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“Hamilton” creators donate monetary damages to LGBTQ+ group

A Texas church performed an unauthorized production of the acclaimed Broadway musical with the addition of homophobic content

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Photo Credit: County of Los Angeles

MCALLEN, Tx – Capping a three-week conflict that attracted national media attention, the creators of “Hamilton” said they will donate monetary damages collected from a Texas church that performed an unauthorized production of the acclaimed Broadway musical and altered it with the addition of homophobic content. 

A statement published on Instagram Tuesday on behalf of Door Christian Fellowship McAllen Church (“Door McAllen”) and its pastor Roman Gutierrez apologizes to the creator and producers of “Hamilton” for using the music and dialogue and changing them without permission. 

While the post made no acknowledgement of Door McAllen’s choice to liken homosexuality to drug and alcohol addiction in its unauthorized alteration of its unauthorized production on August 5, “Hamilton” affirmed its support for the LGBTQ+ community with the decision to give the monetary damages to the South Texas Equality Project.

The LGBTQ+ group did not immediately respond to requests for comment on its pending receipt of the damages, whose value has not been disclosed. 

“Hamilton” fans discovered the performance after Door McAllen streamed the show on its YouTube channel, where it was subsequently cut into clips that were widely circulated on Twitter and other social media platforms – often accompanied by the hashtag #Scamalton and objections to musical’s adulteration. 

Many of the clips show the scene in which Victor Lopez, another Door McAllen pastor, delivers a sermon in which he says: “Maybe you struggle with alcohol, with drugs — with homosexuality — maybe you struggle with other things in life, your finances, whatever. God can help you tonight.”

In addition to its homophobia, the online attention exposed what theater blog OneStage called Door McAllen’s “perfect storm” of copyright and intellectual property (IP) law violations: “The church did not have permission to perform the show, make changes to its lyrics, use its logo, use copyrighted music as a backing track, advertise the production, and stream it on YouTube.” 

“Hamilton” Creator Lin Manuel Miranda was made aware of the unauthorized production of his musical amid the growing backlash against it, issuing a statement where he said, “Grateful to all of you who reached out about this illegal, unauthorized production. Now lawyers do their work.”

OneStage noted that Door McAllen’s apology on Instagram “does not admit wrongdoing” with respect to the church’s unauthorized stage productions of “Disney’s Beauty & the Beast,” “Despicable Me,” and “Elf: The Musical,” which contained similar anti-LGBTQ+ alterations.  

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Theater

Playwright queers a famous president in ‘Lavender Men’

If you’re one of those hardcore LA theatre aficionados who truly love unique & intimate live productions it’s time to consider diving back

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Roger Q. Mason Alex Esola and Pete Ploszek in 'Lavender Men' (Photo by Jenny Graham)

LOS ANGELES – While you may have noticed that theatre venues like the Ahmanson and the Pantages have made a triumphant return from the COVID shutdowns, LA’s smaller theatre spaces – those who managed to make it through without closing permanently, that is – are still struggling to rebound. If you’re one of those hardcore LA theatre aficionados who truly love the kind of unique and intimate live productions one can only find in our fabulous city, it’s definitely time to consider diving back in – and fortunately, the historic Skylight Theatre has something on its stage right now that should be considered a must-see for any LGBTQ+ theatre fan.

Produced by Playwrights Arena and the Skylight Theatre Company, “Lavender Men” is a brand-new “historical fantasia” which re-imagines one of America’s most beloved historical icons, President Abraham Lincoln, through a queer lens. It’s not the first time Lincoln’s alleged non-heterosexual leanings have been the subject of speculation – or even of speculative dramatization – but this is not merely a historical drama attempting to make a case for the Great Emancipator’s queerness. Directed by Lovell Holder, it instead bridges over a century and a half of history by focusing on an outside observer – Taffeta, a queer and plus-sized person of color who invades Abe Lincoln’s private world to confront issues of visibility, race, and LGBTQ+ inclusion that still challenge us today.

Taffeta, like “Lavender Men” itself, is the brainchild of playwright Roger Q. Mason, who (appropriately enough) plays the character in this premiere production. She’s a figure that represents Mason’s own experience of American culture, springing from their own thinking “about the ways in which people of color, plus size, expansive, are often left out of American romances.”

Roger Q. Mason as Taffeta in ‘Lavender Men’ (Photo by Jenny Graham)

The Blade recently had a chance to chat with Mason about the play, and our conversation is below.

LA Blade: It’s interesting that you chose to address our current vision of the American narrative, particularly regarding queer and non-White European experience, with a play about the Civil War era. Can you explain why you made that choice?

Roger Q. Mason: For me, the Civil War was the time in which our current notions of race, politics, history, and memory were first codified. We are still living in the aftermath of the divides formed during that period. It’s no coincidence that, shortly after the war (in 1868, to be exact), the word “homosexual” first appeared in scientific literature. It is not a coincidence that the backlash of the Emancipation Proclamation (and Juneteenth) was Jim Crow – whose insidious ideas we are unfortunately having to relive in our country today. Therefore, the play HAS to return to the Civil War to disrupt our notions about our cultural and historical narrative and start healing, through calling out the ills that divide rather than unite us.


LAB: Lincoln’s sexuality has long been a point of contentious debate, which is not surprising, considering he is obviously an iconic President – and an iconic Republican, too, although the party of his day was arguably more aligned with values generally attributed Democrats, today. Is that part of the reason you decided to explore it in your play?

RQM: Well, the play was first born from working in the brilliant queer arts community of Chicago. At that time, there was a play going around called “Lincoln was a Faggot,” which pondered the 16th President’s queerness. I was intrigued by the premise. I thought that Lincoln was an American historical god – almost impenetrable and beyond notions of the flesh. So, the possibility of his queerness humanized him in a way. And if I can humanize him, then I can interrogate the world in which he lived and the values which we have inherited from that world. Emerging from a place of humanity, change and growth are possible; healing is possible.  Exploring Lincoln’s queerness became, for me, the first step in healing my own Black, plus-sized queer heart now – a heart which oftentimes feels invisible to my white cisgender queer male counterparts.


LAB: Is that how Taffeta came into the picture?

RQM: Taffeta evolved into the center of “Lavender Men” because of a challenge from Skylight Theatre Company. When we were preparing for the Skylab readings, Producing Co-Artistic Director Gary Grossman posed the question, “Why does Taffeta need to be in the play?” In that early draft, she didn’t have the dominant presence she has now, but I knew she needed to be at the center of the work. She was its heartbeat. So, in many ways, Taffeta’s evolution and growth was a reply to Gary’s question.  


LAB: How did writing “Lavender Men” contribute to your own “evolution and growth?”

RQM: The development history of “Lavender Men” is the story of my own growth as a person and a writer. Growing up, I wanted to be a “man of letters” – with an emphasis on the masculine respectability and the intellectual prowess of that phrase – but what I am is a gender expansive story conjurer! I’ve learned through the process of this play to embrace those beautiful aspects of who I am. 

And I must give credit to Playwrights’ Arena for allowing me the space in which to experience that process. My affiliation with them has been one of admirer and devotee. Jon Lawrence Rivera has championed the works of two very important Los Angeles-based playwrights, Boni Alvarez and Donald Jolly, and they are guiding lights to me as a writer – so when this opportunity to collaborate with Jon and his crew came along, I was excited.  

LAB: What points in the play are most significant to you? What do you hope the audience will take away?

RQM: One of my favorite moments in the play was added in previews. It’s right before the last scene, where Taffeta finally admits the conflicted mission of her voyeurism: she is retelling Abe’s story to identify how his queer white male love excludes her as a black, plus-sized person; and she wants to tell it because it is the closest she’ll ever get to romance in her loveless life. As a writer, that kind of dramaturgical clarity is GOLD. 

I hope that audiences relish in the specific and universal truths that my castmates Pete Ploszek, Alex Esola and I are mining through the show, including the hurt that bias reaps on “the other,” the power of second chances, and the eternal search for self-love. Working with my creative other half Lovell Holder, director on this project, has deepened these themes through embodiment in production. We have all had a lot of fun making the show! So, ultimately, I hope audiences learn something new about themselves and their history, while having a fabulous time along the way.

“Lavender Men” performs at LA’s Skylight Theatre, 1816 1/2 North Vermont Ave (in Los Feliz), through Sept 4. For tickets and more information visit the Skylight’s website.

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“Hadestown” now at LA’s Ahmanson Theater

It’s a retelling of the myth of Orpheus, who in Ancient Greece became renowned for making music so beautiful it moved the stones to weep

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Photo by T. Charles Erickson

LOS ANGELES – By the time “Hadestown” won the Tony for Best Musical, it had already been around for more than 13 years. Conceived, created, and composed by singer/songwriter Anaïs Mitchell in 2006 in what she describes as “a D.I.Y. theater project”, it passed through several iterations (including a concept album and a New York Theatre Workshop production) in a lengthy development process before finally emerging as the Broadway Production that debuted in 2019.

Its story, of course, has been around for much longer. It’s a retelling of the myth of Orpheus, who in Ancient Greece became renowned for making music so beautiful it moved the stones to weep; when his beloved wife Eurydice was bitten by vipers and died, he descended into the underworld and used his musical gifts to persuade Hades himself to let her return with him to the world of the living – though with a condition attached to make the hero’s triumph less a victory than a Devil’s bargain, as anyone who knows this familiar tale will surely remember.

And it IS a familiar tale, one which spawned an entire religion in the Ancient Mediterranean world and has gone on to inspire countless artists – for reasons which are perhaps obvious, it’s a story with particular significance to artists, of all kinds – to express it through works of their own over all the centuries since. Why, then, does it need to be told again?

“Hadestown,” now arrived at LA’s Ahmanson Theater, endeavors to answer that question – but it also stands, in all its infectious and transfigurative excellence, as answer enough in itself.

Reimagining the story from its classical origins into something more resembling a rustic American folk tale, Mitchell’s musical transplants it into a New Orleans-esque setting somewhere on the Road to Hell, where Hermes may still be messenger of the gods, but is here a master-of-ceremonies, too.

It’s a place where the times are definitely hard, but Hermes’ ward Orpheus claims to be writing a song to set the world right again. Eurydice is a hungry drifter who falls for the youthful bard even though he’s clearly a simple-minded dreamer with nothing to offer her but his love; the Underworld is a factory, where workers labor eternally under the promise of freedom which never comes, and Hades is its powerful owner; his wife Persephone (per agreement) lives half the year with him down below and counts the hours until she’s free to live the other half having fun and spreading sunshine in the world above.

With the principal characters recast in this way, the show is free to weave their tale through a rich and imaginative blues-and-jazz infused musical score and the simple-but-ingenious theatrical trickery of its scenic design – and the result is two-and-a-half hours of high-spirited, irresistible enjoyment that’s guaranteed to deliver a deeply satisfying emotional catharsis but never once feels like just another version of a stodgy old myth.

There is not much a review can convey about the experience of “Hadestown” that comes close to capturing it. The best one can do is say you will certainly laugh, probably cry, and unquestionably be humming the songs for weeks to come. Beyond that, we can only encourage our readers – enthusiastically –to go and see it, and assure them it will be a rollicking, rousing good time. It is, and we do.

That said, there are a lot of things about it to appreciate – the sense of magic that pervades the entire show, for instance, bringing us into a realm where reality and metaphor blend, and the literal and the poetic become one and the same.

In this “world of gods and men”, summer can be both a season of the year and a feeling of being in love, Hell can be a dead-end job or a troubled marriage, and a wealthy industrialist with Fascist leanings can be the Devil himself. Reading those statements alone is enough to recognize the truth of them; living them through “Hadestown” is enough to stamp that truth indelibly into your memory.

A great deal of the magic that makes that happen comes from the show’s score, performed with relish by an onstage show band that is as much of a character as any of the other people on stage. It disarms us with its feel-good sound, a classic blend of elements from gospel to Dixieland to zydeco, and artfully deploys harmonics and melody with scientific precision to transport us into the esoteric mindset where all myths take place.

In other words, the power of “Hadestown” comes from its music – which, perhaps not coincidentally, is about as true to the spirit of Orpheus himself as you can get.

That spirit clearly inhabits the show’s cast, as well. Tony-winner (for “Million Dollar Quartet”) Levi Kreis steps into the unenviable task of filling the shoes of the regal Andre De Shields – Broadway’s Hermes – and makes the role his own, bringing a crooner’s voice and a “good-time Charlie” flair that lend a poignant edge to the hard-won wisdom it is his assignation to dispense.

As Orpheus, youthful Nicholas Barasch endears himself with a comedic red-headed “mooncalf” persona, while contrasting it with a voice that sounds as if it really was a gift from the gods; Morgan Siobhan Green’s Eurydice is a perfect yin to his yang, as grounded in practical reality as he is adrift in the clouds of his imagination and his art, but with a soulful voice of her own.

Keyvn Morrow brings imposing presence, a powerful deep bass voice, and just enough empathy to Hades, while Kimberly Marable’s Persephone, equally compelling as sun-drenched summer goddess and day-drinking neglected wife, is the natural center of attention whenever she appears onstage.

Capping the main ensemble off are Belén Moyano, Bex Odorisio, and Shea Renne as The Fates, who taunt the characters – and the audience – throughout with tight harmonies and choreography that practically stop the show every time they take the spotlight. And as praiseworthy as all the leading players are, their talents are matched by the entire ensemble.

Add an ever-metamorphosizing scenic design by Rachel Hauck and electrifying choreography by David Neumann, and “Hadestown” becomes an unforgettable trip to the Underworld and back that will leave you wanting more for a long time to come. And if all that is not enough to convince you that it’s the biggest must-see musical of the year so far, then just remember what we said about words not being able to capture the experience – and go to see it anyway.

“Hadestown” continues through May 29 at the Ahmanson, but if you can’t make it by then you can catch the same production when it takes the stage at the Segerstrom Center for the Arts in Costa Mesa from August 9 to 21.

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Theater

Barrier-breaking lesbian does a ‘Death-Defying Escape’ in her new play

Carter was the first woman to ever play the Close-Up Gallery at the Magic Castle, LA’s famed club frequented by celebrity magic lovers

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Judy Carter (Photo by Jenny Graham)

HOLLYWOOD – Quick, name a famous female magician. Don’t worry, we already know you probably can’t – not even if you use Google. That’s because, as Judy Carter puts it, “There aren’t any. They’re all men. The idea that a woman can manipulate reality is really terrifying – I mean, we used to get burned at the stake for it, right?”

Judy herself, however, is proof that her statement is not entirely true. Though hardly a household name (not in most households, anyway), she broke gender barriers by performing magic on TV on the likes of The Merv Griffin Show” and “The Mike Douglas Show,” before an impromptu performance necessitated by missing equipment launched her into a second career as a stand-up comedian, public speaker, and author (“I wrote the BOOK on being gay!”, she jokes, in reference to her Lambda Literary Award-winning humor book, “The Homo Handbook”). She’s since appeared on over 100 TV shows and four comedy cable specials, as well as opening for Prince and playing in Las Vegas.

Now she’s playing the Hudson Guild Theatre in Hollywood, with her play “A Death-Defying Escape.” Presented by Comedy Workshop Productions, it’s described as “a darkly funny, inspiring new comedy about one woman’s miraculous escape from the secrets of her past.” In it, Carter weaves together stories from her life with “jaw-dropping, audience-interactive on-stage magic”, and takes audiences through a unique narrative that features something for everyone: Jewish humor, lesbian romance, a disability awareness — and world-class, never-before-seen illusions designed by Vegas pro Craig Dickens.

“He did it because he loved the script so much,” Carter tells us.

Speaking with the Blade during a break from the rigors of last-minute rehearsals, the verteran performer shared some of the experiences – not all of them wonderful – that culminated in her decision to tell her life story in a play, starting with a not-so-obvious explanation about the connection she feels between magic and being a lesbian.

“I think there’s a big correlation between us gays and magicians,” she told us. “Especially those of us who came out in the eighties – and that’s keeping secrets. 

This play is about revealing secrets. We had so of them many growing up in the Fairfax district of LA – we weren’t the fancy Beverly Hills Jews, you know, we were the low-end Jews who still had our original noses. My older sister was disabled, and she was given away to an institution, that was a secret. And then I turned out to be gay, and that was a secret. And then guess what? Grandma’s having electro-shock treatment, and that was another secret!”

During those early years, Carter found refuge and release in comedy, overcoming a speech impediment so she could do funny magic shows for birthday parties. She even ended up being written up for it in the Los Angeles Times, launching her on a career that would ultimately take her across barriers no woman had passed before – though it wasn’t always an easy passage.

“I was the first woman to ever play the Close-Up Gallery, in the card room at the Magic Castle,” she remembers, meaning Los Angeles’ famed private club frequented by celebrity magic lovers ranging from Orson Welles to Neil Patrick Harris since its founding in 1963.

“Anyway, what happened was, I was physically picked up by this real ‘macho’ magician, and he threw me over his shoulder, and carried me out of the Castle, and he threw me down into the parking lot. And he said to me, ‘Women don’t belong here, honey, stick to bunnies and rabbits, cards are for men.’ And I thought, ‘Why? Because they’re so heavy?’

And so, in my play, I have that scene, and I think it will open up some things… I think it will really resonate.”

Still, her show is not just dedicated to the professional hurdles that she had to leap.

“I wrote this play because it also surrounds something that happened to me later in life, and that is that I fell deeply in love,” she explains. “It was almost like the first time. I was married to another woman for sixteen years, and we got divorced, and even though I had given up on finding love – I mean, I know getting older is not big turn on for a lot of people – suddenly I was falling in love with a woman that was considerably younger than me. Forty years younger! And it blew my mind.”

While the new love in her life might not seem related to the stories of her earlier trials, it’s more than just a convenient “happy ending” – there’s a point to be made.

“No matter what trauma has happened to us in our past, love is possible,” Carter says. “Escape is possible. It’s possible to leave behind these things that have happened to us and make ourselves vulnerable to love.”

As for the magic, she won’t reveal too much.

“I can’t give any spoilers, but I will tell you that I do a death-defying escape from heterosexuality, right in front of people’s eyes! It’s going to be amazing!”
Directed by Lee Costello,A Death-Defying Escape!” features Carter alongside actors Kevin Scott Allen and Lyndsi LaRose, and will “disappear weekly” at the Hudson Guild Theatre Saturdays and Sundays from April 2 through May 8. In addition, the production will be made available to streaming audiences worldwide beginning on April 9 – so even if you’re reading this from outside of Los Angeles, you’ll still get a chance to experience it.

Tickets to both are available via www.deathdefyingescape.com.

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