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Hungarian Parliament approves Anti-LGBTQ law 157-1

“These proposals, which have dark echoes of Russia’s anti-gay “propaganda law”, will further stigmatize LGBTQI people.”

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Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban (Screenshot via BBC World News)

BUDAPEST – Hungary’s National Assembly approved legislation Tuesday that prohibits sharing with anyone under the age of 18 any material that portrays or describes homosexuality or gender identity linking it to another legislative measure by amendment that purports to protect minors against paedophilia.

Fidesz, the conservative ruling party of Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban, introduced the legislation and approved the bill in a 157-1 vote. One independent lawmaker voted against it. All other opposition parties boycotted the voting session in protest the Associated Press reported.

Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International had both denounced the measure, saying it was wrong to conflate LGBTQ people with paedophilia.

“These proposals, which have dark echoes of Russia’s anti-gay “propaganda law”, will further stigmatize LGBTI people, exposing them to greater discrimination in what is already a hostile environment,” David Vig, director of Hungary’s branch of Amnesty International told a massive crowd that assembled yesterday in front of the Parliamentarian building in Central Budapest.

“We have a lot to do before tomorrow’s vote: We have to tell, we have to write to every member of Parliament, why this bill is anti-child, anti-family and anti-human,” he added.

Lydia Gall, a senior researcher at Human Rights Watch, said equating sexual and gender diversity with paedophilia hurt the dignity of LGBT people and risked putting them in danger.

Gall called the legislation “a cynical, distasteful and deliberate attempt by the Orban government to trample the rights of LGBT people and essentially make them invisible in Hungarian society.” 

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Puerto Rico activists condemn police raid on LGBTQ-friendly bar

More than 20 officers descended on Loverbar near the University of Puerto Rico

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Loverbar (Photo via Twitter)

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — Activists in Puerto Rico have condemned a police raid on an LGBTQ-friendly bar that took place on Thursday night.

Local media reports indicate more than 20 officers with the San Juan Municipal Police Department entered Loverbar, which is near the campus of the University of Puerto Rico, at around 11 p.m.

A video posted to social media shows that some of the officers who entered the bar were armed with what appear to be shot guns.

Media reports cite local authorities who said Loverbar did not have the necessary permits to operate as a bar, and the officers arrived there to fine them. San Juan Mayor Miguel Romero in a statement said officers fined Loverbar and seven other businesses in the city on Thursday for either not having the necessary permits or excessive noise.

“The Municipal Police of San Juan led by Miguel Romero intervened last night with a queer bar,” tweeted Pedro Julio Serrano, founder of Puerto Rico Para [email protected], a Puerto Rican LGBTQ advocacy group. “This reminds us of a time when LGBTQI+ people were prosecuted, criminalized and villified.”

“We won’t tolerate homophobia and transphobia in San Juan,” added Serrano.

Comité Amplio Para la Búsqueda de Equidad (CABE), another Puerto Rican LGBTQ advocacy group, has called for an “exhaustive and independent investigation into the excessive use of force and intimidation by the Municipal Police of San Juan last night” at Loverbar.

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Argentina becomes first Latin America country to issue non-binary IDs

Country remains at forefront of trans, gender non-conforming rights

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(Photo by Bigstock)

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina — Argentina on Wednesday became the first country in Latin America to issue ID cards that are specifically for non-binary people.

President Alberto Fernández issued a decree that allows non-binary Argentines to choose an “X” gender marker on their National Identity Document or DNI.

“The recognition of the gender identity of people who identify themselves outside gender binary norms is a big advance for the entire society, because it puts to an end the mandatory imposition of ‘male’ or ‘female’ categories,” reads Fernández’s decree. “The decree implements the rights recognized under the Gender Identity Law, interpreting its scope beyond binaryism.”

The Gender Rights Law that took effect in 2012, among other things, allows Argentines to legally change their gender without medical intervention. Fernández last September signed a decree that requires at least 1 percent of all jobs in the country’s public sector to go to transgender people.

Marcela Romero, a Buenos Aires-based trans activist who is also a member of REDLACTRANS (The Latin America and Caribbean Network of Transgender People) Executive Board, in a statement said the decree “once again positions Argentina” as a world leader in extending rights to gender non-conforming people.

Mariano Ruiz, another Argentine LGBTQ rights activist, echoed Romero.

“The recognition of the identity of non-binary people by the State leaves no doubt about the interpretation of the Gender Identity Law,” Ruiz told the Los Angeles Blade on Wednesday.

Ruiz also noted the public sector employment law is named after two trans activists — Diana Sacayán, who was killed in 2016, and Lohana Berlina, who died in 2012.

“Once again and after the recent approval of the Diana Sacayán-Lohana Berlina Labor Quota Law, the Argentine government has shown its firm commitment to sexual and gender diversity and sets the course for where the Latin America region should go,” said Ruiz. “We hope that this is only the beginning and we will soon have a new law against discriminatory acts, a comprehensive law for trans people and a new law for HIV and viral hepatitis.”

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Chilean Senate approves marriage equality bill

President Sebastián Piñera has urged lawmakers to support measure

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The Chilean Congress in Valparaíso, Chile. (Washington Blade photo by Michael K. Lavers)

VALPARAÍSO, Chile — The Chilean Senate on Wednesday by a 28-14 vote margin approved a bill that would extend marriage rights to same-sex couples.

The vote took place less than a month after President Sebastián Piñera announced he supports marriage equality and urged lawmakers in the South American country to quickly act on the issue. The bill now goes to the Chilean House of Representatives.

The Movement for Homosexual Integration and Liberation (Movilh), a Chilean LGBTQ advocacy group, described the vote as a “triumph of justice and equality.”

“The Senate, four years after of processing, finally approves and dispatches (the) marriage equality (bill),” tweeted the organization. “The end of discrimination against same-sex partners and same-sex parents is near. A better path for new generations.”

Lorena Recabarren, undersecretary for human rights in Chile’s Justice Ministry, in a statement applauded Piñera for his position in support of the bill. Recabarren stressed the president will continue to urge members of the House of Representatives to quickly approve it.

“Our goal is that this bill gets done as soon as possible and will be signed into law for everyone in our country,” she said.

Same-sex couples have been able to enter into civil unions in Chile since 2015.

Movilh in 2012 filed a lawsuit with the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights on behalf of three same-sex couples who were seeking marriage rights in the country. The group entered into an agreement with the Chilean government over marriage equality and adoption rights for same-sex couples, but withdrew from it last October.

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