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Gear up for fall arts at LA’s vanguard venues

A busy season of exhibits, gardens and more

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fall arts, gay news, Washington Blade

Installation view of “Sadie Barnette: The New Eagle Creek Saloon.” (Photo by Robert Divers Herrick)

As the seasons change, Los Angeles cultural institutions remain steadfast in their commitment to challenge, inspire, and stimulate. Anticipating what fall has to offer, the Blade recently spoke with reps from some of the area’s most iconic destinations about current and upcoming offerings that speak to the heart of our community, and the soul of their mission.

The Marciano Art Foundation | This contemporary art space in the heart of Los Angeles contains a collection representing well-established, mid-career, and emerging artists, predominantly from the 1990s to present. The Foundation, they note, was “built by a family whose passion and dedication to the arts initiates special projects by artists working in all areas of artistic production, in order to encourage curiosity and contemplation of art and the ways it impacts and enriches our lives.”

Senior Creative Director Olivia Marciano says the MAF offers “a welcoming, inclusive environment for all. As part of our ongoing mission, we work to embody this fully.” Throughout the fall, they’re hosting Donna Huanca’s solo exhibition, “Obsidian Ladder,” which Marciano describes as “a femme intervention in a formerly male-dominated space of the Scottish Rite Masonic Temple.” Painted femme models will inhabit the environment every Saturday, asserting, says Marciano, “their freedom against the power structures and hierarchies in our society.”

Of further interest to LGBTQs, Sept. 28 sees a work produced alongside REACH LA. “The Awt (say it out loud) of Measuring Resilience” is an afternoon of visual and performance demonstrations representing REACH LA’s 25-year history of serving queer youth of color, as well as its current activities in the house and ballroom community (as facilitated by Sean/Milan Garcon).

The Marciano Art Foundation is located at 4357 Wilshire Boulevard. Call 424-204-7555 or visit marcianoartfoundation.org.

The Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Botanical Gardens | This treasured triple threat offers gardens, galleries, and hundreds of rare materials in the Library Exhibition Hall, along with programming that includes public lectures and botanical workshops. On view as of Sept. 21, “Nineteen Nineteen” celebrates The Huntington’s centennial, via 275 objects from their vast collection. (Vast is an understatement—the institution has some 11 million items.)

Interim Chief Curator of American Art James Glisson, who created the exhibition with Curator of Photography and Visual Culture Jennifer A. Watts, recalls that rather than an overview of their last 100 years, “We decided we would just tell the story of the year of our founding.”

Everything on display was copyrighted, edited, or exhibited in 1919. In doing that, Glisson says, “We found a variety of materials that will surprise people familiar with The Huntington,” including a 39-foot-long map of the LA street car line.

“What this shows,” says Glisson, “is that 1919 was a tumultuous year” in which The Huntington was founded against the backdrop of extraordinary global changes. “Keep in mind, back in Europe, the Treaty of Versailles was negotiated, and an entire new world order was being formed. Locally here in LA, there was a streetcar strike in August. Nationally, the summer of 1919 is called the ‘Red Summer,’ because of the extraordinary violence against returning African-American soldiers.”

Glisson says LGBTQ visitors will find their community represented by materials on modern dance pioneer Ruth St. Denis, books hand-printed by Virginia Woolf, and suffragist material about women, and the passage of the 19th Amendment that year.

The Huntington is located at 1151 Oxford Road, San Marino. General admission includes all exhibitions, galleries, and gardens. Call 626-405-2140 or visit Huntington.org.

The Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles | Founded in 1984 as the Santa Monica Museum of Art and reestablished in 2017 with a new identity, ICA LA prides itself in being “an epicenter of artistic experimentation and incubator of new ideas.”

Opening Sept. 29, “No Wrong Holes: Thirty Years of Nayland Blake” is the largest survey show of the artist, says ICA LA Deputy Director Samuel Vasquez. It also marks their first solo institutional presentation in Los Angeles.

“Not only is Nayland an artist,” says Vasquez, “but also an educator and a mentor—a very important figure in the art community, given the wide range of work.” Blake is, notes Vasquez, “a queer-identified, non-binary individual, and a lot of the work deals with issues of representation [Blake is biracial; African American and white].” Identity is a theme that comes up, says Vasquez, “because Nayland is what would be considered ‘passing,’ because they have a ‘white’ appearance. But the general theme is this notion of ‘play.’ There are a lot of objects such as bunnies, references to S&M culture, and the punk culture.”

Particular focus, press materials note, “will be paid to work produced while Blake lived on the West Coast, first in the greater Los Angeles area as a graduate student at CalArts, followed by a decade in San Francisco—years bookended by the advancement of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the 1980s and the ‘culture wars’ of the 1990s.”

Also at ICA LA, through Jan. 26, 2020, is “Sadie Barnette: The New Eagle Creek Saloon.” Barnette, a Bay Area-based artist, has crafted, says Vasquez, “this incredibly colorful, vibrant installation that is a homage to her father’s bar, which was the first black-owned gay bar in San Francisco.” (Rodney Barnette was founder of the Compton, CA chapter of the Black Panther Party. His bar was in operation from 1990-1993.)

The installation’s title, notes Vasquez, “is the name of the bar, and it’s an actual bar that is activated through performances, programming, and talks, as an homage to what her father created—a safe space for the community.”

Vasquez says these two offerings speak to what has been “in our DNA since we were the Santa Monica Museum of Art. And going beyond the LGBT community, we’re a space for all communities, regardless of class, social position, or identity.” ICA LA, he adds, creates that safe space by “hiring staff not only from diverse backgrounds, but from a wide range of representation. When you come in, you are greeted by, maybe, someone who is non-binary or identifies as queer.”

ICA LA is located at 1717 E. 7th St. Admission is free. Call 213-928-0833 or visit theicala.org.

The Hammer Museum | The Hammer believes in, they note, “the promise of art and ideas to illuminate our lives and build a more just world.” They’re currently expanding on their commitment to that notion—literally. A multiyear construction project is taking place, which will see 40,000 square feet of newly acquired space, along with the renovation of their current facility. Throughout, the Hammer remains open to the public.

Case in point: Opening Sept. 29 is the comprehensive retrospective “Lari Pittman: Declaration of Independence.” As both painter and social critic, Pittman has been, Museum press material notes, “a strong presence in both the international sphere and the LA art community.” This retrospective takes visitors from the early days of collage and decoration, to iconic 1990s paintings that reference the AIDS crisis and culture wars of the 1990s, to more recent works.

“In addition to being an extraordinary painter, Lari has been an important figure in the Los Angeles art community for the past four decades as both artist and teacher. He has influenced generations of artists as a professor in UCLA’s art department, and is part of a generation of artists who emerged internationally in the 1990s,” says Hammer Director Ann Philbin. “His paintings confront history, politics, violence, and sexuality in a highly aestheticized manner that is both exquisitely painted and deeply responsive to the issues of our time.”

The Hammer Museum is at the corner of Westwood and Wilshire boulevards in Westwood Village, three blocks east of the 405 Freeway’s Wilshire exit. Admission is free. Call 310-443-7000 or visit hammer.ucla.edu.

ALSO OF NOTE

Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust | This “primary source institution” commemorates those who perished, honors those who survived, and houses the precious artifacts that miraculously weathered the Holocaust. Free Holocaust education to students and visitors are among its offerings, as part of a mission to “build a more respectful, dignified, and humane world.” Through Oct. 22, “Women at the Frontline of Mass Violence Worldwide” is a traveling exhibit that gives voice to female survivors of mass violence and genocide, via portraits and excerpts of testimony from, among others, Roma female survivors of the Porajmos (the genocide against the Roma during World War II) and indigenous women from Guatemala, victims of the internal armed conflict in the 1980s. The exhibit is presented in English and Spanish. Located at 100 S. The Grove Dr. Call 323-651-3704 or visit lamoth.org.

Los Angeles County Museum of Art | With LACMA construction taking place, original collection galleries are closed, BCAM and Resnick Pavilion feature art from the collection in ongoing exhibitions. A new building for the permanent collection—the David Geffen Galleries—opens in 2024. Upcoming offerings include the Sept. 22 debut of “Thomas Joshua Cooper: The World’s Edge,” featuring 65 large-scale and 75 8 x 10 black and white photographs showcasing Cooper’s “The Atlas of Emptiness and Extremity, The World’s Edge, the Atlantic Basin Project,” a charting of chart the Atlantic Basin from the extreme points of each north, south, east, and west coordinate. “For him,” the LACMA website notes, “each place is a point of departure allowing contemplation of the ocean’s emptiness beyond the extreme points of the land.” Located at 5905 Wilshire Blvd. Call 323-857-6000 or visit lacma.org.

The Broad | A major survey by groundbreaking artist Shirin Neshat opens on Oct. 19. “I Will Greet the Sun Again” spans roughly three decades of creative output, which, they note, “engages with Iranian history, the experience of living in exile, and the human impact of political revolution.” “Greet” also includes the global debut of “Land of Dreams,” a feature-length film addressing social injustice and major cultural changes in America. Located at 221 S. Grand Avenue, Los Angeles. More info at thebroad.org.

The J. Paul Getty Museum | The Museum collects, presents, conserves, and interprets great works of art. Its collection of more than 120,000 separate objects inspires curiosity about—and enjoyment and understanding of—the visual arts, among audiences of all ages.

On view through Nov. 10, says Head of Public Affairs John Giurini, “is our major exhibition, “Gordon Parks: The Flávio Story.” Parks (1912-2006) was, notes Giurini, “an African American photographer who was very active in the 1960s, and this particular series, he did on assignment from Life magazine, to do a photo essay on poverty in Brazil.” A young boy by the name of Flávio da Silva became a subject of focus, with Parks returning to Brazil multiple times, to document Flávio’s life. “It shows,” says Giurini, “how a photographer interacts with a subject, and they develop a relationship, a bond.” The exhibition is accompanied by another called “Once. Again. Photographs in Series,” which, Giurini notes, “looks at how photographers, over the years, revisit the same subject” to observe change.

Giurini says photography allows the Getty to address present day concerns, via a medium still in its infancy when compared to the majority of their collection, which is “very defined by Western European works prior to 1900,” in which LGBTQ subject matter is rarely overtly addressed.

An exhibition premiering on Dec. 17 promises diversity in content and theme, as “Unseen: 35 Years of Collecting Photographs” looks at photography accumulated (and still being acquired) by the Getty. “Within that,” says Giurini, “there will be artists who are LGBT. It will show the way we’ve worked hard to develop a very diverse body of artists and work… Photography, particularly because it brings us into the present day, allows us the freedom to expand and grow—and our curators do ask the question, ‘How do we present it [the rest of the collection] in a way that allows us to explore different topics and subject matters?’ ”

The J. Paul Getty Museum is located at 1200 Getty Center Drive, Los Angeles. Admission is free. Call 310-440-7300 or visit getty.edu.

Lari Pittman, “Untitled #8 (The Dining Room),” 2005. Cel-Vinyl, acrylic, and alkyd on gessoed canvas over wood. 86 × 102 in. (218.4 × 259.1 cm). From “Lari Pittman: Declaration of Independence,” opening Oct. 29 at the Hammer Museum. (Collection of Christen Sveaas. © Lari Pittman, courtesy of Regen Projects, Los Angeles)

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Jinkx and DeLa deliver pitch-perfect holiday comedy

The Return of The Jinkx & DeLa Holiday Show, LIVE!” comes to LA for one show only: Saturday, December 18, at The Theatre at Ace Hotel

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Jinkx Monsoon & BenDeLaCreme (Photo by Jiji Lee)

NEW YORK – Touring through December 30 with a new, essential viewing installment of their annual holiday stage show (skipped last year because of COVID-Number-You-Know), drag queens Jinkx Monsoon and BenDeLaCreme need about five minutes of stage time to prove they’ve earned their place in the pantheon of mismatched comedy duos.

From the time they set up the show’s premise to the moment they send their swooning audience back into the larger world hoarse from excess laughter, the writer/performers work a binge-worthy buddy dynamic informed by the kinetic stage antics of Martin and Lewis, the pitch-perfect timing of Bob and Ray, the contempt-breeding familiarity of Eunice and Mama, and the fourth wall-breaking rivalry of Looney Tunes characters. (“Duck Season,” insists DeLa’s Bugs, answered by a “Rabbit Season!”-spouting Jinkx, in full-on Daffy mode.)

If some of the above pairings don’t ping your radar, no worry. Rest assured the carefully calibrated Christmas concoction created by DeLa and Jinkx knows its herstory. You can see it clear as day, in the DNA of each character: DeLa is stick-up-posterior organized and proper—the rigid product of too many traditional Christmases in Connecticut. Jinkx is a vulgar vixen whose idea of decking the halls is hitting the bars—and the back alley after last call.

Each bristles at the other’s extremes, oblivious to their own. Thus, the show is a series of escalating scenarios, where their oil and water makeup threatens to fracture the friendship beyond repair.

But how did things get to such a point? After entering the stage to raucous applause (seen by this scribe on Dec. 4, the second of two shows at NYC’s Town Hall), Jinkx and DeLa acknowledge the down time (“two years gone”) between these annual Yuletide stage shows, during which each gives their own take on the bill-paying indignities of Cameo bookings.

All is well—but soon enough, we’re introduced to an all-new character whose chemistry with DeLa does not sit well, at all, with Jinkx (a study in delayed or devoured pleasure, depending upon whether she stops short or imbibes from her omnipresent cocktail glass). It doesn’t help at all that the budding new bestie is a saccharine-sweet, larger than life, anthropomorphic peppermint retrieved from the bottom of DeLa’s comedically oversized purse.

Peppi the Peppermint (puppeteered by DeLa) is a bottomless well of mint-based puns and newborn-innocent questions about the meaning of words. The script hands Jinkx a half-dozen or so chances to stew in her juices before boiling over, when Peppi’s vocabulary comprehension skills are portrayed as wildly inconsistent (multisyllabic words are understood perfectly, while the meaning of simple ones prove elusive).

For fans of 2020’s subversively sincere and heroically explicit “The Jinkx & DeLa Holiday Special” (currently available on HULU), Peppi the Peppermint is to this show as Nanog (DeLa’s “dairy nogmother” puppet) is to that one—a seemingly harmless confidant who transfixes DeLa while alienating Jinkx. In addition to this forward-moving narrative device, “The Return of The Jinkx & DeLa Holiday Show, LIVE!” benefits from mounting several of the production numbers from “Holiday Special,” complete with a six-person dance ensemble drawn from that show’s cast.

Benefitting from on-point costumes that crystallize the essence of their character, the ensemble is especially effective in DeLa’s dense little ditty about all the essential elements of a Connecticut Christmas. Later on, in a number that takes jabs at the story of the virgin birth and its 33-year aftermath, one dancer—as the adult Jesus—becomes the cross that the Christ child is crucified on. Played as a seconds-long tableau within the song’s fast-paced choreography, it’s long-lasting satire at its most devastating and damning. 

That’s only one of several WTF? moments in the show, the best of which they save for late in the game. Having earned sustained hoots and hollers throughout the nearly two-hour show, the broad comedy gets toned down a few dozen notches, with our freshly reconciled Jinkx and DeLa in an exchange about the gift of friendship and the power of community. There’s a grounded sincerity to that moment, with no expectation, or delivery, of a punchline. That’s a tough act to sell when you’ve been playing to the back of the house all night—but it works, and it’s wonderful. 

“The Return of The Jinkx & DeLa Holiday Show, LIVE!” comes to the Los Angeles area for one show only: Saturday, December 18, at The Theatre at Ace Hotel. Produced and directed by BenDeLaCreme, co-written and co-created by BenDeLaCreme and Jinkx Monsoon, and associate produced by Kevin Heard. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit jinkxanddela.com

Saturday, December 18 – Los Angeles, CA (The Theatre at Ace Hotel)

Sunday, December 19 – San Francisco, CA (The Palace of Fine Arts Theatre)

Tuesday, December 21 – Seattle, WA (The Neptune)

Wednesday, December 22 – Seattle, WA (The Neptune)

Thursday, December 23 – Seattle, WA (The Neptune)

Friday, December 24 – Seattle, WA (The Neptune)

Sunday, December 26 – Seattle, WA (The Neptune)

Tuesday, December 28 – Vancouver, BC (Vogue Theatre)

Thursday, December 30 – Portland, OR (The Newmark)

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Golden Globes announces diverse slate of nominees

But is it diverse enough to quell controversy?

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Billy Porter and Michaela Jae Rodriquez in POSE (Image courtesy FX)

[NOTE: This article has been updated to reflect corrections from the originally published version. The previous HFPA membership included no Black members, instead of no people of color as initially reported. Additionally, it was previously stated that the awards ceremony would take place on the Golden Globes’ You Tube channel; however, a format for the presentation has yet to be officially announced.]

HOLLYWOOD – If any doubt remained that the Hollywood Foreign Press Association has fallen spectacularly out of favor, it was summarily erased by the fact that the sole celebrity on hand to help announce the list of nominations for its 2021 Golden Globe Awards was Snoop Dogg.

That’s not a dig against Snoop Dogg. The eminently lovable rapper is an icon who manages to float effortlessly between worlds within the entertainment industry, thanks to a reputation for enthusiastic self-parody and a proven tendency to be pretty much game for anything – and frankly, watching him read the service manual for a vintage sewing machine would likely be more entertaining than sitting through a list of award nominees being recited (with perfunctory reverence, of course) by even the most accomplished of screen thespians.

Still, the glaring absence of any representative from the industry which the HFPA exists to honor is proof that the organization is still a long way from recovering from the scandal that broke in the wake of a Los Angeles Times investigative report earlier this year, which revealed that its nearly 90-person membership included no Black members and provided damning details about its long-alleged unethical practices – including the influence over its voting process by gifts, paid travel, and other perks from studios and networks behind the potential nominees and winners.

The bombshell report, which was published mere days before the Golden Globes presentation last February, led to an embarrassing award show in which the revelation of the winners was eclipsed by the organization’s scramble to do damage control.

Leaning into a too-little-too-late show of diversity among the ceremony’s performers and presenters, and sending some of the HFPA’s high-level representatives to the podium in a desperate effort to spin the situation with a not-quite-apology for its previous shortcomings (followed by an unconvincing promise to do better), the organization seemed only to have dug itself deeper into the hole of bad publicity that threatened to put an end to the awards body’s 78-year existence, once and for all.

Proposed reforms to the structure and practices of the HFPA were announced, and were promptly dismissed by Time’s Up as “window-dressing platitudes.” Major players in the industry announced intentions to boycott the Golden Globes; more than a hundred PR firms threatened to cut off the HFPA from access to their clients; high-profile talent publicly denounced the organization, with three-time winner Tom Cruise even returning his trophies. Perhaps most disastrous of all, NBC – the network which had been home to the Golden Globes broadcast – announced it would not be airing another one until at least 2023, saying that “change of this magnitude takes time and work” and that “the HFPA needs time to do it right”.

Despite all this, the beleaguered organization declared its intention to continue with its annual awards presentation, and following months of restructuring – in which the HFPA has attempted to diversify its ranks by adding new members, rewritten its bylaws, forbidden the acceptance of gifts, restricted compensated travel, and undertaken an effort to revamp itself from bottom to top – has tenaciously clung to relevance by announcing the nominees for this year’s crop of films and television shows in an early morning press conference marked by the non-participation of any of the potential recipients of those honors.

This means, of course, that it’s time to start gearing up for another awards season in which the dramatic changes wrought by the Covid pandemic upon the entertainment industry are sure to have a still-unpredictable effect on the outcomes, and to engage in a game of “armchair quarterbacking” as we attempt to predict how the honors bestowed by other awards bodies will impact the winners’ circle for the most coveted industry prize of all: the Oscars.

Traditionally, the Golden Globes have been seen as a bellwether for Academy Award inclusion, with many of the nominees and winners going on to eventual Oscar glory – but given the current still-ongoing boycott of the HFPA by so many of the industry’s most influential power-players, it remains to be seen if that long-standing assumption will hold true this year.

With that in mind, it’s worth taking a look at the nominees – with an eye to the diversity among the choices, particularly the inclusion of LGBTQ-relevant nominees among the contenders.

For television, Black actors Billy Porter (“Pose”) and Omar Sy (“Lupin”), as well as South Korean actor Lee Jung-jae (“Squid Game”), received nominations as Best Lead Actor in a Drama Series, while the equivalent Lead Actress category included Black actress Uzo Aduba (“In Treatment”) and Black/Puerto Rican actress Michaela Jaé Rodriguez (“Pose”) – who also makes history by becoming the first transgender performer to be nominated in this category, a feat she also accomplished at the 2021 Emmys. In the Comedy division, Black actor Anthony Anderson (“Black-ish”) picked up a nod as Best Lead Actor, with Black actresses Issa Rae (“Insecure”) and Tracee Ellis Ross (“Black-ish”) included among the nominees for Best Lead Actress.

In the supporting categories (which are not divided into comedy and drama division), O Yeong-su (“Squid Game”) got a nod for Best Supporting Actor, with no nominees of color named within the Supporting Actress slate.

For performances in a Limited Series, Anthology Series, or Motion Picture Made for Television, Latino actor Oscar Isaac (“Scenes From a Marriage”) and French-Algerian actor Tahar Rahim (“The Serpent”) made the cut for Best Actor, while Black actress Cynthia Erivo (“Genius: Aretha”) was nominated for Best Actress.

The big screen acting categories also included several nominees of color. Though there were no performers of color in the running for Best Lead Actress in a Motion Picture Drama, the Lead Actor slate includes three Black actors – Mahershala Ali (“Swan Song”), Will Smith (“King Richard”), and Denzel Washington (“The Tragedy of Macbeth”) – among its contenders. In the Musical or Comedy division, Latino actor Anthony Ramos (“In the Heights”) scored a nomination for Lead Actor, with Latino/Polish newcomer Rachel Zegler (“West Side Story”) earning a nod for Lead Actress.

In the Supporting categories (which again, are not separated into Drama and Comedy divisions), Black performers Aunjanue Ellis (“King Richard”) and Ruth Negga (“Passing”) joined Black/Puerto Rican performer Ariana DeBose (“West Side Story”) on the list of Actress nominees, and while the Actor category contained no performers of color, deaf actor Troy Kotsur (“CODA”) made the cut, in a rare show of representation for people with disabilities.

When it comes to LGBTQ representation, however, the nominations fall considerably shorter. Among all the acting nominees, the only out members of the community are Porter and Rodriguez (each in their respective Lead Performance categories for “Pose”), Kristen Stewart (“Spencer”) and Lady Gaga (“House of Gucci”) for Lead Actress in a Motion Picture Drama, and Hannah Einbender (“Hacks”) for Best Performance by a Lead Actress in a Television Comedy. In addition to these, Azuba, Erivo, and Andrew Garfield (nominated for Best Lead Actor in a Motion Picture Musical or Comedy for “tick, tick… Boom!”) are noted for their vocal LGBTQ advocacy as allies. 

While nominees Benedict Cumberbatch and Kodi Smit-McPhee (nominated for Lead and Supporting Actor, respectively, in a Motion Picture Drama for “The Power of the Dog”) play queer characters, both identify as straight in real life. The same is true for Ewan McGregor, nominated as Best Actor in a Limited Series for his star turn as the title character in “Halston”.

Finally, it’s worth mentioning that the Best Director of a Motion Picture category, long dominated exclusively by men, this year includes two women: Jane Campion (“The Power of the Dog”) and Maggie Gyllenhall (“The Lost Daughter”)

Whether or not these nominees – or any of the others, for that matter – end up following up their recognition today with nods or wins on Oscar night remains to be seen. In the meantime, we can find out who will take the HFPA’s honors on January 9, when the Golden Globes are scheduled to take place. According to a representative from Sunshine Sachs (the PR firm representing the HFPA), a format for the presentation has yet to be determined, so it’s still unclear if we will get a chance to see who actually shows up to claim a prize from an organization now relegated to pariah status by most of Hollywood.

A complete list of nominations is below.

Best Television Series, Musical or Comedy

“The Great” (Hulu)

“Hacks” (HBO/HBO Max)

“Only Murders in the Building” (Hulu)

“Reservation Dogs” (FX on Hulu) 

“Ted Lasso” (Apple TV Plus)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series, Drama

Brian Cox (“Succession”)

Lee Jung-jae (“Squid Game”)

Billy Porter (“Pose”)

Jeremy Strong (“Succession”)

Omar Sy (“Lupin)

Best Performance by an Actress, Limited Series, Anthology Series or a Motion Picture made for Television

Jessica Chastain (“Scenes From a Marriage”)

Cynthia Erivo (“Genius: Aretha”)
 
Elizabeth Olsen (“WandaVision“) 

Margaret Qualley (“Maid”)

Kate Winslet (“Mare of Easttown”)

Best Director, Motion Picture

Kenneth Branagh (“Belfast”) 

Jane Campion (“The Power of the Dog”)

Maggie Gyllenhaal (“The Lost Daughter”)

Steven Spielberg (“West Side Story”) 

Denis Villeneuve (“Dune”) 

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy

Marion Cotillard (“Annette”)

Alana Haim (“Licorice Pizza”) 

Jennifer Lawrence (“Don’t Look Up”) 

Emma Stone (“Cruella”)

Rachel Zegler (“West Side Story”)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture, Drama

Mahershala Ali (“Swan Song”)

Javier Bardem (“Being the Ricardos”)

Benedict Cumberbatch (“The Power of the Dog”) 

Will Smith (“King Richard”) 

Denzel Washington (“The Tragedy of Macbeth”) 

Best Television Series, Drama

“Lupin” (Netflix)

“The Morning Show” (Apple TV Plus)

“Pose” (FX)

“Squid Game” (Netflix)

“Succession” (HBO/HBO Max)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series, Drama

Uzo Aduba (“In Treatment”)

Jennifer Aniston (“The Morning Show”)

Christine Baranski (“The Good Fight)

Elisabeth Moss (“The Handmaid’s Tale”)

Michaela Jaé Rodriguez (“Pose”)

Best Performance by an Actor, Limited Series, Anthology Series or Motion Picture made for Television

Paul Bettany (“WandaVision”)

Oscar Isaac (“Scenes From a Marriage”)

Michael Keaton (“Dopesick”)

Ewan McGregor (“Halston”)

Tahar Rahim (“The Serpent”)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy

Leonardo DiCaprio (“Don’t Look Up”) 

Peter Dinklage (“Cyrano”) 

Andrew Garfield (“Tick, Tick … Boom!”) 

Cooper Hoffman (“Licorice Pizza”)

Anthony Ramos (“In the Heights”)

Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture

Ben Affleck (“The Tender Bar”) 

Jamie Dornan (“Belfast”) 

Ciarán Hinds (“Belfast”) 

Troy Kotsur (“CODA”) 

Kodi Smit-McPhee (“The Power of the Dog”)

Best Original Score, Motion Picture

“The French Dispatch” (Searchlight Pictures) — Alexandre Desplat 

“Encanto” (Walt Disney Pictures) — Germaine Franco

“The Power of the Dog” (Netflix) — Jonny Greenwood 

“Parallel Mothers” (Sony Pictures Classic) — Alberto Iglesias 

“Dune” (Warner Bros.) — Hans Zimmer

Best Actress in a TV Series, Musical or Comedy

Hannah Einbinder (“Hacks”)

Elle Fanning (“The Great”)

Issa Rae (“Insecure”)

Tracee Ellis Ross (“Black-ish”)

Jean Smart (“Hacks”)

Best Limited Series, Anthology Series or a Motion Picture made for Television

“Dopesick” (Hulu)

“Impeachment: American Crime Story” (FX)

“Maid” (Netflix) 

“Mare of Easttown” (HBO/HBO Max)

“The Underground Railroad” (Amazon Prime Video)

Best Supporting Actor, Television

Billy Crudup (“The Morning Show”)

Kieran Culkin (“Succession”)

Mark Duplass (“The Morning Show”)

Brett Goldstein (“Ted Lasso”)

O Yeong-su (“Squid Game”)

Best Picture, Musical or Comedy

“Cyrano” (MGM)

“Don’t Look Up” (Netflix) 

“Licorice Pizza” (MGM) 

“Tick, Tick … Boom!” (Netflix) 

“West Side Story” (20th Century Studios / Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures)

Best Supporting Actress, Motion Picture

Caitríona Balfe (“Belfast”) 

Ariana DeBose (“West Side Story”) 

Kirsten Dunst (“The Power of the Dog”) 

Aunjanue Ellis (“King Richard”) 

Ruth Negga (“Passing”)

Best Picture, Foreign Language

“Compartment No. 6” (Sony Pictures Classics) — Finland, Russia, Germany

“Drive My Car” (Janus Films) — Japan

“The Hand of God” (Netflix) — Italy

“A Hero” (Amazon Studios) — France, Iran

“Parallel Mothers” (Sony Pictures Classics) — Spain

Best Screenplay, Motion Picture

Paul Thomas Anderson — “Licorice Pizza” (MGM/United Artists Releasing) 

Kenneth Branagh — “Belfast” (Focus Features) 

Jane Campion — “The Power of the Dog” (Netflix) 

Adam McKay — “Don’t Look Up” (Netflix)

Aaron Sorkin — “Being the Ricardos” (Amazon Studios)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture, Drama

Jessica Chastain (“The Eyes of Tammy Faye”)

Olivia Colman (“The Lost Daughter”) 

Nicole Kidman (“Being the Ricardos”)

Lady Gaga (“House of Gucci”) 

Kristen Stewart (“Spencer”) 

Best Motion Picture, Drama

“Belfast” (Focus Features) 

“CODA” (Apple) 

“Dune” (Warner Bros.) 

“King Richard” (Warner Bros.) 

“The Power of the Dog” (Netflix) 

Best Television Actor, Musical / Comedy Series

Anthony Anderson (“Black-ish”)

Nicholas Hoult (“The Great”)

Steve Martin (“Only Murders in the Building”)

Martin Short (“Only Murders in the Building”)

Jason Sudeikis (“Ted Lasso”)

Best Supporting Actress, Television

Jennifer Coolidge (“White Lotus”)

Kaitlyn Dever (“Dopesick”)

Andie MacDowell (“Maid”)

Sarah Snook (“Succession”)

Hannah Waddingham (“Ted Lasso”)

Best Original Song, Motion Picture

“Be Alive” from “King Richard” (Warner Bros.) — Beyoncé Knowles-Carter, Dixson 

“Dos Orugitas” from “Encanto” (Walt Disney Pictures) — Lin-Manuel Miranda 

“Down to Joy” from “Belfast” (Focus Features) — Van Morrison 

“Here I Am (Singing My Way Home)” from “Respect” (MGM/United Artists Releasing) — Jamie Hartman, Jennifer Hudson, Carole King 

“No Time to Die” from “No Time to Die” (MGM/United Artists Releasing) — Billie Eilish, Finneas O’Connell 

Best Motion Picture, Animated

“Encanto” (Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures) 

“Flee” (Neon) 

“Luca” (Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures) 

“My Sunny Maad” (Totem Films)

“Raya and the Last Dragon” (Walt Disney Studios)

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Belinda Carlisle brings a heavenly Christmas Bash December 16th

Her work evolves beyond the demands of the pop market while never losing its hooks and whimsy. it reflects Belinda’s evolving life

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Courtesy of Belinda Carlise

HOLLYWOOD – On December 16th, 7pm, the city of West Hollywood transforms into a piece of “Heaven on Earth.” An angelic supernatural deity from the sky won’t be delivering this gift, but rather an angel from iconic pop paradise.

That night, Belinda Carlisle makes a grand entrance and gives an eager audience the presence of a queen of pop, the most recent inductee to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame along with her group, The Go-Gos.

It will be on that night that Belinda Carlisle hosts THE party event of the season with co-host, drag superstar, Trixie Mattel. One sings, one throws comedic shade, and a packed room at the Abbey will be losing their collective minds.  Not that the party itself isn’t all the reason you would need to get it on your calendar, the evening benefits a fantastic charity, The Animal People Alliance (APA), that intertwines the love for animals with the salve to human suffering.

Courtesy of Trixie Mattel

APA’s charter reads: “To provide high quality and compassionate care, of the highest standards, to neglected street animals in India and Thailand. We train and employ vulnerable people from the community, and pay living wages that help them improve their standard of living.”   The organization, by employing people who would otherwise be stateless and/or in poverty, has treated over 16000 street animals since 2014. Their programs for animals include rabies vaccinations, sterilizations and other emergency health aid.

Belinda sat down with me this week on the podcast RATED LGBT RADIO to talk about her life, her amazing career, her party and the strength she has achieved in standing up to both inner and outer demons.

She survives. She fearlessly opens herself up, and if anyone scrutinizes her past… she will lead the way.  She happily tells of being a member of the most successful all-women pop bands in history.  They sang and wrote their own songs, they played their own instruments. They did it on their terms. No men were needed or required. She candidly shares about her struggles with eating disorders and drug addiction. 

Belinda shows profound compassion for those struggling with addiction and darkness, “Addiction is a sickness…it is a disease of perception, you can’t see your effect on other people… It is a trap you feel you can’t get out of. Every addict has a heart and a humanity that is obscured by addiction. It is a horrible, horrible thing for anyone to go through. It is hard to remember that there is a heart under all that, there is something divine under all that darkness.”

Her interest focuses more on what came after she embarked on recovery  “My life is much more exciting since sobriety, even more exciting than the hey day with the Go-Gos. For anyone out there who is worried about aging, or life being over at a certain point—it’s not. Life is just the most amazing miracle and privilege.”

Her significance for the LGBTQ community, impacts many of the most vulnerable.  She is the mom of a gay man, activist and writer, James Duke Mason. His birth made her examine the trajectory of fame, drugs, and rock & roll in which she was on, careening threateningly close to disaster and death.

She had settled comfortably into maternal nurturement when Duke came out to her at the age of 14. Belinda had been impressed with Duke’s ability to explain the situation to her. She found out that he had been online with PFLAG for weeks learning about how to present his news to her, information to give and educated about key talking points. 

Appreciating their real life help of a young person in need, Belinda vehemently supported PFLAG, the Trevor Project and others ever since. “I am so glad I have a gay son, I can’t even tell you,” she says.

Artistically, she also continues to thrive.  The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame finally inducted the Go-Gos this year.  It was an honor 15 years in the making.  It should have been an obvious choice to put them there.

As the first all-female group making it big, they sang, wrote every note and played every instruments. The Go-Go’s, a 2020 American/Irish/Canadian documentary film directed and produced by Alison Ellwood, cast attention on the Hall of Fame oversight, and essentially made the case for how special the group actually was.

Belinda also recently released a new single Get Together a cover of the 1967 Youngbloods hit. The Youngbloods sang it at Woodstock in 1969 to make a statement about the divisions of the Viet Nam era in America.

Belinda sings it now, her voice pure, mature and as an anthem making a plea, if not a motherly order, to reconsider the divisions we are experiencing today.  She says, “We live in this age of outrage.  This song is ‘ok people, CHILL OUT’. All this divisiveness is not going to get us anywhere. It’s timely.”

Beyond Get Together, Belinda works on more new music including singles and a new album.  She continues to produce with the top song creators of the industry including award winning song writer Diane Warren and Go-Gos dates at the end of the year.

Her work evolves beyond the demands of the pop market while never losing its hooks and whimsy. it reflects the channeling of Belinda’s evolving life.  When she lived in France, she released a French collection.

As she delved into spirituality and the culture of Thailand, she released the powerful Wilder Shores, which blended a spiritual mantra into pop hooks. “Chanting is a science, it has a super power. It is not airy fairy,” she states.

The fact is, Belinda Carlisle continues arriving and thrilling.  She does not need to prove herself to anyone.  She has defined the next thirty years of her life as philanthropy.  

“I just wing it as I go along. I learned what it is like to work from the heart. Work in a way where you don’t care about any kind of outcome. That is how I am working now. I am just having fun, and doing just what I want. I am really lucky that way,” she declares.

Her party on December 16th at the Abbey appears right on track to bear that out.

Love, humanity, care of animals and a major splash of fabulousness enveloping an enthused audience.

In other words, pure Belinda.

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Listen to the full interview:

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Rob Watson is the host of RATED LGBT RADIO, a national podcast and he’s one of the founders of the evolequals.com.

A gay dad, business man, community activist and a blogger/writer, Watson is a contributor to the Los Angeles Blade covering entertainment, film, television, and culture with occasional politics tossed in.

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