vehicle.

• Minimize your use of air conditioning.

• Avoid extended idling to warm up the engine, even in colder temperatures. It’s unnecessary and wastes fuel.

• Remove unnecessary and heavy items from your car.

• Minimize your use of roof racks and remove special carriers when not in use.

• Download the AAA App to find the cheapest gas prices near you.  

The Weekend Gas Watch monitors the average price of gasoline. As of 9 a.m. on March 23, averages are:

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Southern California

Triple A: Gas prices drop with economic concerns, gasoline imports

The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $4.89, which is four cents lower than last week

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Screenshot/YouTube

LOS ANGELES – Southern California wholesale gasoline price drops have led to some relief at the pump in most areas, according to the Auto Club’s Weekend Gas Watch. The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $4.89, which is four cents lower than last week. The average national price is $3.46, which is one cent lower than a week ago.

The average price of self-serve regular gasoline in the Los Angeles-Long Beach area is $4.91 per gallon, which is five cents lower than last week, 17 cents higher than last month, and 97 cents lower than last year. In San Diego, the average price is $4.93, which is three cents lower than last week, 19 cents higher than last month, and 88 cents lower than last year.

On the Central Coast, the average price is $4.89, which is one cent lower than last week, 22 cents higher than last month, and 89 cents lower than last year. In Riverside, the average per-gallon price is $4.84, which is four cents lower than last week, 22 cents higher than last month and 92 cents lower than a year ago. In Bakersfield, the $4.90 average price is one cent higher than last week, 24 cents higher than last month, and 79 cents lower than a year ago today.

“Oil Price Information Service (OPIS) analyzed Energy Information Administration data and reports that Western states received their highest level of gasoline imports since October,” said Auto Club spokesperson Doug Shupe. “OPIS also reports that US gas station sales declined year-over-year in February for the first time since January 2021, and economic concerns have pushed down oil prices to their lowest level since November 2021.”

The Auto Club reminds drivers of the following tips to save money on gas:

  • If you use premium unleaded fuel, make sure it is required for your vehicle, not just recommended. The Auto Club’s Automotive Research Center found that vehicles with recommended premium fuel performed safely with regular unleaded gasoline.
  • Make sure your tires are properly maintained and inflated to the correct level.
  • Maintain your car according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. Regular service will ensure optimum fuel economy.
  • Avoid “jackrabbit” starts and hard accelerations. These actions greatly increase fuel consumption.
  • Slow down and drive the speed limit. Fuel economy peaks around 50 mph on most cars, then drops off as speed increases. Reducing freeway speeds by 5 to 10 mph can increase fuel economy by as much as 14%.
  • Use cruise control on the highway to help maintain a constant speed and save fuel. However, never use cruise control on slippery roads because you could lose control of the vehicle.
  • Minimize your use of air conditioning.
  • Avoid extended idling to warm up the engine, even in colder temperatures. It’s unnecessary and wastes fuel.
  • Remove unnecessary and heavy items from your car.
  • Minimize your use of roof racks and remove special carriers when not in use.
  • Download the AAA App to find the cheapest gas prices near you. 

The Weekend Gas Watch monitors the average price of gasoline. As of 9 a.m. on March 16, averages are:

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Southern California

Triple A: Signs of reversal for gas prices as they near $5

The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $4.93, which is ten cents higher than last week

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Screenshot/YouTube

LOS ANGELES – While Southern California gas prices continued increasing this week, a big drop in wholesale prices may have already started reversing that trend, according to the Auto Club’s Weekend Gas Watch.

The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $4.93, which is ten cents higher than last week. The average national price is $3.47, which is ten cents higher than a week ago.

The average price of self-serve regular gasoline in the Los Angeles-Long Beach area is $4.96 per gallon, which is seven cents higher than last week, 29 cents higher than last month, and 69 cents lower than last year. In San Diego, the average price is $4.96, which is seven cents higher than last week, 29 cents higher than last month, and 64 cents lower than last year.

On the Central Coast, the average price is $4.90, which is seven cents higher than last week, 29 cents higher than last month, and 65 cents lower than last year. In Riverside, the average per-gallon price is $4.88, which is ten cents higher than last week, 35 cents higher than last month and 67 cents lower than a year ago. In Bakersfield, the $4.89 average price is 11 cents higher than last week, 28 cents higher than last month, and 54 cents lower than a year ago today.

“New reports from the Energy Information Administration and California Energy Commission indicate that both gasoline supplies and refinery utilization rates have improved in the past week, and there are fewer sales for Los Angeles wholesale gasoline, which is driving that cost down significantly,” said Auto Club spokesperson Doug Shupe. “We have already seen some of the higher-priced cities post price drops today, and that trend should continue as long as wholesale prices stay at their current level or keep dropping.” 

The Auto Club reminds drivers of the following tips to save money on gas:

  • If you use premium unleaded fuel, make sure it is required for your vehicle, not just recommended. The Auto Club’s Automotive Research Center found that vehicles with recommended premium fuel performed safely with regular unleaded gasoline.
  • Make sure your tires are properly maintained and inflated to the correct level.
  • Maintain your car according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. Regular service will ensure optimum fuel economy.
  • Avoid “jackrabbit” starts and hard accelerations. These actions greatly increase fuel consumption.
  • Slow down and drive the speed limit. Fuel economy peaks around 50 mph on most cars, then drops off as speed increases. Reducing freeway speeds by 5 to 10 mph can increase fuel economy by as much as 14%.
  • Use cruise control on the highway to help maintain a constant speed and save fuel. However, never use cruise control on slippery roads because you could lose control of the vehicle.
  • Minimize your use of air conditioning.
  • Avoid extended idling to warm up the engine, even in colder temperatures. It’s unnecessary and wastes fuel.
  • Remove unnecessary and heavy items from your car.
  • Minimize your use of roof racks and remove special carriers when not in use.
  • Download the AAA App to find the cheapest gas prices near you. 

The Weekend Gas Watch monitors the average price of gasoline. As of 9 a.m. on March 9, averages are:

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Southern California

Triple A: Gas prices still climbing toward $5 a gallon

The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $4.83, which is eight cents higher than last week

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Screenshot/YouTube

LOS ANGELES – Southern California gas prices continued their traditional increase during this time of year for the sixth week in a row, according to the Auto Club’s Weekend Gas Watch. The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $4.83, which is eight cents higher than last week. The average national price is $3.37, which is two cents lower than a week ago.

The average price of self-serve regular gasoline in the Los Angeles-Long Beach area is $4.89 per gallon, which is six cents higher than last week, 32 cents higher than last month, and four cents lower than last year. In San Diego, the average price is $4.89, which is six cents higher than last week, 30 cents higher than last month, and one cent lower than last year.

On the Central Coast, the average price is $4.83, which is seven cents higher than last week, 32 cents higher than last month, and one cent lower than last year. In Riverside, the average per-gallon price is $4.78, which is five cents higher than last week, 34 cents higher than last month and six cents lower than a year ago. In Bakersfield, the $4.78 average price is four cents higher than last week, 22 cents higher than last month, and one cent higher than a year ago today.

“Oil Price Information Service and the Energy Information Administration report that West Coast refinery utilization rates are down to 77.8 percent due to maintenance and breakdowns,” said Auto Club spokesperson Doug Shupe. “This is having a significant impact on California supply while most of the rest of the country is experiencing gas price stability or declines.” 

The Auto Club reminds drivers of the following tips to save money on gas:

  • If you use premium unleaded fuel, make sure it is required for your vehicle, not just recommended. The Auto Club’s Automotive Research Center found that vehicles with recommended premium fuel performed safely with regular unleaded gasoline.
  • Make sure your tires are properly maintained and inflated to the correct level.
  • Maintain your car according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. Regular service will ensure optimum fuel economy.
  • Avoid “jackrabbit” starts and hard accelerations. These actions greatly increase fuel consumption.
  • Slow down and drive the speed limit. Fuel economy peaks around 50 mph on most cars, then drops off as speed increases. Reducing freeway speeds by 5 to 10 mph can increase fuel economy by as much as 14%.
  • Use cruise control on the highway to help maintain a constant speed and save fuel. However, never use cruise control on slippery roads because you could lose control of the vehicle.
  • Minimize your use of air conditioning.
  • Avoid extended idling to warm up the engine, even in colder temperatures. It’s unnecessary and wastes fuel.
  • Remove unnecessary and heavy items from your car.
  • Minimize your use of roof racks and remove special carriers when not in use.
  • Download the AAA App to find the cheapest gas prices near you. 

The Weekend Gas Watch monitors the average price of gasoline. As of 9 a.m. on March 2, averages are:

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Southern California

The 5 Freeway reopens at the Grapevine as clean-up continues

The National Weather Service forecast that an approaching storm system will bring rain and snow tonight through Wednesday

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California Highway Patrol cruiser outside the entrance to the Petrified Forest near Calistoga in Northern California as state-wide recovery and clean-up continues from the historic winter storm, Feb. 25, 2023 (Photo Credit: CHP Media Affairs/Facebook)

LOS ANGELES – The California Highway Patrol reopened the 5 Freeway along the Grapevine Sunday afternoon as Southern California emerged from a storm that brought a hefty dumping of both snow and rain, which also saw flooding and colder than average temperatures.

More than 10 inches of rain fell in Woodland Hills. Downtown Los Angeles saw 4.49 inches, marking only the sixth time since 1877 that downtown received that much rain in two consecutive days. The National Weather Service forecast calls for a weaker storm front to move into the Southland Sunday.

The California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services tweeted reminders to Californians to “stay alert, stay informed, & stay prepared!”

The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power has been working hard through challenging weather conditions over the weekend to try and restore power to its 1.5 million electric customers KTLA reported Sunday afternoon. According to LADWP, more than 98,000 customers have had their power restored since the storm started on Friday; 50,000 of which were restored in the last 24 hours. 

KTLA also noted that the normal 12-to-24-hour outage response time was increased to 24 to 48 hours as crews found that the record storm would continue to knock out power even as they restored it. 

A LADWP spokesperson told KTLA and other media outlets: “Many of the incidents that crews have worked on and continue to work on involve downed trees that take out telephone poles and power lines alike, which slows the cleanup process considerably and makes it much more dangerous.”

LADWP’s Brian Wilbur, Senior Assistant General Manager of the Power System, also explained that some of the outages are a result of flooding and water intrusion into underground electrical systems, which can only be repaired if the crews go vault to vault to identify the source of the damage first, adding to the amount of time it takes to get power back up and running. 

“We want our customers who are without power to know that we are working as hard and safely as we can to get your power restored and we appreciate your patience,” said Wilbur. “High winds and heavy rain like we experienced can cause significant damage, but our crews continue to make steady and strong progress and will work around the clock until everyone is back on.” 

The National Weather Service forecast that an approaching storm system will bring rain and snow tonight through Wednesday. Rain totals of 0.50 to1.00 inches across coasts and valleys and 1 to 2 inches for Mountains and foothills are expected.

Snow levels will be around 3,000 to 4,500 feet, lowest on Tuesday and Wednesday. Snow totals 4 to 10 inches and locally 18 inches of snow accumulations are possible. The highest accumulations will be over the eastern San Gabriel Mountains.

The Grapevine on Interstate 5 has a 60-80% chance of greater than 3 inches of snow, and a 20-30% chance of greater than 6 inches of snow accumulations. Slick roads with water ponding is possible along with travel delays. Allow extra time while driving. For mountains, prepare for road delays or closures in the mountains.

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Southern California

Rain, snow & high winds continue as 5 & 14 Freeways are closed

An army of Caltrans snowplows are working to clear roads. A winter storm warning remains in effect until at least 4 p.m. on Saturday

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Photo Credit: CalTrans

OXNARD – The National Weather Service forecast that blizzard conditions with heavy snow and winds gusting up to 45 mph will continue with near zero visibility until the storm begins to taper off around 4pm this afternoon. The NWS also continues to warn that heavy at time rainfall will increase the dangers of flash flooding in some low lying areas.

The powerful winter storm carving a path throughout the Southern California region is expected to weaken Saturday, leaving heaps of sleet, snow and record-setting rain behind in its wake.

Reports of power outages, grounded flights at all 3 major airports and road closures continued as the stormfront of frigid moisture carved a southeastern path. LAFD and other rescue/emergency services crews came to the aid of several people.

Earlier Saturday morning, the California Highway Patrol closed both Interstate 5 through the Grapevine and Highway 14 in the Santa Clarita Valley because of icy, dangerous driving conditions.

California Highway Patrol units are stationed on the northbound side of the 5 Freeway, ordering drivers to turn around and head back southward towards Los Angeles.

This follows Friday’s closure, when authorities shut down a roughly 20-mile stretch of the 5 Freeway in both directions due to severe, icy conditions.

An army of Caltrans snowplows are working to clear the roads while salting the pavement. A winter storm warning remains in effect until at least 4 p.m. on Saturday, although closures can happen at any time if conditions become too severe, according to a CHP spokesperson. Areas impacted include Santa Barbara County Mountains, Ventura County Mountains and Los Angeles County Mountains.

Storm dumps several feet of snow on San Bernardino mountains amid blizzard warning:

KABC 7 weather reported that by noon, the rain will start to break up a bit, but some areas will still be seeing some snow. Coastal and valley areas could get between 2 and 5 inches of rain during the storm by Saturday night, with 5 to 7 inches possible in the foothills.

By 11 p.m.  the rain will begin backing off but it’ll still be snowing in some areas, though it won’t be as intense. Sunday is expected to be mostly clear, while some clouds will return Monday – and then a new storm system is moving in Tuesday.

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Southern California

Flash flood warning LA County; Snow & heavy rain impact travel

The California Highway Patrol is cautioning that dangerous mountain driving conditions are currently affecting travel

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Wintery mix of sleet and rain in the Beverly Grove neighborhood of Los Angeles Friday evening Feb. 24, 2023 (Photo by Troy Masters)

OXNARD – The National Weather Service has issued a flash flood watch for parts of LA County. The Flash Flood Warning has been expanded to include nearly 6 million people in metro Los Angeles. It remains in effect until 10 p.m.

Graphic courtesy of the National Weather Service

The California Highway Patrol is cautioning that dangerous mountain driving conditions are currently affecting travel. Drivers are urged to avoid traveling on mountain roads through Saturday.

Currently CHP units are conducting escorts through the Grapevine on the 5 Freeway: “Units from the Fort Tejon and Newhall areas are conducting escorts through the Grapevine. Road conditions are still very wet. Do not attempt to pass the CHP officers conducting the escorts. The weather conditions are expected to last through the night so please travel safe.”

Heavy band of rain moving into Ventura County, dangerous mountain driving conditions persist

A band of heavier rain is expected to move into Ventura County between 7 p.m. and 11 p.m. Friday night, “capable of producing rainfall rates locally to 1 inch per hour,” said NWS.

Graphic courtesy of the National Weather Service

Updated Cold Weather Alert, Cold Temperatures Expected in Parts of Los Angeles County

The Los Angeles County Health Officer is issuing a Cold Weather Alert due to the National Weather Service’s forecast for low temperatures. Wind chill temperatures are expected to be below 32 degrees Fahrenheit. Affected areas include:

  • Santa Clarita Valley – Friday, February 24, 2023 to Sunday, February 26, 2023 (continued)
  • Lancaster (Antelope Valley)  – Friday, February 24, 2023 to Tuesday, February 28, 2023 (continued)
  • Mount Wilson (LA County Mountains)  – Friday, February 24, 2023 to Tuesday, February 28, 2023 (continued)
  • Woodland Hills (West San Fernando Valley) – Sunday, February 26, 2023
  • Burbank (East San Fernando Valley) – Sunday, February 26, 2023
  • San Gabriel (West San Gabriel Valley) – Sunday, February 26, 2023
  • Pomona (East San Gabriel Valley) –  Sunday, February 26, 2023

“Taking extra precautions amid cold weather events is especially important for children, the elderly, those with disabilities, and those with special medical needs,” said Muntu Davis, MD, MPH, Los Angeles County Health Officer. “Shelters and other public facilities are open for those who have no access to a warm space. It’s also important for everyone to make sure they are staying warm safely—never heat a home with a stove, oven, or barbeque as this could lead to carbon monoxide poisoning.”

During these cold weather conditions, you can do several things to help yourself and others stay safe:

  • Avoid carbon monoxide poisoning. Never use a generator inside a home, shed or garage even if doors and windows are open. Keep generators outside and far away from windows, doors and vents.
  • Never use charcoal grills or camp stoves indoors. Deaths have occurred after people burned charcoal or used camp stoves in enclosed spaces, which produced lethal levels of carbon monoxide.
  • Never heat your home with a gas stovetop or oven.
  • Do not touch or approach a downed power line; call 9-1-1 if you see a downed or damaged electrical line.
  • Avoid using candles. If possible, use flashlights instead. If you must use candles, do not burn them on or near anything that can catch fire. Never leave burning candles unattended or near children or bedding. Extinguish candles when you leave the room.
  • Have a plan for back-up power if you or someone in your family is dependent on electricity for medical devices.
  • Wear layers and have blankets available to add additional warmth. Layers will keep you warmer than a bulky sweater. Stay dry to avoid hypothermia.
  • If it is safe, check on neighbors who may need assistance — older adults, people with disabilities and young children are more at risk in extreme cold.

Health Risks

Hypothermia: People exposed to cold weather for prolonged periods can lose body heat and develop hypothermia.  Symptoms vary depending on how long you are exposed to cold temperatures.  Early symptoms of hypothermia include shivering, fatigue, loss of coordination, and confusion and disorientation. Late symptoms of hypothermia include no shivering, blue skin, dilated pupils, slowed pulse and breathing, and loss of consciousness.

Frostbite: People exposed to extremely cold weather conditions with snow and freezing temperatures may be at risk of frostbite. Frostbite is a bodily injury caused by freezing that results in loss of feeling and color in affected areas. The most common affected areas are the nose, ears, cheeks, chin, fingers, or toes. Gently warm the person and seek immediate medical care if you believe someone is showing signs of hypothermia or frostbite.

Carbon monoxide poisoning:  Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless gas that can kill you. It is found in fumes produced any time you burn fuel in cars or trucks, small engines, stoves, lanterns, grills, fireplaces, gas ranges, or furnaces. Carbon monoxide can build up indoors and poison people and animals who breathe it. Symptoms include shortness of breath, headaches, muscle and joint pain, and nausea. Exposure to high levels of carbon monoxide can lead to death within minutes. Those suffering from carbon monoxide poisoning should be immediately taken outside, into fresh air, and should be rushed to the emergency room for immediate medical treatment.

Emergency Shelter

The Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA) emergency shelters offer temporary shelters across the County to protect people experiencing homelessness during colder months. These beds are available through March 2023.

Persons seeking shelter services to stay in a warm place can visit www.lahsa.org/winter-shelter, dial 2-1-1 or call the Winter Shelter Hotline at 1(800) 548-6047. Transport services are available for those in need.  

En español

Alerta Actualizada de Clima Frío, Se Esperan Bajas Temperaturas en Partes del Condado de Los Ángeles

El Funcionario de Salud del Condado de Los Ángeles está emitiendo una Alerta de Clima Frío debido al pronóstico de bajas temperaturas del Servicio Meteorológico Nacional. Se espera que las temperaturas de sensación térmica estén por debajo de los 32 grados Fahrenheit. Las áreas afectadas incluyen:

  • Valle de Santa Clarita: del viernes 24 de febrero del 2023 a domingo 26 de febrero del 2023 (continuado)
  • Lancaster (Valle del Antílope): del viernes 24 de febrero del 2023 a martes 28 de febrero del 2023 (continuado)
  • Mount Wilson: del viernes 24 de febrero del 2023 a martes 28 de febrero del 2023 (continuado)
  • Woodland Hills (Oeste del Valle de San Fernando): domingo 26 de febrero del 2023
  • Burbank (Este del Valle de San Fernando): domingo 26 de febrero del 2023
  • San Gabriel (Oeste del Valle de San Gabriel): domingo 26 de febrero del 2023
  • Pomona (Este del Valle de San Gabriel): domingo 26 de febrero del 2023

“Tomar precauciones adicionales durante eventos de clima frío es especialmente importante para los niños, las personas mayores o con discapacidades, y las personas con necesidades médicas especiales,” dijo Muntu Davis, MD, MPH, Funcionario de Salud del Condado de Los Ángeles. “Los albergues y otras instalaciones públicas están abiertos para aquellos que no tienen acceso a un espacio cálido. También es importante que todos se aseguren de calentar su hogar de manera segura: nunca caliente una casa con una estufa, un horno o una parrilla, ya que esto podría provocar envenenamiento por monóxido de carbono”.

Durante estas condiciones de clima frío, puede hacer varias cosas para mantenerse y a sus seres queridos seguros:

  • Evite el envenenamiento por monóxido de carbono. Nunca use un generador dentro de una casa o garaje, incluso si las puertas y ventanas están abiertas. Mantenga los generadores afuera y lejos de ventanas, puertas y conductos de ventilación.
  • Nunca use parrillas de carbón o estufas de campamento en el interior. Personas han fallecido después de quemar carbón o usar estufas de campamento en espacios cerrados, lo que produjo niveles letales de monóxido de carbono.
  • Nunca caliente su hogar con una estufa u horno de gas.
  • No toque ni se acerque a una línea eléctrica caída; llame al 9-1-1 si ve una línea eléctrica caída o dañada.
  • Evite el uso de velas. Si es posible, use linternas en vez de velas. Si no tiene otra opción, no las queme sobre o cerca de algo que pueda incendiarse. Nunca deje velas encendidas desatendidas o cerca de niños o ropa de cama. Apague las velas cuando salga de la habitación.
  • Tenga un plan de energía de respaldo si usted o alguien de su familia depende de la electricidad para dispositivos médicos.
  • Vístase con varias capas de ropa y tenga cobijas disponibles para agregar calor adicional. Las capas lo mantendrán más caliente que un suéter grueso. Manténgase seco para evitar la hipotermia.
  • Si es seguro, visite a sus vecinos que puedan necesitar ayuda: los adultos mayores, las personas con discapacidades y los niños pequeños corren más riesgo en condiciones de frío extremo.

Riesgos de Salud

Hipotermia: las personas expuestas al frío durante períodos prolongados pueden perder calor corporal y desarrollar hipotermia. Los síntomas varían dependiendo de cuánto tiempo esté expuesto a temperaturas frías. Los primeros síntomas de hipotermia incluyen escalofríos, fatiga, pérdida de coordinación, confusión y desorientación. Los últimos síntomas de hipotermia incluyen ausencia de escalofríos, piel azulada, pupilas dilatadas, pulso y respiración lentos y pérdida del conocimiento.

Congelación: las personas expuestas a condiciones extremadamente frías con nieve y temperaturas bajo cero pueden correr el riesgo de congelarse. La congelación es una lesión corporal causada por el frío extremo que resulta en la pérdida de sensibilidad y color en las áreas afectadas. Las áreas afectadas más comunes son la nariz, las orejas, las mejillas, la barbilla, los dedos de las manos o de los pies. Caliente a la persona cuidadosamente y busque atención médica inmediata si cree que alguien muestra señales de hipotermia o congelación.

Envenenamiento por monóxido de carbono: El monóxido de carbono (CO) es un gas inodoro e incoloro que puede matarlo. Se encuentra en los vapores producidos cada vez que quema combustible en automóviles o camiones, motores pequeños, estufas, linternas, parrillas, chimeneas, estufas de gas u hornos. El monóxido de carbono puede acumularse en el interior y envenenar a las personas y los animales que lo respiran. Los síntomas incluyen dificultad para respirar, dolores de cabeza, dolor muscular y articular, y náuseas. La exposición a altos niveles de monóxido de carbono puede provocar la muerte en cuestión de minutos. Las personas que sufren de envenenamiento por monóxido de carbono deben ser llevadas inmediatamente al aire libre, y deben ser trasladadas rápidamente a la sala de emergencias para recibir tratamiento médico inmediato.

Albergues de Emergencia

Los albergues de emergencia de la Autoridad de Servicios para Personas sin Hogar de Los Ángeles (LAHSA por sus siglas en inglés) ofrecen albergues temporales en todo el condado para proteger a las personas sin hogar durante los meses más fríos. Estas camas están disponibles hasta marzo del 2023

Las personas que buscan servicios de albergues para permanecer en un lugar cálido pueden visitar www.lahsa.org/winter-shelter marcar 2-1-1 o llamar a la línea directa de albergues de invierno al 1(800) 548-6047. Los servicios de transporte están disponibles para aquellos que lo necesiten.

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Southern California

Triple A: Gas prices continue upward for fifth week

The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $4.75, which is seven cents higher than last week

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LOS ANGELES – Southern California gas prices are up for the fifth week in a row and are now higher in most areas than a year ago just before the start of the Russia-Ukraine war, according to the Auto Club’s Weekend Gas Watch.

The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $4.75, which is seven cents higher than last week. The average national price is $3.39, which is three cents lower than a week ago.

The average price of self-serve regular gasoline in the Los Angeles-Long Beach area is $4.83 per gallon, which is nine cents higher than last week, 31 cents higher than last month, and three cents higher than last year. In San Diego, the average price is $4.83, which is nine cents higher than last week, 28 cents higher than last month, and seven cents higher than last year.

On the Central Coast, the average price is $4.76, which is nine cents higher than last week, 28 cents higher than last month, and four cents higher than last year. In Riverside, the average per-gallon price is $4.74, which is 11 cents higher than last week, 34 cents higher than last month and one cent higher than a year ago. In Bakersfield, the $4.74 average price is eight cents higher than last week, 21 cents higher than last month, and seven cents higher than a year ago today.

“Los Angeles wholesale gasoline prices moved up significantly last week in response to refinery problems and have backed down somewhat, but they are still at almost the same level as this time last year on the eve of the Russian Ukraine invasion,” said Auto Club spokesperson Doug Shupe. “This is despite the fact that oil prices are nearly 20 dollars lower per barrel than this time last year, indicating that other factors are playing a role in the increased prices, such as continued inflation and California’s steady reduction in refinery output and capacity. “

The Auto Club reminds drivers of the following tips to save money on gas:

  • If you use premium unleaded fuel, make sure it is required for your vehicle, not just recommended. The Auto Club’s Automotive Research Center found that vehicles with recommended premium fuel performed safely with regular unleaded gasoline.
  • Make sure your tires are properly maintained and inflated to the correct level.
  • Maintain your car according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. Regular service will ensure optimum fuel economy.
  • Avoid “jackrabbit” starts and hard accelerations. These actions greatly increase fuel consumption.
  • Slow down and drive the speed limit. Fuel economy peaks around 50 mph on most cars, then drops off as speed increases. Reducing freeway speeds by 5 to 10 mph can increase fuel economy by as much as 14%.
  • Use cruise control on the highway to help maintain a constant speed and save fuel. However, never use cruise control on slippery roads because you could lose control of the vehicle.
  • Minimize your use of air conditioning.
  • Avoid extended idling to warm up the engine, even in colder temperatures. It’s unnecessary and wastes fuel.
  • Remove unnecessary and heavy items from your car.
  • Minimize your use of roof racks and remove special carriers when not in use.
  • Download the AAA App to find the cheapest gas prices near you. 

The Weekend Gas Watch monitors the average price of gasoline. As of 9 a.m. on Feb. 23, averages are:

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Southern California

National Weather Service predicts major storm system for LA area

The National Weather Service is predicting a significant storm system with a blizzard warning & heavy rainfall throughout Southern California

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OXNARD, Calif. – The National Weather Service is predicting a significant storm system with a blizzard warning and heavy rainfall throughout Southern California.

A cold and dangerous winter storm is slated to continue into the weekend. Light showers are possible through Thursday before more significant precipitation is expected Friday into Saturday. Rain totals through the weekend may range from 2 to 5 inches. Most importantly, snow levels will lower to unusually low levels, possibly bringing snow down to 1,500 feet through Thursday morning.

Up to a few inches of snow is possible from 1,500-2,500 feet, 6 to 12 inches possible for 2,500 to 4,000 feet, and up to 7 feet above 4,500 feet. Gusty southerly winds are expected Thursday night through Friday along the cold front, with mountain and foothills reaching 60 to 75 mph, and coasts and valleys reaching 30 to 50 mph.

High temperatures will be 10-20 and locally 25 degrees below normal. Wind chills of 0 to 10, locally down to -5 degrees in the mountains are possible during the strongest winds. Prepare for possible road closures/delays on mountain, foothill, and desert roads.

There is the potential for widespread snow impacts, and road closures, including whiteout and blizzard conditions with an increased threat of avalanches. Due to the strong winds, downed trees and power lines are possible. Take protective actions for plants and pets due to the very cold weather.

During heavy rains and cold temperatures, stay prepared:

  • Keep emergency supplies, such as a flashlight, water, food, a first-aid kit, portable radio, and extra batteries on-hand and easily accessible.
  • Clear all drains and rain gutters on your property and dispose of all trash and yard trimmings properly to avoid blocking drains.
  • Know how to turn off utilities.
  • Monitor forecasts to be aware of weather that may impact the area.
  • Subscribe to receive Alert LA County emergency notifications by email or text message by signing up at https://ready.lacounty.gov/alerts and subscribe to Nixle public safety alerts by texting your ZIP code to 888-777.

As a reminder, driving in rain, whether a drizzle or a heavy downpour, can be dangerous. Rainy conditions are directly associated with higher accident rates. Adjust your driving style for wet roads and reduced visibility.

The following tips will help ensure driving safely during rainy days: slow down; turn on headlights; use windshield wipers; maintain a safe distance; avoid heavy braking; watch for standing water; let off the accelerator when hydroplaning; and ventilate your car during rain.

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Southern California

Triple A: Get ready for wet, windy & winter weather

National Weather Service predicting winter weather conditions- Prepare yourself to prevent crashes on SoCal roads during strong Winter Blast

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Photo Credit: Tino Rossini

LOS ANGELES – The National Weather Service is predicting winter weather conditions, including wind, rain, and snow, for parts of Southern California, with a blizzard warning beginning Friday morning for the local mountains.

Snow could fall as low as at 1,000 to 1,500 feet elevation, impacting some Southern California streets in foothill communities. The Automobile Club of Southern California reminds drivers that traveling in winter conditions, such as snow and ice, can be challenging and dangerous, especially for those who are not accustomed to driving in freezing temperatures.

During winter weather, drivers are encouraged to stay tuned to weather forecasts prior to road trips and before driving in rural areas. Drivers should delay trips when especially bad weather is expected and follow all directions from local authorities and law enforcement. Before departing, people should let others know their intended route, destination, and estimated time of arrival.

Preparing your vehicle for driving in bad weather

  • Make sure your tires are in good condition and properly inflated, and that you have chains if you might be traveling through a snowy area. To check tire tread depth, place an upside-down quarter (not a penny) in a tire tread. If you can see the top of George’s head, it’s time to replace the tire.
  • Clear all snow and ice from the vehicle’s windows, roof, hood, trunk lid and any other covered areas. This will reduce risk because it increases your visibility. Additionally, drivers around you won’t be blinded by snow blowing off your vehicle.
  • Use an ice scraper to remove snow and ice from your windshield and all windows, including side and rear windows. This will improve your ability to see other roadway users that may move into your path of travel.
  • To increase your ability to see clearly, clean the outside and inside of your windshield at least once a week. Frequent cleaning is even more important if you smoke.
  • Keep your car’s windshield and rear-window defrosters in good working condition.
  • Keep your windshield wiper blades fresh. Many drivers change them every six months, especially before driving in bad weather.

On the road

  • If you must travel and there is a wind advisory along your route, keep extra distance from high-profile vehicles that could overturn. Be especially cautious on bridges and overpasses, as well as open areas where the wind is not obstructed. Watch for objects that could suddenly blow onto the road in front of you, but avoid slamming on your brakes, which could cause you to lose control of your vehicle.
  • Make sure your headlights are on so other vehicle drivers can easily see you.
  • Watch out for emergency workers helping stranded drivers at the roadside (EMS, police, firefighters, tow truck operators and CalTrans workers). Move out of the lane closest to them, if safe to do so. If not, slow way down.
  • Keep both hands on the wheel at all times.
  • Reduce your speed and leave plenty of room to stop. You should allow at least three times more space than usual between you and the vehicle in front of you.
  • Brake gently to avoid skidding.
  • Do not use cruise control on any wet, snow-covered, or icy roads.
  • Be aware of possible icy roads. Be especially careful on bridges and overpasses, which freeze sooner than roads. Even at temperatures above freezing, if conditions are wet, you might encounter ice in shady areas or on exposed roadways like bridges.
  • Be careful on infrequently traveled roads, which may not be cleared as often as other roads.

Leaving the roadway

  • If you must pull off the road, wait for conditions to improve and pull off the road as far as you can, preferably past the end of a guardrail.
  • It is best to pull into a rest area or parking lot, rather than on the road’s shoulder.

Know When to Brake and When to Steer

  • Some driving situations require abrupt action to avoid a crash or collision and in winter conditions the decision to steer or brake can have very different outcomes. When traveling more than 25 mph, the Auto Club recommends steering over braking to avoid a collision in winter-like conditions, as less distance is required to steer around an object than to brake to a stop. In slick conditions, sudden braking can lead to loss of vehicle control.
  • However, sometimes steering is not an option. Braking on slippery surfaces requires you to look further ahead and increase following and stopping distances. Plan stopping distances as early as possible and always look 20-30 seconds ahead of your vehicle to ensure you have time and space to stop safely.

Stay in Control Through a Skid

  • Even careful and experienced drivers can skid on slippery surfaces.  When a vehicle begins to skid, it’s important not to panic.
  • Continue to look and steer in the direction you want the car to go.
  • Avoid slamming on the brakes as this will further upset the vehicle’s balance and make it harder to control.

Additional Winter Driving Safety Tips from the Auto Club:

  • Use your seatbelt every time you get in the vehicle.
  • Never warm up a vehicle in an enclosed area, such as a garage.
  • Make sure the exhaust pipe isn’t clogged with snow, ice or mud. A blocked exhaust could cause deadly carbon monoxide gas to leak into the passenger compartment with the engine running.
  • Never leave your vehicle unattended with the engine running.
  • Keep your gas tank at least half full to avoid gas line freeze-up.

Additional information on driving in winter conditions can be found at How to Go on Ice and Snow.

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