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Gay-organized Trump rally draws just 18 attendees

‘Make America Great Again’ event held near White House

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Make America Great Again, gay news, Washington Blade

Just 18 people turned out for a weekend pro-Trump event. (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)

A total of just 18 people turned out on Saturday, July 1, for a Make America Great Again Free Speech Rally on the Ellipse section of the National Mall near the White House that was organized by Gays for Trump President Peter Boykin.

Boykin and several others who spoke at the rally said they were certain that each of those attending the event represents thousands of others, both gay and straight, who are conservative, loyal Americans that deeply believe Donald Trump will provide the leadership needed to get the nation back on track.

“Make American Great Again is not just a political slogan,” Boykin told the gathering. ”It’s an American one which has been shared by many great people in this nation no matter what their race, gender or sexual orientation.”

Boykin and others who helped organize the event promoted it as a nonpartisan rally for free speech but made it known that most of those expected to speak would be Trump supporters, although others would be welcome to speak. As it turned out, only Trump supporters spoke at the event.

Ronald Reagan first coined the phrase Make America Great Again during his 1980 campaign for president, Boykin pointed out. He noted that Bill Clinton also used the Make American Great Again slogan in his 1992 presidential campaign.

“It makes me proud when I hear those words and to live by that code and to not only attempt to MAGA for me but to MAGA for everyone,” Boykin said. “For if we truly Make America Great Again then we can bless the world in MAGA, which is to make the earth great again.”

With temperatures soaring into the upper 90s, Boykin and some helpers set up a small stage with four loud speakers in front of a small tent decorated with American flags and two rainbow flags. With the White House and the national Christmas tree as a backdrop, the rally took place on a mostly empty Ellipse, which is large oval field with grass but no trees.

Boykin and at least one other speaker gave several reasons for the small turnout.

“It’s not that people didn’t want to come out,” Boykin said. “A lot of people said they would love to but they just couldn’t afford it. It’s the Fourth of July weekend and a lot of people also spend time with their families,” he said.

He also speculated that Washington, D.C. has become a place “where a lot of people don’t want to spend time,” partially because “there is a lot of bickering, a lot of in-fighting going on, not only the Democrats, the liberals, … but also among the Republicans.”

Don Lime, who identified himself as a radio talk show host from Monterey Bay, Calif., who recently moved to D.C., said he believes the low turnout was due, in part, because conservative activists – he being among them – are pleased with the job Trump is doing as president.

“I’ll shoot you straight. We don’t have a lot of people here. But I’ll tell you why,” he told the gathering from the stage. “It’s because when you’re ahead and when you’re winning you can stop everything. You just quit fighting because you’re winning every day. Every day has just been a win here, a win there, a win everywhere,” he said in referring to Trump’s accomplishments so far.

Lime, who is black, said he has been criticized since moving to D.C. by the political establishment who he said sometimes can’t comprehend why a black person could support Trump.

“I decided to become a conservative once I found out the truth that the media was tricking us and the Democrats had control for 30 to 40 years,” he said. “As a black person I realized I was being hoodwinked. What I mean is they thought that welfare is a good thing – absolutely not,” he said.

“They wanted black people sometimes, not all, but a lot of black people, they just want us to sit around and get benefits and give them votes,” he told the rally. “So I decided to give them a vote. I gave them a vote for Trump, a great leader.”

Lisa Christiansen, whose resume describes her as a motivational speaker, writer, author, and creator of two charitable foundations, delivered a 50-minute keynote speech at the rally describing, among other things, how she came to believe Donald Trump would be and is becoming a highly successful president.

She told of her upbringing and early childhood in Tahlequah, Okla., the capital of the Cherokee Nation, where she was born and where she did not learn to speak English until she was 10 years old.

Years later, she told of her first meeting with Donald Trump in 2009 during a group visit to Trump Tower, the New York City residence and offices used by the Trump family before Donald Trump won election as president.

She said she was “so impressed” with Trump as a businessman at the time of her meeting with him that when she learned six years later than he planned to run for president she immediately understood he would be best suited to lead the nation at that time.

Others speaking at the rally included Los Angeles conservative activist and former Air Force officer Jack Cummins, who called it a “true blessing” that Trump has become president. Cummins criticized Democrats for calling on the U.S. to advance democracy throughout the world.

He said the U.S. was not founded on democracy but was founded instead as a “constitutional republic.”

“Don’t say we need to advance democracy,” he said. “Say we need to advance liberty.”

In concluding remarks as the rally drew to a close, Boykin – amid cheers from the attendees – said he was tired of being told that only Democrats support LGBT rights.

“I’m proud to be a gay conservative for Trump,” he said. “I am not against LGBT. I am not against transgender.”

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California Politics

It’s official- Rep. Karen Bass enters race to become the next mayor of LA

If elected she would be the first Black woman & second Black mayor after legendary Tom Bradley who served as 38th Mayor from 1973 to 1993

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Rep. Karen Bass (D-37CA) (Photo Credit: Bass campaign provided0

LOS ANGELES – Congresswoman Karen Bass officially announced her entrance Monday as a candidate to replace her fellow Democrat outgoing Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti.

“Our city is facing a public health, safety and economic crisis in homelessness that has evolved into a humanitarian emergency,” she said in a statement announcing her candidacy. “Los Angeles is my home. With my whole heart, I’m ready. Let’s do this — together.”

If Bass were to win election she would be the first Black woman mayor and the second Black mayor after Thomas Bradley, the legendary politician and former police officer who served as the 38th Mayor of Los Angeles from 1973 to 1993.

KABC 7 noted that she would be the first sitting House member to be elected mayor of Los Angeles since 1953, when Rep. Norris Poulson was elected. Then-Reps. James Roosevelt, Alphonzo Bell and Xavier Becerra lost campaigns for mayor in 1965, 1969 and 2001.

The 67-year-old member of Congress currently represents the 37th Congressional District, which encompasses Los Angeles neighborhoods west and southwest of downtown including Crenshaw, Baldwin Hills, Miracle Mile, Pico-Robertson, Century City, Cheviot Hills, West Los Angeles, Mar Vista and parts of Westwood, as well as Culver City and Inglewood. Bass was a member of the California Assembly from 2004-10, serving as that body’s speaker from 2008 to 2010.

Bass is entering an already crowded field of candidates including Los Angeles City Attorney Mike Feuer and two members of the City Council – Kevin de León and Joe Buscaino – who have already announced their campaigns for mayor.

When speculation as to her running surfaced last week, Bass spokesman Zach Seidl told the Los Angeles Times that her running was due to the fact that “Los Angeles is facing a humanitarian crisis in homelessness and a public health crisis in the disproportionate impact this pandemic has had on Angelenos,” Seidl said in a statement. “She does not want to see these two issues tear the city apart. Los Angeles has to come together. That’s why the Congresswoman is considering a run for mayor,” he added.

That seems to be the focal point and whoever is elected will face the city’s massive homelessness crisis.

Bass acknowledged this in her candidacy announcement statement this morning, writing “I’ve spent my entire life bringing groups of people together in coalitions to solve complex problems and produce concrete change — especially in times of crisis.”

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California Politics

Rep. Karen Bass to enter Los Angeles mayoral race

Bass has been working to dismantle systemic racism, as well as other forms of social, racial and economic injustice, for decades

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Rep. Karen Bass, (D-37) (Photo Credit: Blade file photo by Karen Ocamb)

LOS ANGELES – In a breaking story published Friday morning, the Los Angeles Times reported that Democratic Congresswoman Karen Bass, who represents California’s 37th congressional district, which covers several areas south and west of downtown LA will enter the mayor’s race.

U.S. Rep Karen Bass (D-Los Angeles) intends to run for Los Angeles mayor, according to three people familiar with her plans. Such a move would shake up a contest that, until this past week, which saw the field of candidates increase, had been a fairly sleepy affair. Bass, a high-profile Democrat who has served in both Sacramento and Washington, D.C., could announce her entry into the mayor’s race as early as next week, those sources told The Times.

Bass has been working to dismantle systemic racism, as well as other forms of social, racial and economic injustice, for decades. She is a community activist who was raised on civil rights activism in LA’s Jewish Venice-Fairfax district, volunteered for Bobby Kennedy’s presidential campaign in middle school, graduated from Hamilton High School in West LA in 1971, studied philosophy at San Diego University but switched her attention to healthcare, graduating from USC’s Keck School of Medicine Physician Assistant Program. She subsequently received her BA in health sciences from Cal State/Dominguez Hills and her Masters in Social Work from USC.

Bass focused that training on fighting the crack epidemic in South LA, where she founded the Community Coalition to fight for substance abuse prevention programs and better foster care and relative caregivers, like grandmothers.

She also fought the AIDS epidemic — all experience directly applicable to dealing with the ongoing Opioid crisis, as well as COVID-19.

“I went through the AIDS crisis from its very beginning. I watched all of Santa Monica Boulevard get wiped out near Vermont (Ave.). That whole area there. I watched everybody die within a matter of two years,” Bass told the Los Angeles Blade. “But I think that this [COVID-19 crisis] is really hard because you don’t have to have any physical contact….People are building the plane while it’s flying.”

Torie Osborn, the executive director of the Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian Community Services Center in 1989, met Bass at a meeting of progressive grassroots activists in a South LA church basement.

“This woman I didn’t know came up, introduced herself as Karen Bass from South LA, an anti-police violence activist and a physician assistant,” Osborn says. The two talked all day with Bass noting that the gay community’s experience of AIDS deaths was similar to what the Black community was experiencing during the crack epidemic.

“I had never heard anything like this before. She knew gay men. She clearly was an ally,” Osborn says.

Last summer the Biden campaign vetted Bass as a potential candidate for the number two spot on the Democratic ticket in the race for the White House, which ultimately ended up with then California U.S. Senator Kamala Harris as Biden’s choice.

“Los Angeles is facing a humanitarian crisis in homelessness and a public health crisis in the disproportionate impact this pandemic has had on Angelenos,” Bass spokesman Zach Seidl said in a statement, when asked for comment by the Times. “She does not want to see these two issues tear the city apart. Los Angeles has to come together. That’s why the Congresswoman is considering a run for mayor.”

Earlier this past week, another LGBTQ ally, Los Angeles City Councilman Kevin de León, a Democrat, announced his intention to seek the mayor’s chair after current Mayor Eric Garcetti, who was elected for a four-year term in 2013 and again in 2017- who’s limited to serving no more than two terms- was picked by President Joe Biden to serve as the U.S. ambassador to India on July 9, 2021.

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Politics

Head of Anti-LGBTQ group worked with Trump to overturn election

Eastman and the former president had a secret scheme to try to get former Vice-President Mike Pence to overturn election

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NOM Head John Eastman with Rudy Giuliani on January 6, 2021 (Screenshot via YouTube)

By David Badash | PROVINCETOWN, Ma. – The head of a once well-known anti-LGBTQ organization that spent countless millions in dark money to try to block the advancement of same-sex marriage worked with then-President Donald Trump and his legal team on a secret scheme to try to get Vice President Mike Pence to subvert the U.S. Constitution and overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election.

John Eastman, who until January 13 was a tenured professor of law and dean at the Chapman University School of Law in California, advanced a six-point plan detailing the steps he wanted Pence to take on January 6.

Eastman, who is the chairman of NOM, the National Organization For Marriage, “tried to convince then-Vice President Mike Pence that he could overturn the election results on January 6 when Congress counted the Electoral College votes by throwing out electors from seven states, according to the new book ‘Peril’ from Washington Post journalists Bob Woodward and Robert Costa,” CNN reports.

“You really need to listen to John. He’s a respected constitutional scholar. Hear him out,” Trump told Pence during a January 4 meeting with Eastman in the Oval Office, according to “Peril.”

In addition to directing that Pence would falsely claim that the seven states had competing electors, Eastman suggested Pence make all these moves without warning.

“The main thing here is that Pence should do this without asking for permission — either from a vote of the joint session or from the Court,” Eastman wrote. “The fact is that the Constitution assigns this power to the Vice President as the ultimate arbiter. We should take all of our actions with that in mind.”

Pence disagreed with Eastman’s legal claims and did not enact the secret scheme.

Eastman spoke at the January 6 “Save America” rally that many claim Trump used to incite the insurrection.

One week later he “abruptly” resigned from Chapman University “amid criticism of his role in stoking the violent attack,” and “calls for his firing,” Law.com reported at the time.

********************

David Badash (@davidbadash) is the founder and editor of The New Civil Rights Movement, an award-winning news & opinion site.

The preceding article was first published by The New Civil Rights Movement and is republished by permission.

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