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Lindsey Horvath is the youngest Chair of the Board of Supervisors

Horvath since her election as a Supervisor she has made it clear that she is on a mission to end homelessness in Los Angeles County

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Lindsey P. Horvath became the youngest-ever Chair of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors as she took the gavel Tuesday, Dec. 5. (Photo provided by the Office of Los Angeles County Supervisor Lindsey Horvath)

LOS ANGELES – One year after being sworn in to serve as Supervisor for Los Angeles County’s Third District, Supervisor Lindsey P. Horvath became the youngest-ever Chair of the Board of Supervisors as she took the gavel Tuesday.

During the Board’s reorganization meeting, Supervisor Kathryn Barger was selected as Board Chair Pro Tempore. 

In her remarks following her becoming Board Chair, Horvath noted:

“In listening to young people, I am clear that the crisis of the moment is homelessness. From the threat of falling into homelessness because of the rising costs of rent and just living, to the reality of being unhoused while trying to go to school, and never being able to recover from the debt that piles up, the pervasiveness of homelessness in our region is a daily attack on our dream for a better future.”

“While homelessness is the crisis of the moment, climate change remains the crisis of our time. No one makes that clearer than our young people, whose commitment to a cleaner, more sustainable future is unwavering.”

“But, the most insidious, sinister crisis we face today is the crisis of despair. The rate of suicide is unprecedented, especially among women and girls who face increasingly complicated mental health challenges. Anxiety, depression, and substance use are pervasive.”

 “This is a moment for urgency. This is a moment for impatience. This is a moment for profound change. We must march forward together and take bold steps to bridge generations and create the change that we so urgently need,” she added.

Horvath since her election as a Supervisor she has made it clear that she is on a mission to end homelessness in Los Angeles County. As Third District Supervisor she represents 10 cities and 26 unincorporated communities from West Hollywood to Malibu, Topanga to Chatsworth, and Pacoima to Santa Monica. Her district spans 446.08 square miles and is plagued by homelessness.

There are approximately 69,144 homeless people within the county, and that number is on the rise. 75% of those unhoused individuals do not have any form of permanent housing and are forced to wander from place to place, finding or making shelter wherever they can.

Six out of ten of these unhoused individuals are newly homeless – a reflection of the inequity between rising home prices and stagnant income levels that have left so many in California unable to make ends meet. 

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This past January, [2023] the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors declared a state of emergency for the homeless crisis. 

“The declaration has allowed us to do two things,” Horvath told The Blade. “First, we were able to accelerate hiring. We learned that in the Department of Mental Health, for example, it can take longer than a year for mental health professionals to be hired into the department. That is completely unacceptable. We need to hire people faster to do this work. 

“Second, we were also able to expedite contracting. We learned from LAHSA that a contract could be touched up to 140 times before it is finally executed, and funding is able to reach service providers. Obviously, that is unacceptable. We are improving our contracting processes.”

Given the new laws attempting to outlaw the existence of the LGBTQ+ community in many Republican-controlled red states across America, young LGBTQ+ people flock to places like Los Angeles with little to no resources to avoid being persecuted for their identities. 

When asked how the she intends to deal with the influx of homeless LGBTQ youth pouring into LGBTQ+ safe havens like Los Angeles, Horvath told the Blade that she is prepared to welcome them with open arms. 

“We tackled this challenge a lot when I was the Mayor of West Hollywood. We saw a lot of people come to West Hollywood for exactly this reason, and we know that that is not unique to West Hollywood. It’s happening throughout Los Angeles County, so we are already providing those services to those who need them. Anyone who comes to our area will be met with support and care.”

In a statement released by her office, Horvath detailed her accomplishments over the past year:

  • Introduced the emergency declaration on homelessness, the foundation for expedited results across the County, and appointed herself to LAHSA where she now sits as Chair.  
  • Introduced protections for renters as essential homelessness prevention, including extending a 4% cap on rent increases for unincorporated Los Angeles County, along with other actions to strengthen the Rent Stabilization and Tenant Protections Ordinance.  
  • Championed environmental action through motions to create a cleaner Santa Monica Bay and to protect our coast from sea level rise and erosion; opened improvements to the Marvin Braude Bike Trail; and today introduced implementation steps for the first comprehensive water plan for the region. 
  • Stood for working Angelenos by authoring motions to strengthen hotel worker protections and created an entertainment business interruption fund. She also supported the WGA and SAG/AFTRA strikes. 
  • Advanced a more inclusive and just LA County by initiating a Jewish Community Safety Plan; rooted out hate and antisemitism in all its forms; and recognized LA County’s unofficial “gay beach”. 
  • Focused on care for system impacted young people and families by authoring a motion regarding Mandated Supporters, and co-authored a motion to create a Prevention framework for LA County.

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Los Angeles County

LA County sues Grubhub alleging deceptive business practices

Lawsuit seeks to hold Grubhub accountable for business practices that deceive & overcharge consumers, exploit drivers & restaurants

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App food delivery driver picks up an order. (Screenshot/YouTube)

LOS ANGELES – Los Angeles County filed a lawsuit yesterday against food delivery company Grubhub alleging false and deceptive advertising, misrepresentation and unfair business practices that financially harm consumers, delivery drivers and restaurants.

“This lawsuit sends a clear message: Los Angeles County will not tolerate businesses that deceive consumers, take advantage of restaurants, and exploit the drivers who work hard to provide a valued service,” said Los Angeles County Board Chair Lindsey P. Horvath. “Our County Counsel and Department of Consumer and Business Affairs are standing up for consumers and businesses by fighting these unfair practices.”

The lawsuit alleges that Grubhub engages in the following unfair and deceptive business practices and seeks statewide relief to stop these violations:

Harm to Consumers

  • Deceptively advertises that consumers can place delivery orders online “for free” but then charges consumers fees on those orders at check-out.
  • Uses bait-and-switch tactics to lure consumers with a flat, unqualified price for delivery upfront while adding deceptively labeled “service,” “small order” and “driver benefits” fees at checkout. In some cases, the costs of the fees exceed the cost of the food item ordered.
  • Misrepresents restaurant search results on its apps and websites, telling consumers that the search results are based on relevance to the consumer’s query (e.g., “Chinese food near me”), when in fact, the results and rankings are based in part on how much restaurants have paid Grubhub for placement.

Harm to Drivers

Grubhub misrepresents the qualities, characteristics and scope of the “Driver Benefits Fee,” which Grubhub charges consumers in connection with Proposition 22. Grubhub deceptively implies that the fee provides healthcare benefits to drivers and that consumers no longer need to tip their drivers because “they don’t have to depend on tips.”

Harm to Restaurants

Grubhub deceptively and unilaterally charges restaurants for customer refunds, which Grubhub issues without restaurants’ consent, and without verifying whether the customer or the restaurant was responsible.

“The deceptive and excessive fees charged by Grubhub at checkout blatantly undermine our goal of promoting a fair marketplace where businesses, employees and consumers can thrive,” said Rafael Carbajal, Director of the LA County Department of Consumer and Business Affairs. “These practices inflict financial harm on LA County’s residents, restaurants and workers and are unacceptable while so many of them struggle to make ends meet.”

Consumers, drivers and restaurants who believe they have been harmed by Grubhub’s actions are invited to share their experiences with DCBA by emailing: [email protected], filing online at https://iddweb.isd.lacounty.gov/dca_ecomplaint/ or calling 800-593-8222.

The lawsuit, filed by Los Angeles County Counsel Dawyn R. Harrison on behalf of the people of the State of California in response to complaints from consumers and restaurant owners, seeks injunctive relief to stop the unfair and deceptive business practices, and civil penalties. County Counsel’s Affirmative Litigation and Consumer Protection Division has retained the law firm of Cohen Milstein Sellers & Toll PLLC to assist on this case.

“Our lawsuit seeks to hold Grubhub accountable for their unfair and deceptive business practices that deceive and overcharge consumers, exploit drivers, and unfairly short-change restaurants on order refunds,” Harrison said. “My office is committed to protecting County workers and residents and holding businesses accountable for violations of consumer and worker protection laws.”

The lawsuit was filed in Los Angeles Superior Court, and a copy of the complaint is available here: LA County Grubhub Complaint-Redacted.pdf.

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New on the LA County Channel

You can watch on Channel 92 or 94 on most cable systems, or anytime here. Catch up on LA County Close-Up here

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Photo Credit: County of Los Angeles

New on the County Channel

Lights, camera, nostalgia! The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in the heart of Los Angeles’ Miracle Mile is the perfect destination for movie buffs with special exhibitions and a permanent collection taking viewers behind the scenes into how cinema magic is made.

You can watch more stories like this on Channel 92 or 94 on most cable systems, or anytime here. Catch up on LA County Close-Up here.

In Case You Missed It

Calling All Property Owners and Managers

If you have a vacant residential building or apartment units available, there is a fast and simple way to find qualified renters. LeaseUp is the go-to service for people leasing properties across LA County. LeaseUp is an initiative from the PATH non-profit organization that partners with service providers and property owners, developers, and managers in order to quickly fill vacancies and help those at risk of homelessness find and maintain housing.

At Your Service

Grants Available for First-time Homebuyers

The Department of Consumer and Business Affairs and LA County Center for Financial Empowerment has launched the County of Los Angeles Greenline Home Program which aims to tackle the legacy of redlining. The goal is to empower and uplift economically marginalized communities. $35,000 grants will be available for first-time homebuyers living in LA County.

To learn more about eligibility requirements visit dcba.lacounty.gov/greenline.

Out and About

Rise, Reclaim, Restore

Teens are invited to join the LA County Department of Public Health at the Rise, Reclaim, Restore Youth Mental Health Summit. Through engaging workshops and interactive activities, these summits will equip young people with the tools to navigate their mental well-being, support their friends, and become leaders in their schools. Together, we will explore strategies for self-care, coping mechanisms, and building resilience.

Youth who attend will be eligible for raffle prizes, freebies, and community service hours! Click here to learn more.

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A look inside LA County’s new ballot processing center ahead of the March 5 Primary election. Make your plan to vote today!
(Photo: Los Angeles County / Mayra Beltran Vasquez)

Click here to access more photos of LA County in action.

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Los Angeles County

New on the LA County Channel

You can watch on Channel 92 or 94 on most cable systems, or anytime here. Catch up on LA County Close-Up here

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Photo Credit: County of Los Angeles

New on the County Channel

LA County’s state of emergency on homelessness is one year old. This seismic shift has accelerated service delivery, cut red tape, and sparked critical change for LA County and our communities. Watch this video to learn more about how LA County is charting a new course to end homelessness.

To learn more about LA County’s response to the homeless emergency, visit homeless.lacounty.gov/emergency/year-one/.

You can watch more stories like this on Channel 92 or 94 on most cable systems, or anytime here. Catch up on LA County Close-Up here.

In Case You Missed It

Make Your Plan to Vote By Mail – Register by February 20!

The March 5th Presidential Primary Election is quickly approaching, and we want to make sure you’re ready to make your voice heard. This year, the Los Angeles County Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk has made it easier than ever to be a voter.

Skip the lines and make your plan to Vote by Mail today.

It’s fast, easy, and convenient to Vote by Mail:

  1. Register to vote by February 20th to receive your Vote by Mail ballot. Have you moved? Are you new to L.A. County? Will this be your first time voting? Update your voter registration here.
  2. Drop your ballot off in the mail or at an Official Ballot Drop Box. Look out for your ballot in the mail. When you receive it, fill it in, sign it, and drop it off at a mailbox on your way to work, on your daily walk, or when dropping the kids off at school. You can also drop it off at any Ballot Drop Box near you.
  3. Securely track your ballot with the Where’s My Ballot? tool. Hesitating to Vote by Mail because you want to make sure your vote is counted? The Where’s My Ballot? tool will maintain your privacy and track your ballot every step of the way. Track your ballot here.

When you Vote by Mail, you ensure that work, school, long lines, or a bad commute on Election Day won’t stop your ballot from being counted. Make your plan to vote today!

February is Spay/Neuter Awareness Month

February is Spay/Neuter Awareness Month, and the County of Los Angeles Department of Animal Care and Control has opportunities for pet owners to spay and neuter their pets at a reduced cost.

To see if you qualify for a reduced-cost voucher, send an email to: [email protected] or call (562) 345-0321.

Remember, spaying and neutering your pets are required by law in LA County.
To learn more about the Department of Animal Care and Control visit: animalcare.lacounty.gov.

At Your Service

Misfortune & Calamity Tax Relief

If your home was damaged by the recent flooding and mudslides, you may be eligible for tax relief. To qualify, you must file an application with the Assessor’s Office within 12 months from the date the property was damaged or destroyed, and the loss must exceed $10,000 of the current market value.

To learn more, visit assessor.lacounty.gov/tax-relief/disaster-relief.

Out and About

Celebrate Black History Month

Celebrate Black History Month with Los Angeles County at one of many events happening throughout the County. We also encourage you to join us in a month-long tribute to the trailblazers who have influenced our community and the world. 

For more information, or to find an event near you, click here.

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LA County’s Military and Veteran Affairs’ Gallery of Heroes – African American Military History. (Photo: Los Angeles County / Mayra Beltran Vasquez)


Click here to access more photos of LA County in action.

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Los Angeles County

Erosion and storm damage to close PCH in Malibu nightly

Full closure of PCH in Malibu nightly 6PM-7AM or later until further notice due to erosion. Check traffic app/website before driving

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This photo released on Feb. 14, 2024 shows the damage to the Pacific Coast Highway after the recent storms. (Photo Credit: Caltrans)

LOS ANGELES – Officials from Caltrans District 7 in Los Angeles and the City of Malibu announced that the Pacific Coast Highway, (PCH) California Highway 1 from Sycamore Canyon Road in the City of Malibu to Las Posas Road in Ventura County will be closed to traffic  “until further notice” from 6 p.m. to at least 7 a.m. daily “until further notice.”

According to CalTrans, significant erosion and storm damage from the back to back atmospheric river events coupled with heavy rainfall and high tide wave action damaged sections of PCH’s ocean side shoulder.

A spokesperson for the agency acknowledged that more expected storms is likely to further impact the damaged sections of the roadway.

“Caltrans plans to install k-rails to block off the righthand ocean side lane and begin emergency steps to stabilize the collapsed slope,” the agencs said. “A Caltrans inspector must assess the damage each morning and determine when it’s safe to reopen.”

Once PCH does reopen each morning, it will likely be limited to two lanes in both directions, as “crews will shift lanes to the land side.”

The City of Malibu released a statement noting:

Full closure of PCH nightly 6PM-7AM or later, Sycamore Cyn – Las Posas until further notice due to erosion. Check traffic app/website before driving

All lanes of PCH in both directions will be closed nightly 6:00 PM to 700 AM (or later) from Sycamore Canyon Rd to Las Posas Road in Ventura County until further notice due to erosion of ocean side shoulder from high tides and storm damage, and more expected storms. Reopening times may vary based on high tides or storm conditions. Motorists should use alternate routes.

Caltrans plans to install k-rails to block off the righthand ocean side lane and begin emergency steps to stabilize the collapsed slope. A Caltrans inspector must assess the damage each morning and determine when it’s safe to reopen. Crews will shift lanes to the land side to provide two lanes in both directions. Watch for reduced speed limit signs, and workers and work vehicles in the road. Under California law, traffic violation fines are doubled in construction zones.

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Chair of LA County Supervisors announces storm recovery efforts

Disaster assistance programs are not guaranteed, so residents and businesses are encouraged to continue working with their insurance carriers

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Lindsey P. Horvath, Chair of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors. (Photo Credit: County of Los Angeles)

LOS ANGELES – As Los Angeles County begins to support residents with their individual recovery efforts following the recent storms, Lindsey P. Horvath, Chair of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, wants to help connect impacted community members to recovery resources and activities.

“As we begin the recovery process, Los Angeles County is here to support the renters, homeowners, and businesses impacted by the storm,” said Horvath. “No one is alone in navigating this process, and the County is here to help ensure our communities are connected to the resources they need. We came together to stay safe, and we’ll do the same through our recovery process.”

The first step in the process is for individuals and businesses to complete a survey to answer preliminary questions regarding any damage that was sustained from the recent storms. The Office of Emergency Management (OEM) will work directly with the County’s 88 cities to analyze this information and validate what is reported.

This survey is intended for information gathering purposes and will be used to determine if the County is eligible for various disaster assistance programs based on the total amount of damages reported Countywide.

Disaster assistance programs are not guaranteed, so residents and businesses are encouraged to continue working with their insurance carriers while this information is collected.

The public can access the Damage Collection Survey at https://recovery.lacounty.gov/february-2024-winter-storm/. The County’s Recovery page for the 2024 storms will serve as a resource hub for all post-disaster information.

Residents are encouraged to visit the website regularly for the most up-to-date information regarding recovery activities. For assistance in completing the survey, residents can call 2-1-1.

The LA County Assessor’s Office is also here to help through Misfortune & Calamity Tax Relief. Learn more at https://assessor.lacounty.gov/tax-relief/disaster-relief.

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New on the LA County Channel

You can watch on Channel 92 or 94 on most cable systems, or anytime here. Catch up on LA County Close-Up here

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Photo Credit: County of Los Angeles

New on the County Channel

Fireworks welcomed the start of the Lunar New Year at Portrero Park in Montebello where local residents celebrated traditional food and stories.

You can watch more stories like this on Channel 92 or 94 on most cable systems, or anytime here. Catch up on LA County Close-Up here.

In Case You Missed It

Accessible Estate Planning for LA County Residents

Are you a resident of LA County looking to secure your family’s future? The Leaving a Legacy program makes estate planning a seamless and accessible process. Whether it’s drafting a will or setting up a trust, we understand the importance of creating a lasting legacy and offering protection for your loved ones.

Let us guide you through this important process with ease and confidence. Don’t wait to take this crucial step in safeguarding your legacy. Visit dcba.lacounty.gov/leavingalegacy today for more details and start preparing for a better tomorrow.

At Your Service

Shop Local This Valentine’s Day!

Love is in the air, and we’re thrilled to celebrate Valentine’s Day with you! As part of our ongoing commitment to support local businesses in LA County, the Department of Economic Opportunity is extending their Shop Local Sweepstakes to give you a chance to win up to $500 to your favorite small business!

Here’s how you can participate:

  • Shop Local: Show your love for our community by shopping at any participating local business in LA County. Whether you’re searching for the perfect gift for your special someone or treating yourself, every purchase counts!
  • Spread the Love: Share your experiences on social media using the hashtags #ShopLocalLA and #ValentinesDay. Let’s spread the love and encourage others to support our incredible local businesses.
  • Enter to Win: Visit our website ShopLocal.LA/win to enter our Valentine’s Day sweepstakes. Simply fill out the pledge form for a chance to win!

This Valentine’s Day, we can make a difference by supporting our local businesses!

Out and About

Celebrate Black History Month with Parks and Recreation

Black History Month is an annual observance that focuses attention on the contributions of African Americans to the United States. Celebrated around the world, Black History Month honors the triumphs, contributions, and struggles of Black people from all periods of U.S. history. Through education and acknowledgement, join LA County’s Department of Parks and Recreation in recognizing past and present key figures, and moments during Black History Month at a Los Angeles County Park.

For more information, or to find an event near you, click here.

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Lunar New Year Event at Rosemead Library. (Los Angeles County/Mayra Vasquez)

Visit LACounty.gov to learn more about Lunar New Year events, programming and resources that are available for you to access.

Click here to access more photos of LA County in action.

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Los Angeles County

Medical debt increases in LA County to more than $2.9 billion

Medical debt continues to affect approximately 1 in 10 adults in LA County in 2022, similar to the prevalence of major health conditions

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Los Angeles Blade/Screenshot

LOS ANGELES – The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health has released an update for its report, Medical Debt in LA County: Baseline Report and Action Plan, which found that total medical debt burden now exceeds $2.9 billion with an approximate $300 million increase from 2021 to 2022.

Medical debt continues to affect approximately 1 in 10 adults in LA County in 2022, similar to the prevalence of major health conditions such as asthma and diabetes.

Insurance Expansion Failed to Curb Debt

With expanding insurance coverage and the Public Health Emergency protections for COVID-19, the percentage of uninsured residents dropped by approximately 13% from 2021 to 2022. However, during the same time period, medical debt still increased, indicating that insurance expansion, while important for healthcare access, has not fully addressed the underlying factors contributing to medical debt.

Mirroring trends observed during COVID-19, medical debt has disproportionately impacted vulnerable groups. Latino adults (12.0%), Black adults (11.0%), and American Indian/Alaskan Native, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander and multiracial adults (11.3%) were more burdened than White (8.2%) and Asian (6.5%) adults. Adults in households with incomes below the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) (12.2%), from 100-199% FPL (13.3%), and from 200-299% FPL (13.0%), were more burdened by medical debt than those in households with incomes at 300% or more of the FPL (7.5%). In 2022, 300% of the Federal Poverty Level for a family of 4 was $83,250.

Additionally, Medi-Cal recipients were approximately twice as likely to have medical debt than those on Medicare. More than 25% of uninsured adults experience medical debt and were over eight times more likely to be burdened by medical debt than those with Medicare.

Detrimental Effects on Health and Well-being

Medical debt remains a priority public health issue, as medical debt impeded patients’ ability to access necessary care and treatment, creating a cycle of health and financial hardship. Adults with medical debt were over three times more likely to skip or delay needed healthcare, and approximately three and a half times more likely to delay or not pick up prescriptions compared to those who were not burdened with medical debt. Additionally, adults with medical debt burden were almost two and a half times more likely to experience food insecurity and over 3 times more likely to experience housing instability.

“Financial security is a key social determinant of health and medical debt erodes a person’s ability to take care of their financial and physical health. The Department of Public Health is working with partners across the county to advance solutions to this distressing issue,” said Barbara Ferrer, Ph.D., M.P.H., M.Ed., Director of the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. “Our coalition of community organizations, hospitals and healthcare plans developed a comprehensive plan, and with leadership from the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, we are working together to strengthen protections for health care consumers.”

Strengthening Protections for Health Care Consumers 

On October 3, 2023, the Board of Supervisors passed a motion recognizing the impact medical debt has on County residents that calls for the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, working with coalition members and the Departments of Health Services, Mental Health, Consumer and Business Affairs, Public Social Services, and Economic Opportunity, County Counsel, and the Chief Executive Office (CEO), to take multiple actions to better understand the extent of medical debt challenges and design solutions to reduce financial hardships.

The following actions will be taken in response to the motion: 

  • Public Health will draft an ordinance to gather data on LA County hospital debt collection and financial assistance activities to highlight hospital best practices.
  • Public Health will collaborate with Consumer and Business Affairs to identify policies, practices, and programs to prevent medical debt.
  • Public Health will work with the CEO to assess the feasibility for retiring medical debt with funding sources, whether government or philanthropic, similar to programs in Cook County (IL) and New York City.
  • In consultation with Public Health and partner County agencies, the CEO Office of Legislative Affairs and Intergovernmental Relations will advocate for policy changes that will improve consumer protections and mitigate medical debt.

Data Source

This analysis used data from the 2017-2022 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS), the nation’s largest state-level health survey conducted by the University of California, Los Angeles. Most of the analyses were based on 2019-2022 survey responses from a representative sample of 18,002 adults (18+) in Los Angeles County who were asked if they have had problems paying medical bills for themselves or their household members in the past 12 months. 

To view the update and the original report online, visit http://publichealth.lacounty.gov/hccp/medicalDebt/

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New on the LA County Channel

You can watch on Channel 92 or 94 on most cable systems, or anytime here. Catch up on LA County Close-Up here

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Photo Credit: County of Los Angeles

New on the County Channel

On the latest episode of ‘One on One’ LA County Library Director Skye Patrick explores all the services the library has to offer and touches on the controversies around banned books and Drag Queen Story Hour.

You can watch more stories like this on Channel 92 or 94 on most cable systems, or anytime here. Catch up on LA County Close-Up here.

In Case You Missed It

Claim Your Cash Pilot Program

Every year, LA County families miss out on $500 million in tax credits. But this tax season, the Claim Your Cash LA pilot will make it easier for families to claim the cash they need like the CalEITC and Youth Child Tax Credit. To learn more about this program, schedule a free tax prep appointment, and claim your cash, visit ClaimYourCashLA.com

At Your Service

Make Your Plan to Vote By Mail

The March 5th Presidential Primary Election is quickly approaching and we want to make sure you’re ready to make your voice heard. This year, the Los Angeles County Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk has made it easier than ever to be a voter.

Skip the lines and make your plan to Vote by Mail today.

It’s fast, easy, and convenient to Vote by Mail:

  1. Register to vote by February 20th to receive your Vote by Mail ballot. Have you moved? Are you new to L.A. County? Will this be your first time voting? Update your voter registration here.
  2. Drop your ballot off in the mail or at an Official Ballot Drop Box. Look out for your ballot in the mail. When you receive it, fill it in, sign it, and drop it off at a mailbox on your way to work, on your daily walk, or when dropping the kids off at school. You can also drop it off at any Ballot Drop Box near you.
  3. Securely track your ballot with the Where’s My Ballot? tool. Hesitating to Vote by Mail because you want to make sure your vote is counted? The Where’s My Ballot? tool will maintain your privacy and track your ballot every step of the way. Track your ballot here.

When you Vote by Mail, you ensure that work, school, long lines, or a bad commute on Election Day won’t stop your ballot from being counted. Make your plan to vote today!

Out and About

Celebrating Lunar New Year

LA County is celebrating Lunar New Year with a number of community events and programs! Visit LACounty.gov to find events, programming and resources that are available for you to access.

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The Sixth Street Viaduct. (Los Angeles County / Mayra Vasquez)

Click here to access more photos of LA County in action.

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Los Angeles County

New on the LA County Channel

You can watch on Channel 92 or 94 on most cable systems, or anytime here. Catch up on LA County Close-Up here

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Photo Credit: County of Los Angeles

New on the County Channel

Cruella Brazil brought her performance magic to the West Hollywood Library Drag Story Hour to inspire kids to read and bring some fun for the entire family.

You can watch more stories like this on Channel 92 or 94 on most cable systems, or anytime here. Catch up on LA County Close-Up here.

In Case You Missed It

TODAY – Rental Housing Habitability Program

Join the LA County Department of Public Health and the LA County Department of Consumer and Business Affairs TONIGHT at 6pm for a virtual stakeholder meeting to inform residents about the proposed components of the Rental Housing Habitability Program and receive feedback. The meeting will be presented with simultaneous Spanish translation.

Learn more here

At Your Service

Free Pet Wellness Clinic

The Department of Animal Care and Control will be hosting a Vet@thePark Free Wellness Clinic on Sunday, January 28, 2024, from 9am-1pm.

The event will take place at Artesia Park located at 18750 Clarkdale Avenue, Artesia, CA 90701. Walk-ins are allowed as time permits on a first-come, first-served basis.

Out and About

Smarty Pants Storytime Events

Let’s get ready for school! Enjoy books, songs, rhymes, and movement while learning school readiness skills and having fun. For ages 2 – 5 with their parent or caregiver.

For more information, or to find a storytime near you, click here.

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Los Angeles County / Mayra Vasquez

Live Animal Program at the Natural History Museum.

Click here to access more photos of LA County in action.

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Casa Del Zuma, addressing the housing crisis for Trans Angelenos

The housing crisis in LA has disproportionately affected vulnerable communities, & trans women often face complex barriers to housing

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Christina Munguia, a trans Clinical Social Worker, is working tirelessly to support trans women facing homelessness in Los Angeles County. (Photo Credit: Christina Munguia)

LOS ANGELES – To address the housing crisis in the city, Christina Munguia, a transgender Clinical Social Worker, is working tirelessly to support transgender women facing homelessness. Munguia is the first transgender individual accepted into the USC Suzanne Dworack-Peck School of Social Work.

Munguia’s focus is on a unique housing initiative named “Casa de Zulma,” nestled in an undisclosed location in downtown Los Angeles. This innovative project is the first-ever publicly funded Enhanced Bridge Housing for transgender women in Los Angeles County, brought to fruition by Special Service for Groups, Inc. (SSG) through its divisions APAIT and HOPICS.

APAIT, established in 1987, is a prominent AIDS service organization dedicated to advocating, educating, and promoting optimal health for vulnerable communities, particularly Asian and Pacific Islanders. Originating as a grassroots initiative, APAIT has evolved into a comprehensive provider of behavioral health services, housing support, and HIV/AIDS assistance across Los Angeles and Orange counties. Grounded in core values of compassion, commitment, and integrity, APAIT’s mission is to positively impact the quality of life for those facing behavioral health challenges, housing insecurity, and the risk of HIV/AIDS.

The Homeless Outreach Program Integrated Care System (HOPICS) is a Division of Special Service for Groups. HOPICS, a multi-service agency, has been serving vulnerable men, women, and children since 1988 in Service Planning Area 6 (SPA 6), which includes South Los Angeles, Compton, Lynwood, and Paramount. Recognized as one of the largest housing and homeless service agencies in Los Angeles County, HOPICS employs a client-centered “whatever it takes” approach to provide innovative social services, emphasizing behavioral health and housing stability.

The housing crisis in Los Angeles has disproportionately affected vulnerable communities, and transgender women often face complex barriers to housing due to societal transphobia and intersecting challenges such as sexism, racism.

Munguia told the Blade that does not specifically cater to transgender residents poses serious threats to transgender women seeking shelter.

“These women are often placed in the men’s section,” Munguia said, explaining that this placement puts them at greater risk of sexual assault and battery. “Then, sometimes when they are placed with the women, the cisgender women do not approve of having them in their section. So they find themselves in a limbo.”  

Casa de Zulma aims to address these issues by providing a safe and affirming space for transgender women.

Jazzmun Crayton, Health & Policy Coordinator at APAIT/SSG, emphasizes the impact of poverty on the transgender community, leading to increased vulnerability to violence, homelessness, substance abuse, and mental illness. The agency secured funding from the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA) to tackle the evolving needs of the communities they serve.

Veronica Lewis, Director of HOPICS/SSG, emphasizes the importance of creating intentional efforts from the public sector to provide safe spaces for vulnerable populations. Casa de Zulma not only offers space for up to 20 transgender women but also provides trauma-informed care, including behavioral health services and intensive case management with the goal of linkage to permanent supportive housing.

The project is named after Zulma Velasquez, a former APAIT staff member and consumer who dedicated her life to building community and providing a safe space for queer and trans individuals. Speakers at the unveiling event in 2019 included Los Angeles City Mayor Eric Garcetti, City Council President Herb Wesson, and City Council Member Mitch O’Farrell, showcasing the community-wide support for this critical initiative.

Christina Munguia’s recalled a particularly meaningful project wherein she helped rehabilitate a group of 5 transgender refugees who escaped persecution in their countries due to their sexual identities. Munguia and APAIT were able to provide these refugees with housing, documentation, and comprehensive medical and mental health support – an example of the success Munguia aims for with all of her clients. 

Casa de Zulma stands as a testament to the commitment of individuals like Christina Munguia and organizations like APAIT/SSG and HOPICS to advocate, educate, and achieve optimal health and well-being for vulnerable communities in Los Angeles. As the city grapples with a housing crisis, Casa de Zulma emerges as a beacon of hope, offering not just shelter but a supportive environment that empowers and uplifts transgender women in their journey towards stability and well-being.

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