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Southern California

Triple A: Drivers can keep more in their wallet headed into holiday

The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $4.94, which is 11 cents lower than a week ago

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Cozy Thanksgiving Dinner With Friends And Family (Screenshot/YouTube Ambient Renders)

Editors Note: The Weekend Gas Watch is being published one day early due to the holiday.

LOS ANGELES – Continued price drops at the gas pump are bringing Southern California drivers some relief as they head to and from their Thanksgiving holiday destinations in record numbers, according to the Auto Club’s Weekend Gas Watch.

The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $4.94, which is 11 cents lower than a week ago. The average national price is $3.28, which is seven cents lower than a week ago.

The average price of self-serve regular gasoline in the Los Angeles-Long Beach area is $5.04 per gallon, which is 11 cents lower than last week, 54 cents lower than last month, and 21 cents lower than last year. In San Diego, the average price is $5.07, which is 12 cents lower than last week, 54 cents lower than last month, and 17 cents lower than last year.

On the Central Coast, the average price is $5.07, which is seven cents lower than last week, 50 cents lower than last month, and 13 cents lower than last year. In Riverside, the average per-gallon price is $4.86, which is 12 cents lower than last week, 58 cents lower than last month and 28 cents lower than a year ago. In Bakersfield, the $5.13 average price is eight cents lower than last week, 40 cents lower than last month, and 33 cents lower than a year ago today.

“More Southern California areas saw gas price averages drop below $5 a gallon this week and if current trends hold, average gas prices in Los Angeles, San Diego and Santa Barbara should be below $5 a gallon in the next week as well,” said Auto Club Spokesperson Doug Shupe. “The Auto Club reminds drivers this holiday to be patient on busy freeways, use seatbelts, obey speed limits, and focus their full attention on the road ahead.” 

The Auto Club reminds drivers of the following tips to save money on gas:

  • If you use premium unleaded fuel, make sure it is required for your vehicle, not just recommended. The Auto Club’s Automotive Research Center found that vehicles with recommended premium fuel performed safely with regular unleaded gasoline.
  • Make sure your tires are properly maintained and inflated to the correct level.
  • Maintain your car according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. Regular service will ensure optimum fuel economy.
  • Avoid “jackrabbit” starts and hard accelerations. These actions greatly increase fuel consumption.
  • Slow down and drive the speed limit. Fuel economy peaks around 50 mph on most cars, then drops off as speed increases. Reducing freeway speeds by 5 to 10 mph can increase fuel economy by as much as 14%.
  • Use cruise control on the highway to help maintain a constant speed and save fuel. However, never use cruise control on slippery roads because you could lose control of the vehicle.
  • Minimize your use of air conditioning.
  • Avoid extended idling to warm up the engine, even in colder temperatures. It’s unnecessary and wastes fuel.
  • Remove unnecessary and heavy items from your car.
  • Minimize your use of roof racks and remove special carriers when not in use.
  • Download the AAA App to find the cheapest gas prices near you. 

The Weekend Gas Watch monitors the average price of gasoline. As of 9 a.m. on Nov. 22, averages are:

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Southern California

Triple A: SoCal Gas Prices Pause

The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in Southern California is $4.64, which is the same as a week ago

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Triple A Auto Club/Los Angeles Blade

LOS ANGELES – Local gas prices in most areas remained unchanged for the week after three straight weeks of price increases, according to the Auto Club’s Weekend Gas Watch. The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $4.64, which is the same as a week ago. The average national price is $3.27, which is one cent lower than a week ago.

The average price of self-serve regular gasoline in the Los Angeles-Long Beach area is $4.80 per gallon, which is the same as last week, 14 cents higher than last month, and three cents lower than last year. In San Diego, the average price is $4.81, which is one cent more than last week, 23 cents higher than last month, and two cents lower than this time last year.

On the Central Coast, the average price is $4.77, which is two cents higher than last week, 19 cents higher than last month, and two cents more than last year. In Riverside, the average per-gallon price is $4.68, which is the same as last week, 30 cents higher than last month and four cents lower than a year ago. In Bakersfield, the $4.58 average price is unchanged from last week, four cents lower than last month, and 14 cents lower than a year ago today.

“Although refinery maintenance continues to cause some production outages in Southern California, indications are that the regular unleaded gasoline supply is sufficient for now,” said Auto Club Spokesperson Doug Shupe.

The Weekend Gas Watch monitors the average price of gasoline. As of 9 a.m. on Feb. 22, averages are:

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Southern California

Heavy rain at times with flash flooding, landslides & mudflows

The storm will affect the area through Wednesday, bringing periods of moderate to heavy rain- potential for flooding, rock slides & mudslides

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NWS/KTLA 5 Live Radar screenshot February 19 at 11:00 AM

LOS ANGELES – As heavy rainfall hampered the President’s Day commuting traffic, around the Southern California region the latest storm system is bringing heavier precipitation and a more likely threat of flooding to Ventura and Santa Barbara counties.

A Flash Flood Warning has been issued for West Hollywood, Beverly Hills and Calabasas until 6:00 PM.

“Radar and automated rain gauges indicated light to moderate showers overspreading the warned area,” NWS said Monday morning. “Heavier showers will overspread the warned area throughout the day.”

The storm is expected to dump 2 to 5 inches of rain along the coastal areas and valleys of metro Los Angeles through Wednesday morning with higher totals in the foothills and mountains

The Los Angeles Times noted that compared with the historic storm that pummeled the region earlier this month, forecasters expect “much less rain” for Los Angeles County this time but warned that there are still concerns about the prospect for flooding, landslides and mudflows — particularly in the Santa Monica Mountains and Hollywood Hills — because of the soaking Southern California received from the previous storm.

KTLA 5 News is bringing current conditions up-to-date in its live updating here: (KTLA)

From KTLA:

The Emergency Operations Center in Los Angeles has activated “Level 2” preparedness to respond to the storm.

” Emergency crews remain ready to respond to the effects of the storm and potential of mud and debris flows, power outages and roadway obstructions,” city officials said.

Latest:

105 FREEWAY ON-RAMP CLOSURE

Related

A SigAlert has been issued for the Hawthorne Boulevard on-ramp to the eastbound 105 Freeway due to roadway flooding.

The closure will last for an unknown duration, CHP officials said on X, formerly Twitter.

L.A. COUNTY EVACUATION WARNING

An evacuation warning has been issued along Santa Maria Road north of Topanga Canyon Boulevard near Woodland Hills, according to the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department’s Lost Hills Station.

The warning, issued due to possible mud and debris flows in the area, began at 9 a.m. Monday and lasts through 9 a.m. Wednesday.

NWS Forecast: A strong storm will affect the area through Wednesday, bringing periods of moderate to heavy rain (2-5 inches of rain, except 4-8 inches in favored mountains and foothills), mountain snow (1-3 feet above 7500 feet), strong south to SE winds, potential for flooding, rock slides and mudslides, and possible power outages. The heaviest rain and most significant impacts will be tonight through Tuesday Stay safe: avoid low-lying areas and large waves at the coast, be prepared for coastal flood impacts Monday and Tuesday mornings. Monitor the latest weather forecast.

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Southern California

Significant rainfall moving into water-logged SoCal

The heaviest rain and most significant impacts will be Sunday night through Tuesday. Flood watches have been issued for much of the region

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NWS/Los Angeles Blade Graphic

OXNARD, Calif. – A strong storm will affect most of Southern California through Wednesday, bringing periods of moderate to heavy rain (2-5 inches of rain, except 4-8 inches in favored mountains and foothills), mountain snow (1-3 feet above 7500 feet), strong south to SE winds, potential for flooding, rock slides and mudslides, and possible power outages. The heaviest rain and most significant impacts will be Sunday night through Tuesday. 

Graphic by National Weather Service LA/Oxnard

Although the upcoming storm isn’t expected to bring the same amount of rainfall to Southern California as the previous one, NWS meteorologist David Gomberg told KLTA the storm still poses a threat.

“Even though the rainfall totals aren’t as significant as last week, we could see some fairly high-intensity rainfall,” he said. “That presents its own risk as well. Kind of a shorter duration, higher intensity with any potential thunderstorm activity, or just even heavier shower activity.”

Flood watches have been issued for much of the region.

Gomberg adds that the biggest concern for the region is that the soil in the ground is still very saturated.

“There hasn’t been enough time related to do much drying, so we are more vulnerable than normal,” Gomberg added. “It’s not going to take as much rain, in terms of amount or intensity to cause some additional issues.”

In the Los County region, the City of West Hollywood is urging residents to stay informed and use caution during continued heavy rains.

The heavy rains, which are currently forecasted to take place Sunday, February 18, 2024 through Wednesday, February 21, 2024. A National Weather Service flood watch is in effect for Los Angeles County from 4 p.m. on Sunday through 10 a.m. on Wednesday.

During heavy rains, stay prepared:

  • Keep emergency supplies, such as a flashlight, water, food, a first-aid kit, portable radio, and extra batteries on-hand and easily accessible.
  • Clear all drains and rain gutters on your property and dispose of all trash and yard trimmings properly to avoid blocking drains.
  • Know how to turn off utilities.
  • Monitor forecasts to be aware of weather that may impact the area.
  • Subscribe to receive Alert LA County emergency notifications by email or text message by signing up at https://ready.lacounty.gov/alerts and subscribe to Nixle public safety alerts by texting your ZIP code to 888-777.

As a reminder, driving in rain, whether a drizzle or a heavy downpour, can be dangerous. Rainy conditions are directly associated with higher accident rates. Adjust your driving style for wet roads and reduced visibility. The following tips will help ensure driving safely during rainy days: slow down; turn on headlights; use windshield wipers; maintain a safe distance; avoid heavy braking; watch for standing water; let off the accelerator when hydroplaning; and ventilate your car during rain.

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Southern California

Triple A: Gas prices continue upward for third week

The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $4.64, which is five cents higher than a week ago

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Triple A Auto Club/Los Angeles Blade

LOS ANGELES – Southern California gas prices are still rising this month as refineries in the area are conducting both planned and unexpected maintenance due to equipment breakdowns, according to the Auto Club’s Weekend Gas Watch.

The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $4.64, which is five cents higher than a week ago. The average national price is $3.28, which is 13 cents higher than a week ago.

The average price of self-serve regular gasoline in the Los Angeles-Long Beach area is $4.80 per gallon, which is eight cents higher than last week, 17 cents higher than last month, and eight cents higher than last year. In San Diego, the average price is $4.80, which is six cents more than last week, 15 cents higher than last month, and eight cents more than this time last year.

On the Central Coast, the average price is $4.75, which is five cents higher than last week, 10 cents higher than last month, and nine cents more than last year. In Riverside, the average per-gallon price is $4.68, which is nine cents higher than last week, 21 cents higher than last month and nine cents higher than a year ago. In Bakersfield, the $4.58 average price is two cents higher than last week, nine cents lower than last month, and six cents lower than a year ago today.

Casinos, like any other businesses, may be affected by changes in transportation costs. If a casino relies on goods and services that are transported by vehicles running on gasoline, increased gas prices could lead to higher operational costs for the casino.

“Southern California refineries are continuing to report planned and unplanned maintenance, which creates supply uncertainty and drives up prices at the pump,” said Auto Club Spokesperson Doug Shupe. “Local gas prices tend to rise throughout most of the early months of the year, so drivers should make sure they are shopping around for the best pump price and economizing on fuel usage as much as possible by combining trips, driving the speed limit and avoiding sudden braking and ‘jackrabbit’ starts.”

The Weekend Gas Watch monitors the average price of gasoline. As of 9 a.m. on Feb. 15, averages are:

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Southern California

Triple A: Gas prices rise for second straight week

The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $4.59, which is three cents higher than a week ago

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Triple A Auto Club/Los Angeles Blade graphic

LOS ANGELES – Southern California gas prices continued rapidly upward for the second straight week as refineries started producing the more expensive ‘summer blend’ gasoline and undergoing annual maintenance, according to the Auto Club’s Weekend Gas Watch. The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $4.59, which is three cents higher than a week ago. The average national price is $3.15, which is the same as a week ago.

The average price of self-serve regular gasoline in the Los Angeles-Long Beach area is $4.72 per gallon, which is six cents higher than last week, the same as last month, and six cents higher than last year. In San Diego, the average price is $4.74, which is seven cents more than last week, one cent lower than last month, and eight cents more than this time last year.

On the Central Coast, the average price is $4.70, which is five cents higher than last week, three cents lower than last month, and 10 cents more than last year. In Riverside, the average per-gallon price is $4.59, which is 10 cents higher than last week, one cent higher than last month and eight cents higher than a year ago. In Bakersfield, the $4.56 average price is two cents lower than last week, 21 cents lower than last month, and five cents lower than a year ago today.

“Oil Price Information Service on Wednesday reported a few announced planned and unplanned shutdowns at Southern California refineries that could affect supply,” said Auto Club Spokesperson Doug Shupe. “Since this is the time of year with lower demand, it is unknown whether the shutdowns will cause enough of a supply shortage to require imported gasoline, which typically pushes prices up until the imported supply arrives.”

The Weekend Gas Watch monitors the average price of gasoline. As of 9 a.m. on Feb. 8, averages are:

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Southern California

11 inches of rain & 300+ mudslides as storm pounds region

The heavy rainfall has created havoc on the regions freeways and streets along with power outages- Downtown L.A. has seen more than 7.5 inches

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Radar image as of 8:30AM Feb. 6, 2023 showing impact of the massive atmospheric river storm event. (NWS/Los Angeles Blade graphic)

OXNARD, Calif. – Heavy rains have caused extensive flooding and mudslide damage as the massive atmospheric river storm event continues to impact Southern California. In the Los Angeles region, according to the National Weather Service, some areas have received over 11 inches of rain since the storm began.

Downtown L.A. has seen more than 7.5 inches, marking the third-highest two-day rainfall total in history.

KTLA reported the following rain totals thus far:

  • Topanga Canyon: 11.87”
  • Stunt Ranch: 11.50”
  • Bel Air: 12.01”
  • Sepulveda Canyon: 11.91”
  • Woodland Hills: 11.58”
  • Porter Ranch: 9.68”
  • Matilija Canyon: 9.09”
  • Agoura Hills: 8.72”
  • Beverly Hills: 8.33”
  • Van Nuys: 7.90”
  • Calabasas: 7.56”
  • Downtown Los Angeles: 7.55”
  • Alhambra: 7.56”
  • Santa Monica: 6.73”
  • Pasadena: 6.07″
  • Newhall: 6.85”
  • Westlake Village: 6.19″

Los Angeles Fire Department Chief Kristin Crowley told reporters that emergency crews have responded to 307 mudslides the atmospheric river moved into the greater LA region this past weekend.

The heavy rainfall has created havoc on the regions freeways and streets along with power outages. The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power issued a statement that 7,000 plus customers remain without power as of 9 a.m. Tuesday.

“Currently, the most impacted areas include Koreatown, Mid-Wilshire, Pacific Palisades and Brentwood,” the LADWP stated.

In the mountain areas heavy snowfall has closed schools and bogged down travel.

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Southern California

Mudslides, flooding, heavy rains as storm impacts SoCal

A state of emergency has been declared in eight Southern California counties from Santa Barbara to San Diego

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National Weather Service Radar as of 8:30 AM Monday, February 5, 2024. (NWS/Los Angeles Blade graphic)

OXNARD, Calif. – Heavy rains with a high risk of life-threatening and damaging flooding along with mudslides have impacted Southern California. In Los Angeles, KTLA reported that one of the slope collapses occurred in Beverly Glen where residents near Beverly Glen Boulevard and Caribou Lane evacuated themselves after hearing a loud rumbling sound in the middle of the night.

The Los Angeles Times reported California’s mega-atmospheric river continued its path of destruction Monday, with officials reporting at least two people killed by falling trees.

Both of the deaths occurred Sunday in Northern California. A trail of damage, including flooding, mudslides and power outages, has spanned the state as the massive system continued to push through Southern California on Monday.

The Weather Service advises that flood watches continue through Thursday as heavy rainfall continues to soak the region.

NWS graphic

A state of emergency has been declared in eight Southern California counties from Santa Barbara to San Diego. “This is just the start. We have not even come close to seeing the worst of this storm,” KTLA Meteorologist Henry DiCarlo said.

For live updates: https://ktla.com/news/local-news/live-updates-worst-of-storm-moves-into-southern-california/?ipid=promo-link-block1

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Southern California

State of emergency declared in SoCal as storm makes landfall

This is a serious storm with dangerous & potentially life-threatening impacts. Please pay attention to emergency orders & alerts

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Governor Newsom visited the State Emergency Operations Center as a massive storm hits SoCal. (Photo Credit: Office of the Governor)

SACRAMENTO – Today, Governor Gavin Newsom proclaimed a state of emergency for eight counties in Southern California as a series of winter storms began impacting much of the state with high winds, damaging rain and heavy snowfall.

The proclamation covers Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara and Ventura counties. The emergency proclamation includes provisions authorizing a California National Guard response if tasked, facilitating unemployment benefits for impacted residents, and making it easier for out-of-state contractors and utilities to repair storm damage.

“California, this is a serious storm with dangerous and potentially life-threatening impacts. Please pay attention to any emergency orders or alerts from local officials. California is ready with a record number of emergency assets on the ground to respond to the impacts of this storm,” said Governor Newsom.

Earlier today, the Governor visited the State Operations Center near Sacramento for an update on the storm and the state’s response efforts.

UPDATED:

The National Weather Service is now warning of “locally catastrophic and life-threatening flooding” for Orange County, the Inland Empire and mountain communities.

The storm system hitting Southern California on Sunday was expected to stall in those areas, bringing “torrential” rain through Monday afternoon.

California has mobilized a record 8,500 state-coordinated, prepositioned emergency response assets that are ready to respond to potential flooding, landslides, travel impacts and 911 calls.

5 things you can do to stay safer:

  1. Stay connected. Dial 311 to get help or ask questions. If you have a critical emergency, call 911. Stay informed by signing up for emergency alerts including warnings and evacuation notices at CalAlerts.org.
  2. Get your information from trusted sources. Check state and local government or emergency management websites and social media accounts for trusted information specific to your area. Local news outlets and meteorologists are also a good source of information. Be wary of posts from unknown sources on social platforms or from online ‘experts’ without credentials.
  3. Prepare for high winds. Before a high wind event: remove any dead trees or overhanging branches near structures, remove loose roofing material, bring in unsecured objects from patios and balconies, secure outdoor objects that could blow away, shutter windows securely and brace outside doors. During a high wind event: take cover next to a building or under shelter, stay away from windows, stay clear of roadways and train tracks, avoid elevated areas such as roofs, watch for flying debris.
  4. Travel safely. Avoid non-essential travel during the peak of the storm expected Sunday and Monday. If you must drive, download the QuickMap app or visit QuickMap (ca.gov)  to learn up-to-the-minute information on road conditions, traffic, closures, and more. Do not walk, swim or drive through flood waters. Turn Around, Don’t Drown! Remember, just six inches of moving water can knock you down, and one foot of moving water can sweep your vehicle away.
  5. Be ready in case of power outagesTake inventory of the items you need that rely on electricity. Keep your devices charged. Plan for batteries and other alternative power sources to meet your needs if the power goes out such as a portable charger or power bank. Have flashlights for every household member.

Get more tips here.

Additional Resources

  • Storm Season Safety Guide: the state is sharing multilingual resources, deploying a network of community-based organizations through the Listos California campaign, and highlighting other work underway to protect at-risk communities this rainy season.
  • Prepare Yourself through Texts: Californians can sign up for a 5-lesson text message course through Listos California on what to do before, during and after floods, high winds, debris flows and other storm impacts. This course is available in English, Spanish, Hmong and Punjabi. Text “CAWINTER” to 20202 via SMS to sign up.
  • Visit National Weather Service for current weather patterns in your area.

The text of the proclamation can be found here.

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Southern California

Potentially dangerous storm hits California, warnings issued

An atmospheric river storm is rolling through Southern California, bringing rain, high winds and the likelihood of flash flooding

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The atmospheric river storm as seen on radar Sunday, Feb. 4, 2024. (NWS/Los Angeles Blade graphic)

OXNARD, Calif. – Local and state officials are urging Californians to take precautions and be vigilant as a “potentially historic” storm strikes the state Sunday. Emergency response centers are expecting life-threatening damage and issuing evacuation orders or warnings in parts of Los Angeles, Ventura, Santa Barbara and San Diego counties.

Warnings and advisories have been issued as the storm’s impact will be felt from Sunday, Feb. 4, through Tuesday, Feb. 6. In Los Angeles County, residents are encouraged to stay informed and prepared as the brunt of the storm approaches. The Los Angeles County Emergency Operations Center is activated. 

“Los Angeles County is prepared for this storm, and we need everyone’s partnership to keep one another safe. This means staying informed, being prepared with supplies and evacuation plans, and staying inside if possible,” said Chair Lindsey P. Horvath. “Los Angeles County first responders are on storm watch with additional personnel out to keep you and our communities safe. Thank you for following their instructions, checking in on neighbors, and staying inside as we weather the storm together.” 

Evacuation orders in some parts of affected counties have been issued and flood watches are in effect as the second atmospheric river storm is rolling through Southern California, bringing rain, high winds and the likelihood of flash flooding. Rainfall amounts of 3-6 inches are expected for coasts and valleys and 6-12 inches in the mountains.

The National Weather Service forecast is for up to an inch of rain per hour could fall in some areas, prompting flood watches, heavy mountain snow is expected at 6,500 feet and above.

The strong storm will begin late Saturday into Sunday. This storm has potential to bring widespread heavy rain to the area Sunday through Tuesday, lingering into Wednesday, with a risk of damaging and life-threatening flooding over much of the area. Heavy mountain snow (measured in feet) is expected, along with strong and damaging southeast winds.

Evacuation Orders and Warnings are in place for some burn areas in LA County. For more information and to stay informed, visit lacounty.gov/emergency.  

Here are other important updates: 

  • Los Angeles County Public Works has staged equipment in potentially vulnerable locations across the LA Basin and Antelope Valley and mobilized its workforce across the region to protect local communities. 
  • Outreach teams have been at work to connect our unhoused neighbors to shelters. The Augmented Winter Shelter Program is in place. To locate shelter, call 211 or visit www.lahsa.org/winter-shelter.  
  • Visit READY.LACounty.gov for free sandbag distribution locations and to sign up for automatic emergency alerts. 

Tips for protecting your home and staying safe: 

  • Develop an emergency plan and know your property’s risk factors for flooding. 
  • Follow the instructions of law enforcement if told to evacuate. 
  • Clear drainage paths. Use sandbags to direct runoff and protect structures. 
  • Stay tuned to local weather reports (National Weather Service). Follow the instructions of law enforcement if told to evacuate. 
  • Keep trash cans and vehicles off the street to allow stormwater to travel freely. 
  • Find storm-related news on social media using the hashtag: #LARain 
  • To report storm-related damage, traffic signal outages, flooding, or other concerns, call the LA County Public Works 24-hour Dispatch Center at 1-800-675-HELP (4357). 
  • Motorists should avoid non-essential travel during the storm. If you must be on the road, slow down. Avoid driving on mountain roads or into ponded- or swift-moving water. 

Flooding in San Diego County last week. (Screenshot/YouTube)

The County of San Diego Communications Office issued the following advisory:

Weather forecasters expect San Diego County to receive more rain and wind this week. The County Sheriff’s Department and CAL FIRE officials are offering driving tips to make travel safer this week.

County emergency services and public works road crews say people should stay alert and take precautions on the roads and offered the following tips.

Careful on the Roads

Avoid driving in heavy rain conditions but if the trip is necessary:

  1. Slow down to avoid getting into an accident. It takes longer to stop when roads are wet. Allow yourself at least an extra 15 minutes or so to arrive at your destination to adjust for slower traffic.
  2. Turn on your headlights to see better and make it easier for other drivers to see you. It’s the law.
  3. Try to drive toward the middle lanes as water tends to gather in outside lanes.
  4. Defog your windows for better visibility. Rain can cause windows to fog up. Along the same lines, check your windshield wipers preferably before it rains again and replace them as needed.
  5. Avoid driving through deep water because it can affect your brakes. If you cannot avoid it, test your brakes afterward to make sure they’ve dried out and are working properly.
  6. Turn around, don’t drown. In heavy rains, never drive through a flooded roadway if you cannot see the pavement. Even a few inches of water running at the right velocity can sweep a car, and even a truck, and its occupants off the roadway and downstream. You should not walk or swim across a flooded roadway either.
  7. Give the cars in front of you extra distance. The spray from their vehicles — particularly from larger trucks and buses — can hamper your vision. And giving extra space to the guy in front of you also gives you more time to brake or adjust if you need to do so.
  8. Keep calm, don’t oversteer or stomp on the brakes if you start to hydroplane or skid when your tires lose traction with the wet road. The Department of Motor Vehicles says keep the steering wheel straight and take your foot off the accelerator so your vehicle can slow down slowly.
  9. Stay focused. Remember, it’s illegal, and dangerous, to try to text or use a hand-held cell phone when you’re driving.
  10. Slow down for the cone zone if you see highway or road workers ahead or to your side. Watch out for public works crews and equipment.
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Southern California

Triple A: Gas prices reverse course, head upward rapidly

The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $4.56, which is seven cents higher than a week ago

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Triple A Auto Club/Los Angeles Blade

LOS ANGELES – After declining for a few weeks, Southern California gas prices headed upward rapidly in the last several days as the region begins the process of switching to the more expensive ‘summer blend’ gasoline, according to the Auto Club’s Weekend Gas Watch.

The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $4.56, which is seven cents higher than a week ago. The average national price is $3.15, which is five cents higher than a week ago.

The average price of self-serve regular gasoline in the Los Angeles-Long Beach area is $4.66 per gallon, which is 12 cents higher than last week, 10 cents lower than last month, and 10 cents higher than last year. In San Diego, the average price is $4.67, which is 11 cents more than last week, 11 cents lower than last month, and eight cents more than this time last year.

On the Central Coast, the average price is $4.65, which is 11 cents higher than last week, nine cents lower than last month, and 14 cents more than last year. In Riverside, the average per-gallon price is $4.49, which is 13 cents higher than last week, 11 cents lower than last month and six cents higher than a year ago. In Bakersfield, the $4.58 average price is one cent higher than last week, 22 cents lower than last month, and three cents higher than a year ago today.

“The Kinder Morgan gasoline pipeline servicing Southern California on Wednesday began shipping the more expensive ‘summer blend’ of gasoline, which is required to be sold in most local areas as of April 1,” said Auto Club Spokesperson Doug Shupe. “The switch generally increases costs at the pump, and additional increases typically occur in February through May if there are supply shortages caused by planned or unplanned local refinery outages as they undergo annual maintenance.”

The Weekend Gas Watch monitors the average price of gasoline. As of 9 a.m. on Feb. 1, averages are:

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