November 16, 2018 at 7:53 am PST | by Karen Ocamb
Brush fire in Hollywood Hills off Laurel Canyon contained

Firefighters raced to douse a brush fire in the Hollywood Hills just above Sunset Blvd in Laurel Canyon early Friday morning—the area made famous by such 1960s singers as Joni Mitchell. The streets are narrow, making it difficult for fire trucks to reach the outbreak. But the Santa Ana winds that have driven so many of the other fires this past week were not a factor and between water-dropping helicopters and aggressive LA County firefighters, the brush fire was contained around 7:30AM.

Fear of the brush fire spreading initially had Mt. Olympus/West Hollywood residents holding their breath, a natural reaction as the state watched in horror as so many other areas quickly fell to fire this past week. The death toll in California’s most devastating wildfires in history climbed to 63 on Thursday, while the number of missing is now 631, authorities told the Los Angles Times.  Donald Trump is expected to tour some of the burned out areas on Saturday.

The Camp Fire in Butte County in Northern California burned 141,000 acres and is 40 percent contained. The Woolsey Fire in Los Angeles, Malibu burned 93,682 acres, and is 62 percent contained. Mandatory evacuations were lifted in some areas of Agoura Hills, Calabasas and West Lake, and all of Hidden Hills yesterday

“This fire is going to have a profound impact on many people’s lives and we are doing everything in our power to jumpstart the recovery effort and ease the hardship in any way we can. In addition to the heroic efforts of first responders, many County Departments have been involved in important, but less high-profile work during the crisis to ensure people’s safety and help us begin planning our recovery efforts,” out LA County Supervisor Sheila Kuehl wrote in an email to her Third District constituents impacted by the SoCal fires. “Our hearts go out to the hundreds of thousands of County residents, including County employees, who have been directly, and in many cases, devastatingly affected by this tragedy. “Please keep checking www.lacounty.gov/woolseyfire and 211la.org/fire for accurate, up-to-date information on the Woolsey Fire.”

© Copyright Los Angeles Blade, LLC. 2018. All rights reserved.