April 18, 2017 at 10:04 am PDT | by Troy Masters
Calif. porn productions on hold after HIV scare: report
porn stop work order, gay news, Washington Blade

The pornography industry’s leading trade association has issued a ‘precautionary production hold after a possible positive test for HIV by an adult performer.’

Fears that an adult film star has tested positive for HIV have resulted in a kind of ‘stop work’ order, according to the industry’s leading trade association, the Free Speech Coalition (FSC).

In a statement on its website, FSC says it issued  ‘a precautionary production hold after a possible positive test for HIV by an adult performer listed in the PASS (Performer Availability Screening Services) database’.

The identity of the actor remains confidential.

FSC wrote that the actor “had not performed on any fluid exchange sets since their last negative test, or performed on any adult set during the possible window of transmission.”

“If it is a false positive, the hold will be lifted on Wednesday (April 19),” the statement continues. However, FSC is currently notifying all of the porn star’s past partners and will require new testing for anyone who may have been exposed.

The porn industry, which helped defeat a ballot initiative in 2016 that would have required actors to wear condoms, claims it has worked to improve health and safety conditions.

California’s Proposition 60 was, in part, a response to several HIV-related health scares among actors over the past decade. In addition to requiring performers to use condoms in adult films, Proposition 60 would have made producers liable for violations and would have empowered any state resident to enforce the rule. It would have also required state-issued health certificates for production companies and strict STD testing protocols. A similar measure was passed by Los Angeles voters in 2012.

FSC claims no HIV transmissions have occurred in the past 10 years on shoots that are monitored.

In 2016, a gay adult film actor in California is said to have unwittingly infected two of his 17 unprotected partners with HIV despite having tested negative only days before, according to a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). How it was determined the actor in question infected the two is not clear.

The CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report warned at the time ‘that testing alone is not sufficient to prevent HIV transmission.’

In 2004, after two actors tested positive for HIV most major production companies agreed to shut down for 60 days in an effort to prevent the virus from spreading. The industry imposed a biweekly STD protocol in 2013.

Eric Paul Leue, the Free Speech Coalition’s executive director, said the biweekly HIV tests have been successful. Their FSC Performer Availability Scheduling Service (PASS) “provides guidelines and services for the adult production industry designed to ensure a safe and healthy work environment of performers and adult film professionals,” according to the group’s website.

FSC encourages, but does not require, the daily use of PrEP, the antiviral drug that has been shown to be 98 percent effective in preventing HIV infection.

The Adult Performer Advocacy Committee (APAC), an advocacy guild for porn actors, says it supports the temporary hiatus.

“Based on the current genealogy, there is low-risk to the performer pool,” the APAC said in a statement. APAC and FSC will release statements within days regarding whether the production freeze will be lifted.

The industry has been estimated to be worth $6 billion in California and $11 billion nationwide and provides thousands of production related jobs nationwide.

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