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Southern California

Hilary downgraded to tropical storm, heavy rainfall & flooding

The tropical storm expected to produce heavy rainfall Sunday into Monday, bringing the likelihood of destructive flash flooding and mudslides

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Sunday radar image of Tropical Storm Hilary as it crosses into Southern California. (NOAA)

OXNARD, Calif. – The National Weather Service Los Angeles Area announced that Hurricane Hilary has officially been downgraded to a tropical storm with maximum winds of 70 mph and gusts up to 85 mph expected.

As of 8 a.m. Pacific time, Hilary was located about 220 miles (350 kilometers) south-southeast of San Diego, the National Hurricane Center reported. Hilary had maximum sustained winds of 70 mph (110 kph) and was moving northwest at 25 mph (41 kph).

Los Angeles Mayor Karen Bass urged residents to stay safe, stay home and stay informed so that crews can respond to emergencies as quickly and safely as possible.

“Our primary focus is to protect the life and property of Angelenos, and second, we need to keep our city workers safe,” Bass said at Sunday morning’s press conference. “Third, we must ensure that city services are operating as best as possible given the circumstances.”

Tropical Storm Hilary is expected to produce heavy rainfall in Southern California Sunday into Monday, bringing the likelihood of destructive flash flooding and mudslides. Rain totals will range from 2 to 10 inches. Strong wind gusts are also expected.

KTLA reported rain has begun falling across the entire region. Watch live Hilary radar

LAUSD Superintendent Alberto Carvalho will announce whether schools in the district will be open on Monday later in the day on Sunday, Mayor Bass said.

Fire department officials said that LAFD units are “proactively staffed” to better help with disaster response efforts.

“We have proactively staffed and augmented additional resources throughout the city that have been strategically pre-deployed within the city to ensure your safety…and reducing risk,” said LAFD Chief Kristin Crowley.

The California Highway Patrol is urging residents to stay off the roads as the storm moves through the region. Several car accidents due to poor road conditions caused by Hurricane Hilary have been reported the CHP noted.

Los Angeles County Supervisor Lindsey P. Horvath in an emailed notice noted:

I hope each of you is staying safe and taking care. This morning, Los Angeles County proclaimed a state of emergency as Hurricane Hilary makes landfall in Los Angeles as a tropical storm. As you’re experiencing, wind and rain have arrived and will increase throughout the day. This is why it’s imperative that we all stay safe by staying indoors. Please avoid all non-essential travel.

Conditions related to a tropical storm can change quickly and with little warning. Flash flooding can occur within minutes. This is why avoiding travel is the best way to stay safe.

Los Angeles County’s emergency operations center is coordinating our regional response, and our office is fully engaged and here to support our communities through this incident. For the latest updates, visit the incident response page: www.lacounty.gov/emergency

Conditions related to a tropical storm can change quickly and with little warning. Flash flooding can occur within minutes. This is why avoiding travel is the best way to stay safe.

Los Angeles County’s emergency operations center is coordinating our regional response, and our office is fully engaged and here to support our communities through this incident. For the latest updates, visit the incident response page: www.lacounty.gov/emergency

Tips:

  • Stay home and ensure any outdoor furniture or other items are secure before the rain intensifies. 
  • Make sure your emergency kit is stocked and accessible.
  • If you must drive, drive slowly and turn around if you encounter water. Please follow the advice of emergency personnel. 

Helpful contacts:

  • Downed powerline: call 9-1-1 and leave the area.
  • Report a power outage: call SCE at 1-800-611-1911.
  • Need shelter: call 2-1-1.
  • Downed tree or water in the roadway: call LA Public Works 800-676-HELP (4357). In the City of LA, call 3-1-1.

Resources to stay informed:

L.A. County Emergency Response Page – stay up to date regarding evacuations, road closures, or media releases during active storms. 

Ready Los Angeles Twitter – monitor social media for regular updates. 

Register for Emergency Alerts – Alert LA County is an opt-in mass notification program that allows individuals to receive emergency alerts by text, email and/or phone call. Please also register for your local city’s emergency alerts. 

Emergency shelter – find information on the County’s shelter program or call 2-1-1 for assistance. 

Locate your closest fire department – locate your nearest station to obtain free sandbags if needed. 

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Southern California

Triple A: SoCal gas prices continue dropping quickly

The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $4.87, which is 11 cents lower than a week ago

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Triple A Auto Club/Los Angeles Blade

LOS ANGELES – Gas prices in Southern California have dropped by more than 50 cents a gallon in most areas after two straight months of price declines, according to the Auto Club’s Weekend Gas Watch. The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $4.87, which is 11 cents lower than a week ago. The average national price is $3.46, which is two cents lower than a week ago.

The average price of self-serve regular gasoline in the Los Angeles-Long Beach area is $4.83 per gallon, which is 10 cents less than last week and 13 cents less than last year. In San Diego, the average price is $4.85, which is 10 cents lower than last week and eight cents lower than this time last year.

On the Central Coast, the average price is $4.97, which is five cents lower than last week and two cents higher than last year. In Riverside, the average per-gallon price is $4.75, which is 10 cents lower than last week and 10 cents lower than a year ago. In Bakersfield, the $4.96 average price is eight cents less than last week and nine cents higher than a year ago today.

“Oil Price Information Service reports the latest Energy Information Administration data shows that West Coast refinery utilization rates reached their highest production levels of 2024 at the beginning of this month,” said Auto Club Spokesperson Doug Shupe. “California continues to have the highest gas prices in the U.S., but this week for the first time since March, gas prices in most local areas are lower than at this time a year ago.”

The Weekend Gas Watch monitors the average price of gasoline. As of 9 a.m. on June 13, averages are:

061324

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Southern California

Triple A: Statewide gas price average drops below $5 a gallon

The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $4.98, which is 11 cents lower than a week ago

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Triple A Auto Club/Los Angeles Blade

LOS ANGELES – The California gas price average dropped below $5 a gallon for the first time since late March, according to the Auto Club’s Weekend Gas Watch. The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $4.98, which is 11 cents lower than a week ago. The average national price is $3.48, which is eight cents lower than a week ago.

The average price of self-serve regular gasoline in the Los Angeles-Long Beach area is $4.93 per gallon, which is 12 cents less than last week and the same price as last year. In San Diego, the average price is $4.95, which is 12 cents lower than last week and six cents higher than this time last year.

On the Central Coast, the average price is $5.02, which is eight cents lower than last week and 12 cents higher than last year. In Riverside, the average per-gallon price is $4.95, which is 11 cents lower than last week and three cents higher than a year ago. In Bakersfield, the $5.04 average price is eight cents less than last week and 17 cents higher than a year ago today.

“According to Oil Price Information Service, Los Angeles wholesale gasoline prices are dropping as large supplies of imported gasoline continue to arrive in Southern California,” said Auto Club Spokesperson Doug Shupe. “A few Southern California gas stations are now charging less than $4.10 a gallon for regular unleaded.”

The Weekend Gas Watch monitors the average price of gasoline. As of 9 a.m. on June 6, averages are:

060624 CA

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Southern California

‘Heat dome’ brings scorching conditions but coastal areas spared

The Los Angeles County Health Officer has issued an excessive heat warning as high temperatures have been forecast

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NWSLA/Los Angeles Blade graphic

OXNARD, Calif. – The first significant heat of the season has arrived for the interior, and is expected to last into Thursday. Temperatures will be warmest Wednesday and Thursday, with highs in the deserts from 98 to 108, and 92 to 102 for the mountains and interior valleys.

Drier conditions along with breezy conditions will lead to an increased risk for grass fires. Reduce exposure to the heat, and stay hydrated. Look before locking vehicles for children, elderly and pets. Vehicles can become dangerously hot in a short period of time. Report any wildfires to authorities.

High Temperatures Forecast for Parts of Los Angeles County

The Los Angeles County Health Officer has issued an excessive heat warning as high temperatures have been forecast for the following areas:

  • Antelope Valley: Wednesday June 05, 2024 through Thursday June 06, 2024
  • Western Antelope Valley: Wednesday June 05, 2024 through Thursday June 06, 2024
  • Eastern Antelope Valley: Wednesday June 05, 2024 through Thursday June 06, 2024

Public Health reminds everyone to take precautions to avoid heat-related illness, especially older adults, young children, outdoor workers, athletes, and people with a chronic medical condition who are especially sensitive to negative health impacts from extreme heat. Public Health offers the following recommendations during high temperature days:

  • Drink plenty of water and keep hydrated throughout the day.
  • If you must go out, plan your day to avoid going out during the hottest hours, and wear sunscreen. Wear lightweight, light-colored clothes, and wear a hat or use an umbrella.
  • Cars get very hot inside, even if the windows are ‘cracked’ or open. Never leave children or pets in cars. Call 911 if you see a child or pet in a car alone.
  • Beware of and know what to do for heat-related illness, such as heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Call 911 right away if you see these symptoms: high body temperature (103°F or higher), vomiting, dizziness, confusion, and hot, red, dry, or damp skin. Heat stroke is a medical emergency.
  • Check on those at risk for heat-related illness, like those who are sick or have chronic conditions, older adults, pregnant women, children, those who live alone, pets, and outdoor workers and athletes.
  • If you are wearing a mask, avoid strenuous workouts wearing face coverings or masks not intended for athletic purpose
  • Visit your power company’s website or contact them by phone to determine if you are scheduled for a rolling power outage.

“On hot days, it’s important for everyone to both take care of themselves and check on others, especially those who have a higher chance of getting ill due to the heat. Some of them include children, the elderly, those with health conditions, pregnant people, those living alone, and pets,” said Muntu Davis, MD, MPH, Los Angeles County Health Officer. “Hot days can be dangerous for anyone, so it’s crucial to stay cool and hydrated. Never leave children, the elderly, or pets alone in hot homes, places, or vehicles. Make sure to check on elderly or unwell neighbors and relatives regularly.” 

County and City partners have planned ways to safely operate cooling centers during times of high heat. Residents who do not have access to air conditioning are encouraged to take advantage of these free cooling centers. To find a location near you, visit https://ready.lacounty.gov/heat/ or call 211.

Los Angeles County residents and business owners, including people with disabilities and others with access and functional needs can call 2-1-1 for emergency preparedness information and other referral services. The toll-free 2-1-1 number is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. 211 LA County services can also be accessed by visiting 211la.org.

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Southern California

Triple A: Finally, some SoCal cities drop below $5 a gallon

The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $5.09, which is six cents lower than a week ago

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Triple A Auto Club/Los Angeles Blade

LOS ANGELES – Six straight weeks of price drops at Southern California gas stations have pushed average prices below $5 a gallon in a few cities, according to the Auto Club’s Weekend Gas Watch. The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $5.09, which is six cents lower than a week ago. The average national price is $3.56, which is four cents lower than a week ago.

The average price of self-serve regular gasoline in the Los Angeles-Long Beach area is $5.05 per gallon, which is six cents less than last week and 12 cents higher than last year. In San Diego, the average price is $5.07, which is six cents lower than last week and 17 cents higher than this time last year.

On the Central Coast, the average price is $5.10, which is six cents lower than last week and 21 cents higher than last year. In Riverside, the average per-gallon price is $4.96, which is six cents lower than last week and 13 cents higher than a year ago. In Bakersfield, the $5.12 average price is five cents less than last week and 29 cents higher than a year ago today.

“Oil Price Information Service reports that wholesale Los Angeles gasoline prices are continuing to drop because of increased availability of imported gasoline and reportedly lower levels of demand compared to last year,” said Auto Club Spokesperson Doug Shupe. “Those factors should help pump price drops to continue for now.”

The Weekend Gas Watch monitors the average price of gasoline. As of 9 a.m. on May 30, averages are:

socal blue gas chart May 30

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Southern California

Triple A: Memorial Day travelers get a break at the pump

The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $5.15, which is nine cents lower than a week ago

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Triple A Auto Club/Los Angeles Blade

LOS ANGELES – Gas prices continued downward for a fifth straight week, giving some Southern California Memorial Day travelers the chance to fill up for about $4.50 a gallon or even less in a few areas, according to the Auto Club’s Weekend Gas Watch. The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $5.15, which is nine cents lower than a week ago. The average national price is $3.61, which is one cent higher than a week ago.

The average price of self-serve regular gasoline in the Los Angeles-Long Beach area is $5.11 per gallon, which is ten cents less than last week, 27 cents less than last month, and 25 cents higher than last year. In San Diego, the average price is $5.13, which is ten cents lower than last week, 23 cents lower than last month, and 29 cents higher than this time last year.

On the Central Coast, the average price is $5.16, which is five cents lower than last week, 17 cents lower than last month, and 30 cents higher than last year. In Riverside, the average per-gallon price is $5.02, which is ten cents lower than last week, 28 cents lower than last month and 25 cents higher than a year ago. In Bakersfield, the $5.17 average price is five cents less than last week, 15 cents less than last month, and 36 cents higher than a year ago today.

“With an all-time record number of Southern California travelers expected for this Memorial Day getaway weekend, the gas price drops are providing some welcome relief,” said Auto Club Spokesperson Doug Shupe. “Those travelers who are planning out-of-state trips should expect to pay even less when they fuel up for their return, since California continues to be the only U.S. state with a gas price average above $5 a gallon.”

The Weekend Gas Watch monitors the average price of gasoline. As of 9 a.m. on May 23, averages are:

052324 FINAL CHART CA

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Southern California

Triple A: Gas prices drop for four straight weeks

The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $5.24, which is eight cents lower than a week ago

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Triple A Auto Club/Los Angeles Blade

LOS ANGELES – Local gas prices have dropped for four straight weeks, but California continues to be the only state with an average price above $5 a gallon, according to the Auto Club’s Weekend Gas Watch. The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $5.24, which is eight cents lower than a week ago. The average national price is $3.60, which is four cents lower than a week ago.

The average price of self-serve regular gasoline in the Los Angeles-Long Beach area is $5.21 per gallon, which is eight cents less than last week, 18 cents less than last month, and 37 cents higher than last year. In San Diego, the average price is $5.23, which is six cents lower than last week, 14 cents lower than last month, and 41 cents higher than this time last year.

On the Central Coast, the average price is $5.22, which is five cents lower than last week, 14 cents lower than last month, and 38 cents higher than last year. In Riverside, the average per-gallon price is $5.12, which is eight cents lower than last week, 19 cents lower than last month and 36 cents higher than a year ago. In Bakersfield, the $5.23 average price is three cents less than last week, eight cents less than last month, and 40 cents higher than a year ago today.

“California continues to have the highest average gas prices in the U.S., and despite a month of price declines, the state average price is still more than 40 cents higher than Hawaii, which is the second most expensive state for fuel,” said Auto Club Spokesperson Doug Shupe.

The Weekend Gas Watch monitors the average price of gasoline. As of 9 a.m. on May 16, averages are:

051624 Final

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Southern California

Triple A: Gas prices head down for third straight week

The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $5.32, which is six cents lower than a week ago

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Triple A Auto Club/Los Angeles Blade

LOS ANGELES – Southern California gas prices have dropped for the third straight week, according to the Auto Club’s Weekend Gas Watch. The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $5.32, which is six cents lower than a week ago. The average national price is $3.64, which is three cents lower than a week ago.

The average price of self-serve regular gasoline in the Los Angeles-Long Beach area is $5.28 per gallon, which is six cents less than last week, six cents less than last month, and 42 cents higher than last year. In San Diego, the average price is $5.29, which is five cents lower than last week, five cents lower than last month, and 44 cents higher than this time last year.

On the Central Coast, the average price is $5.27, which is six cents lower than last week, two cents lower than last month, and 41 cents higher than last year. In Riverside, the average per-gallon price is $5.20, which is seven cents lower than last week, five cents lower than last month and 43 cents higher than a year ago. In Bakersfield, the $5.26 average price is four cents less than last week, five cents more than last month, and 42 cents higher than a year ago today.

“According to Oil Price Information Service (OPIS), California and all West Coast refineries are continuing to operate at higher capacities and West Coast gasoline inventories are increasing in anticipation of higher summer demand,” said Auto Club Spokesperson Doug Shupe.

The Weekend Gas Watch monitors the average price of gasoline. As of 9 a.m. on May 9, averages are:

050924 gas chart

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Southern California

Triple A: SoCal gas prices continue downward

The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $5.38, which is three cents lower than a week ago

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Triple A Auto Club/Los Angeles Blade

LOS ANGELES – Southern California gas prices are continuing to drop for a second straight week, according to the Auto Club’s Weekend Gas Watch. The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $5.38, which is three cents lower than a week ago. The average national price is $3.67, which is one cent higher than a week ago.

The average price of self-serve regular gasoline in the Los Angeles-Long Beach area is $5.34 per gallon, which is three cents less than last week, 18 cents higher than last month, and 44 cents higher than last year. In San Diego, the average price is $5.34, which is two cents lower than last week, 19 cents higher than last month, and 45 cents higher than this time last year.

On the Central Coast, the average price is $5.33, which is the same as last week, 22 cents higher than last month, and 45 cents higher than last year. In Riverside, the average per-gallon price is $5.27, which is two cents lower than last week, 21 cents higher than last month and 45 cents higher than a year ago. In Bakersfield, the $5.30 average price is one cent less than last week, 29 cents more than last month, and 44 cents higher than a year ago today.

“After a few months of supply interruptions from refinery breakdowns and maintenance, Oil Price Information Service (OPIS) reports that California refineries have been operating at above 86% of their capacity for the past two weeks,” said Auto Club Spokesperson Doug Shupe. “Additionally, OPIS reported the US Energy Information Administration believes that the country has already experienced its highest gas price point for the first half of this year. Although California prices often go against national trends, that prediction is an encouraging sign for further price drops at the pump.”

The Weekend Gas Watch monitors the average price of gasoline. As of 9 a.m. on May 2, averages are:

050224 final

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Southern California

Triple A: Southern California gas prices begin to slowly decrease

The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $5.41, which is four cents lower than a week ago

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Triple A Auto Club/Los Angeles Blade

LOS ANGELES – Southern California gas prices slightly decrease in almost every metro city, according to the Auto Club’s Weekend Gas Watch. The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $5.41, which is four cents lower than a week ago. The average national price is $3.66, which is also one cent higher than a week ago.

The average price of self-serve regular gasoline in the Los Angeles-Long Beach area is $5.37 per gallon, which is two cents less than last week, 33 cents higher than last month, and 44 cents higher than last year. In San Diego, the average price is $5.36, which is two cents lower than last week, 34 cents higher than last month, and 45 cents higher than this time last year.

On the Central Coast, the average price is $5.33, which is two cents lower than last week, 31 cents higher than last month, and 43 cents higher than last year. In Riverside, the average per-gallon price is $5.29, which is three cents lower than last week, 37 cents higher than last month, and 45 cents higher than a year ago. In Bakersfield, the $5.31 average price is the same as last week, 40 cents more than last month, and 43 cents higher than a year ago today.

“For the first time in almost two months prices in Southern California have slightly decreased,” said Auto Club Spokesperson Doug Shupe. “The reasons for gas prices moving lower include slowing domestic gasoline demand between Spring Break and summer travel, as well as the cost of crude oil retreating.” 

The Weekend Gas Watch monitors the average price of gasoline. As of 9 a.m. on April 25, averages are:

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Southern California

Bonta files for permanent ban of Chino school’s forced outing policy

Bonta noted that the policy was detrimental to the physical, emotional safety, well-being, & privacy of trans students

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California Attorney General Rob Bonta along with California's Secretary of State Shirley N. Weber at a April, 2024 Sacramento press conference. (Photo Credit: Office of the Attorney General/Facebook)

OAKLAND, Calif. — California Attorney General Rob Bonta today filed a motion for final judgment in Bonta v. Chino Valley Unified School District seeking injunctive and declaratory relief to ensure that the Chino Valley Unified School District Board of Education (Board) does not reenact or implement their recently-rescinded forced outing policy.

In a press release, the Attorney General noted that the policy – Policy 5020.1 – was detrimental to the physical and emotional safety, well-being, and privacy of transgender and gender-nonconforming students.

In August 2023, Attorney General Bonta sued to challenge the policy on the basis that it violated students’ civil and constitutional rights under California law, and in October 2023, obtained a preliminary injunction enjoining the facially discriminatory provisions of the forced outing policy. While the District voted to rescind the forced outing policy on March 7, 2024, in response to the San Bernardino County Superior Court’s preliminary injunction order, the District’s Board continues to stand “proudly” by Policy 5020.1, the District’s counsel continues to maintain that it was “common sense and constitutional,” and the District continues to make comments echoing the anti-trans comments they made publicly before enacting the policy.

As a result, Attorney General Bonta is seeking a permanent injunction and declaratory relief to protect students’ civil rights and ensure that the Board does not reenact or implement its original, discriminatory policy.   

“Chino Valley Unified has an obligation to protect the safety and well-being of the students it is charged to serve, especially our most vulnerable student communities who are susceptible to violence and harassment,” said Attorney General Bonta. “It took a lawsuit and court order to get Chino Valley to rescind their discriminatory forced outing policy, but even now, the Board has continued to assert that it was lawful, and board members continue to echo the anti-trans rhetoric they relied upon when passing it. Today’s motion seeks to ensure no child becomes a target again by blocking Chino Valley Unified from ever adopting another forced outing policy. As we continue to defend the rights of transgender and gender-nonconforming students, I urge all school districts to take note and ensure every student can enjoy their right to learn and thrive in a school environment that promotes safety, privacy, and inclusivity.”

Even though Attorney General Bonta issued a letter to the Board on July 20, 2023 stressing the potential harms and infringements on students’ civil rights from the adoption of Board Policy 5020.1, the Board enacted the policy nonetheless. The forced outing policy required schools to inform parents, with minimal exceptions, whenever a student requested to use a name or pronoun different from that on their birth certificate or official records, even without the student’s permission and even when disclosure would cause physical or mental harm to the student.

The policy also required notification if a student requested to use facilities or participate in programs that did not align with their sex on official records. In August 2023, Attorney General Bonta announced a lawsuit challenging the enforcement of Policy 5020.1, asserting it violated several state protections safeguarding students’ civil and constitutional rights.

Shortly after securing a temporary restraining order, the San Bernardino Superior Court issued a preliminary injunction against the Board’s forced outing policy in October 2023. The Court held that several provisions violated California’s equal protection clause and discriminated against transgender and gender-nonconforming students, causing them irreparable harm.

In today’s motion seeking a permanent injunction and declaratory relief against the forced outing policy, Attorney General Bonta underscores the importance of the Court’s issuance of final adjudication to guarantee the safety and well-being of transgender and gender-nonconforming students from future identical or similar forced outing policies, and declare that the forced outing policy violates students’ constitutional and statutory rights to be free from unequal and discriminatory treatment on the basis of sex, gender, and gender identity.  

As part of today’s motion, Attorney General Bonta urges the Court to issue a final judgment because a live controversy exists, as the District’s conduct signals that it could re-adopt the discriminatory policy absent a final ruling by the Court, the discriminatory message communicated by the enactment of a discriminatory policy must still be redressed, and the case presents clear issues of public interest broadly affecting students, parents, school officials, and teachers that are likely to recur.

The Attorney General underscores the importance of securing final injunctive and declaratory relief against Policy 5020.1 to:

  • Prevent the Board from re-enacting the discriminatory forced outing policy in the absence of a final injunction.
  • Provide relief against the stigmatic harms inflicted by the Board’s adoption of the forced outing policy.
  • Declare that the Board’s forced outing policy violates California’s equal protection and antidiscrimination laws.

Today’s motion also asserts the Board’s plain motivations in adopting Policy 5020.1 were to create and harbor animosity, discrimination, and prejudice towards transgender and gender-nonconforming students, without any compelling reason to do so, as evidenced by statements made during the Board’s hearing.

In discussing the policy before its passage, board members made a number of statements describing students who are transgender or gender-nonconforming as suffering from a “mental illness” or “perversion”, or as being a threat to the integrity of the nation and the family. The Board President went so far as to state that transgender and gender nonconforming individuals needed “non-affirming” parental actions so that they could “get better.”

The Attorney General has a substantial interest in protecting the legal rights, physical safety, and mental health of children in California schools, and in protecting them from trauma, harassment, bullying, and exposure to violence and threats of violence. Research shows that protecting a transgender student’s ability to make choices about how and when to inform others is critical to their well-being, as transgender students are exposed to high levels of harassment and mistreatment at school and in their communities when those environments are not supportive of their gender identity. 

  • One-in-10 respondents in a 2015 national survey said that an immediate family member had been violent toward them because they were transgender, and 15% ran away from home or were kicked out of their home because they were transgender. Fewer than one-in-three transgender and gender nonbinary youth found their home to be gender-affirming.
  • Nearly 46% of transgender students reported missing at least one day of school in the preceding month because they felt unsafe or uncomfortable there and 17% of transgender students reported that they left a K-12 school due to the severity of the harassment they experienced at school.
  • Seventy-seven percent of students known or perceived as transgender reported negative experiences such as harassment and assault, and over half of transgender and nonbinary youth reported seriously considering suicide in the past year. 

A copy of the motion seeking declaratory and injunctive relief is available here.

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