Connect with us

Viewpoint

Not a sports fan? Celebrate Carl Nassib anyway

Nassib’s coming out will do wonders for closeted gay, lesbian, bisexual, trans and queer youth and adults who hesitate to live authentically

Published

on

Graphic via the Los Angeles Blade

HARTFORD, Ct. – With a simple, handheld selfie video posted to Instagram Monday, Carl Nassib of the Las Vegas Raiders tackled homophobia for us all.  And for everyone who’s not a sports fan and doesn’t know football lingo, this is for you. 

This is the time to buy your first NFL jersey, the one with 94 on the front and “NASSIB” on the back. It’s the hottest seller right now

This is the time to join Nassib and everyone who’s paying it forward by donating to The Trevor Project, a nonprofit organization that serves LGBTQ youth in crisis with resources and a 24/7 suicide prevention hotline for everyone 24 and under. The NFL on Tuesday matched Nassib’s donation of $100,000. 

Nassib’s former coach at Penn State, James Franklin, gave the group $10,000.

All that money, and attention, is going to help struggling queer kids, some out, many still closeted. “We’ve seen a 50% increase in our daily online donations since the announcement yesterday,” Rob Todaro, communications manager for The Trevor Project told the Los Angeles Blade. “Some of the donations even have heartwarming notes referencing Carl’s coming out, showing acceptance for LGBTQ young people, and supporting LGBTQ youth mental health. In addition, traffic to The Trevor Project’s website increased by more than 350% yesterday into today.”

So how does that help? “This donation will help us train more crisis counselors, continue to provide all of our crisis services 24/7 and for free, and expand our innovative advocacy, research, and education programs,” Todaro told the Blade. 

In his 60-second coming out video, this pro football player has done more for the LGBTQ community than anyone else this Pride Month, from pop stars to the president

And no doubt Nassib’s coming out will do wonders for closeted gay, lesbian, bisexual, trans and queer youth and adults who hesitate to live authentically. “Young LGBTQ kids are 5x more likely than their straight friends to consider suicide,” Nassib wrote in part of his Instagram post. “Studies have shown that all it takes is one accepting adult to decrease the risk of an LGBTQ kid attempting suicide by 40%.” 

This is the time to be that adult. Especially if you’re like me, and you never had an LGBTQ role model to inspire you, to encourage you to leave the closet, or at least to take the steps necessary to prepare for that first step. 

Like Nassib, I was the first one in my line of work to come out. In 2013, I was the first working journalist in American network TV news to come out as transgender. Like Nassib, I received a warm welcome from my bosses and colleagues at ABC News. But this was eight years ago, when Chaz Bono and Laverne Cox were the only prominent examples in pop culture; although I followed in the footsteps of journalism pioneers Christina Kahrl and Ina Fried, being trans was still a relatively unknown phenomenon in TV newsrooms. And the tabloids and shockjocks treated me like some kind of freak. It was a different time. 

But despite ups and many downs, I survived and am living happily. So is Collin Martin, an out professional soccer player who is the only other active pro athlete in America’s big 5 major sports of baseball, football, hockey and soccer. So are out gay retired football players Ryan O’Callaghan, Esera Tuaolo and Wade Davis and the only living out former MLB player, Billy Bean. 

And let’s not forget that there are nonbinary, lesbian, gay and trans women who are athletes who haven’t faced the same level of homophobia in their sports of soccer, basketball, roller derby, rugby and college sports. Why is it the acceptance found in women’s sports can’t also be found in those played by men? 

“The homophobia of men’s sports culture has been well documented,” the awesome Britni de la Cretaz wrote for NBC about Nassib’s coming out being seen as a turning point for male sports. “A 2018 study from the Human Rights Campaign found that 84 percent of Americans had witnessed anti-LGBTQ+ attitudes in sports, and the U.S. ranks the worst when it comes to homophobia in athletics,” according to Time magazine.

But hang on. British researcher Dr. Eric Anderson argues that, as more gays like Nassib find acceptance, the times they are a’changing. 

“I have definitively shown that across the U.K., and even in the U.S., heterosexual men are valuing a softer form of masculinity. I have even showed varying rates of heterosexual men kissing one another, among 11 universities in the United States, and at universities in Australia and the UK. The very fear of even being perceived to be gay — this softer form of masculinity — is evaporating,” Anderson wrote in an op-ed in November 2020

“As sporting cultures continue to embrace social change, there has been a significant increase in elite-level lesbian, gay, and bisexual athletes who have publicly come out of the closet. Rather than rejection and ostracism from sport—as has historically been the case—these athletes have been embraced, celebrated, and propelled to stardom as symbols of sport’s ongoing transformation towards inclusion.

“I am not saying that there is no homophobia in sport. Decreasing homophobia is an uneven social movement that varies by geographical and demographic difference.

“However, it is no longer valid to argue that team sports are bastions of homophobic men, and certainly not compared to the general population. Such an assertion would be to judge them without evidence, or to extrapolate from one to the whole. This is the very nature of prejudice.”

So even if you don’t know the difference between a goalpost and a foul pole, or how a touchdown differs from a home run, embrace Carl Nassib and celebrate his coming out. For what he is doing for football is something that someday may make the closet merely a place to keep our clothes.

Dawn Ennis is a senior reporter and the Sports writer for the LA Blade. Ennis is the professor of Sports Journalism in the Journalism and Communications Media Studies Department at the University of Hartford, Connecticut.

In addition she has written as a contributor for Forbes, The Daily Beast, CT Voice, and as a broadcast anchor on Rise Up with Dawn Ennis on WHCI (West Hartford Community Interactive  television-cable-YouTube) and CT Voice OutLoud on WTNH- TV plus as a freelance reporter for GLAAD Media and Star Trek dot com.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Viewpoint

Senators Manchin and Capito: We need your support

Equality Act would protect LGBTQ West Virginians

Published

on

Danielle Stewart (Photo courtesy of Danielle Stewart)

I’ll never forget the day the Common Council for the city of Beckley, W.Va., voted to amend our nondiscrimination ordinance to protect individuals from discrimination based on their gender identity and sexual orientation. It was heart-warming to see the freedom and dignity of all LGBTQ people affirmed in my home community. It’s made Beckley stronger and a brighter place to live, work, and visit.

As a transgender veteran, the passage of the ordinance felt especially fulfilling to me. I served my country proudly for 23 years, including three combat tours—two to Iraq and one to Afghanistan—earning three bronze stars for my service, in addition to other awards. 

When I returned home, I was left vulnerable to discrimination in key areas of life. That’s because West Virginia is one of 29 states where LGBTQ people are not protected by either an explicit statewide law, or federal protections prohibiting discrimination in housing, healthcare, and public spaces like restaurants and stores. 

I’m grateful to have protections in Beckley, but when I leave the city or visit a place where discrimination is allowed, I lose that security. It bothers me that I served my country, deployed to places where many people did not want to go, and yet I’m told in most of this country that I don’t deserve to be protected and guaranteed respect and dignity. As service members, we take the oath to protect the Constitution of the United States, and I believe that the Constitution includes and protects all of us; “We the People” means everyone. 

I came out for the first time to anyone in 2010, but it wasn’t until years later, after I retired from the Army, that I came out more publicly. The government policy at the time denied open service to transgender people. The Army spent years and millions of dollars training me, and other transgender people, to protect our freedom and nation; yet we would be discharged if we tried to serve as our authentic selves. I cannot fathom why, in an all-volunteer military, we would turn away qualified people.

My experience in the military gave me a glimpse of anti-LGBTQ discrimination, and I’m glad that categorical employment discrimination is no longer government’s policy. Still, discrimination continues to happen. One of my friends who is transgender got a job after many rejections, but was quickly taunted by her employer and fellow employees using her pre-transition name, intentionally called the wrong pronouns, and generally creating a hostile work environment. A gay male couple in my neighborhood were one of the first same-sex couples to marry in West Virginia; but two weeks later one of the men was fired, supposedly for “performance issues” that had never surfaced prior to his marriage. I personally have been misgendered and harassed at a fast food restaurant nearby, the workers at which repeatedly ignored me when I corrected their use of “sir” and male pronouns. 

It’s well past time that we address this, by taking action at the federal level. Right now, the Equality Act is pending in the U.S. Senate, having already passed the House of Representatives with bipartisan support. We need our senators—including Sens. Joe Manchin and Shelley Moore Capito—to come aboard and support the passage of comprehensive federal protections. 

Our senators have the opportunity to make bipartisan history, to say, together, “We believe in equality in West Virginia.” With a spotlight on our state like never before, it’s up to our senators to illuminate the path forward, get to work, and ensure everyone has a chance to thrive.

It’s been a scary year to be transgender, as state after state passes demeaning anti-transgender laws. These bills send a pervasive, cruel message that transgender people are not welcome. It pains me to say that right now, I am the most guarded that I have ever been in the United States, nearly as guarded as I was while deployed for combat overseas. That’s a sad reality, and there’s really only one way to fix it.

We need to pass the Equality Act. We need to protect all LGBTQ Americans, including veterans like me. We need to live up to West Virginia’s state motto: “Mountaineers Are Always Free.”

Major Danielle Stewart lives in Beckley, W.Va. She currently serves as the chair of the city’s Human Rights Commission as well as on the board of directors of numerous nonprofits.

Danielle Stewart maybe reached at: [email protected]

Continue Reading

Viewpoint

Pledge supporting an Israeli queer film festival a show of solidarity that shouldn’t be needed

Supporters of TLVFest boycott denounced ‘pinkwashing’

Published

on

TLVFest (Photo courtesy of Max Rosenblum)

Last year, when I discovered that over 130 filmmakers and artists signed a pledge to boycott Tel Aviv’s TLVFest, a locally sponsored queer film festival, in solidarity with LGBTQ+ Palestinians, my heart broke.

The signatories denounced “pinkwashing,” a term frequently deployed by supporters of the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement which falsely accuses Israel of pointing to our respect for LGBTQ+ rights as a way to distract from the government’s denial of rights to Palestinians. 

The news didn’t just hurt because I’m from Tel Aviv, or because I am a gay man. It hurt because rather than lift up queer Israelis or Palestinians, it actually tore us down. 

So I was relieved last week to see more than 200 members of the entertainment industry—including notable names like Mila Kunis, Neil Patrick Harris and Dame Helen Mirren—sign a letter rejecting the cultural boycott of TLVFest. The letter expressed solidarity with “all the participating filmmakers against the divisive rhetoric espoused by boycott activists who seek to misinform, bully and intimidate artists.”

While I commend these brave individuals for taking this stand, the controversy begs the question: How is it that, in 2021, a group of actors, musicians and film executives even needs to vocalize support for artistic freedom while denouncing those who call to boycott LGBTQ+ filmmakers? Such a letter would never have been necessary in defense of a queer film festival in any other country.

While this boycott claims to serve the interest of oppressed minorities, the logic of the pinkwashing accusation effectively delegitimizes any advancements made in Israeli LGBTQ+ rights, weaponizing victories for our community against us. And there are many victories to cite.

In 2019, for example, Israel’s Supreme Court ruled against discriminatory surrogacy laws targeting gay men. Days before that, Israel’s Justice Ministry approved new rules allowing trans Israelis to change their gender on their IDs without undergoing surgery. And of course, gay Israelis including myself have been serving openly in the military since 1993.

Israel is not perfect, but its flaws are not good enough reasons to wholly reject its achievements. When police brutality occurs in the United States, that doesn’t mean we refuse to attend celebrations of LGBTQ+ Americans. Whether in America or Israel, a country’s most marginalized individuals should not be forced to pay a price for the misdeeds of their governments. 

By declining to take part in TLVFest, those crusading against alleged pinkwashing also erase the important work done by queer Israelis who, like LGBTQ+ people around the world, are often at odds with our own country’s government. We too are dissenting voices in Israel, speaking out against the very policies that these boycotting filmmakers detest and working to reverse the status quo in the Palestinian territories. For example, while serving as a humanitarian officer in the Israeli Defense Forces, I helped at-risk queer Palestinians seek asylum under the Israeli Ministry of Interior. 

Perhaps more disturbing than invalidating Israel’s LGBTQ+ progress and diminishing queer Israeli voices is how the activists behind this boycott appear, like most in the BDS movement, to be singularly focused on Israel. Meanwhile, the deplorable treatment of LGBTQ+ Palestinians by their own government gets little to no attention. 

In 2019, Palestinian Security Forces spokesperson, Col. Louai Irzeiqat, described LGBTQ+ activism as “a blow to, and violation of, the ideals and values of Palestinian society.” This followed the Palestinian Authority’s decision to ban a Palestinian gay and transgender rights group from holding events in the West Bank, threatening to arrest any participants. It’s not surprising then that 95 percent of Palestinians believe that homosexuality is “unacceptable.”

The failure to recognize, or at least hold equally accountable, the Palestinian regime for its crimes against LGBTQ+ Palestinians demonstrates a stark double standard that singles out Israel while emboldening the discrimination of Palestinian oppressors. So, to those who claim to truly want to help Palestinians—particularly queer ones—I encourage you to lift up LGBTQ+ Israelis and Palestinians, not boycott us. 

Two hundred celebrities seem to understand that this is a much more effective way to fight for LGBTQ+ rights. It’d be nice if the rest of the activist community could do the same.

Hen Mazzig, an Israeli Mizrahi Jewish writer and LGBTQ+ advocate, is editor-at-large of the J’accuse Coalition for Justice and a Senior Fellow at the Tel Aviv Instituteand. Follow him: @HenMazzig

Continue Reading

Viewpoint

Global community needs to help save Brazil’s democracy

Jair Bolsonaro trying to undermine judicial independence, LGBTQ rights

Published

on

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro addresses the U.N. General Assembly on Sept. 21, 2021.

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro used the country’s independence holiday, Sept. 7, to rally his supporters in protests against Brazil’s democratic institutions, particularly the judiciary; basically the only institution at present that checks the president’s authoritarian aspirations. Over the past two decades, the Supreme Court has provided a safe space for human rights protections, specifically LGBTQI+ rights. If the court falls, it would be the downfall of Brazil’s democracy, posing a threat to its diversity.

Over the past decade, the Brazilian LGBTQI+ community has accomplished historical victories through numerous Supreme Court rulings, including a ruling in 2013 to legalize gay marriage. While these victories were celebrated, they were also bittersweet. As the LGBTQI+ community gained ground in equality; Bolsonaro’s far-right party gained political space, and unfortunately, the hearts of some of my dearest family members.

Bolsonaro’s accession to power in 2018 came with a wave of conservative, reactionary and LGBTQI+phobic discourse that shook every aspect of Brazil’s public and private life. As the minds of minorities in the country darkened and as I fought against depression, I saw my friends suddenly rushing to register their partnerships or change their civil names fearing that the rulings allowing for their rights could be overturned. Three years later, with judicial independence under attack, our nightmares are becoming a reality.

Bolsonaro’s government has significantly impacted the LGBTQI+ movement by abolishing the LGBTQI+ National Council and significant budget cuts to Brazil’s once globally recognized HIV/AIDS prevention program. Moreover, policies aiming to fight racism or promoting gender equality are also being abandoned or defunded.

Inflation, hunger, unemployment and extreme poverty are on the rise. In the case of further democratic erosion, we are getting the conditions set for a humanitarian crisis in Brazil.

Brazil’s stability is of interest to the entire region and the world. Considering the country’s influence in Latin America, a coup could generate a domino effect across the continent. Hence, political, social, and economic international stakeholders should raise awareness and pressuring Bolsonaro’s administration

Historically, social minorities are the first ones to be sacrificed in political turmoil. As I wrote this text, news came along that indigenous land rights are being bargained and that Bolsonaro will take this attack on the environment to his speech at the United Nations. As has happened in Poland and Hungary, soon Bolsonaro will turn his gun to the LGBTQI+ community. It is clear by now that Bolsonaro envisions Brazil as a leader of far-right conservatism in the world.

That is why we need the global community to stand with us. As we take to the streets calling for impeachment, Bolsonaro still counts with the support of important stakeholders. Businesspeople are among the president’s most supportive groups, despite the economic disaster we have been through. If they can’t see the obvious internal consequences of eroding democracy, then international pressure should make them see it.

We need clear statements by political parties, foreign media, think tanks, financial groups, etc., that the attacks on Brazil’s institutions and minorities will cost the economic sector money. With this, we can unlock the impeachment process and rebuild Brazil’s legacy as a country that celebrates diversity.

Egerton Neto is the international coordinator for Aliança Nacional LGBTI+ in Brazil and Master of Public Policy candidate at the London School of Economics.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement

Follow Us @LosAngelesBlade

Sign Up for Blade eBlasts

Popular