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Lawsuit filed to block Trump Administration’s ‘Denial of Care’ rule

Trump sought to permit doctors to deny care based on personal religious or moral beliefs

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A lawsuit filed Tuesday in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California is challenging the “Denial of Care” Rule issued earlier this month by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

The plaintiffs, which includes the Los Angeles LGBT Center, claim the policy, published Tuesday May 21, is unconstitutional and exceeds HHS’s statutory authority.

The new regulation allows health care workers – doctors, nurses, EMTs, administrators and clerical staff – to deny medical treatment and services to patients because of personal religious or moral beliefs.

Health care facilities that do not comply risk losing federal funding.

According to a press release issued by Americans United for Separation of Church and State, Center for Reproductive Rights, and Lambda Legal, “The regulation will cause mass confusion among health care providers and is completely infeasible to implement. As a result, health care facilities may do away with reproductive and LGBTQ services altogether, leaving millions without access to critical health care.”

“The rule applies to all healthcare facilities that receive federal funding through HHS, which includes most hospitals. Threatened with the loss of all federal funding and facing confusing and unworkable requirements, many health care facilities will face strong incentives to do away with critical health care services for women and the LGBTQ community.”

“The rule could also lead to many LGBTQ patients not fully disclosing their identity and medical history for fear of discrimination, resulting in improper or incomplete care. While marginalized communities are the intended target, the rule is so broad that the religious objections of a health care worker could result in anyone – the elderly, children, and those in critical condition – being denied lifesaving medical care.”

Lambda Legal Senior Attorney Jamie Gliksberg.

“The breadth of the harm this new rule will cause is impossible to exaggerate, and opens up yet another front in the Trump Administration’s assault on civil rights of minorities and already marginalized, vulnerable populations,” Lambda Legal Senior Attorney Jamie Gliksberg said.

“This almost limitless invitation to discriminate will inevitably result in women, LGBT people and religious minorities facing hostile health care workers and denials of medical care at moments of greatest need, where any delay could be fatal,” she also stated.

In the summary of the lawsuit attorneys for the plaintiffs noted;

“The rule “impermissibly favors, prefers, and endorses certain religious beliefs and certain religious denominations over others,” the groups wrote in a summary of the lawsuit:.

The policy “violates patients’ rights to privacy, liberty, dignity, and autonomy” by imposing conditions that unduly burden patients’ access to medically necessary health care and “chills constitutionally protected First Amendment activity, such as a patient’s ability to disclose or express their sexual orientation,” they added.

Plaintiffs include California’s Santa Clara County, the Los Angeles LGBT Center and the D.C.-based Whitman-Walker Health.

This story has been corrected to indicate that Americans United is not a plaintiff in the lawsuit. 

Health

White House ‘walking the walk’ on LGBTQ public health

David Lauterstein, co-founder of the popular clothing brand Nasty Pig with husband, Frederick Kearne received an invitation to the White House

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From left, Harold Phillips, Nasty Pig founders Frederick Kearne and David Lauterstein, White House National Mpox Response Deputy Coordinator Demetre Daskalakis. (Photo courtesy of Nasty Pig)

WASHINGTON – David Lauterstein, co-founder of the popular clothing brand Nasty Pig with his husband, Frederick Kearne, spoke with the Washington Blade by phone on Thursday about his company’s work with the Biden administration on public health initiatives targeting the LGBTQ community.

The Nasty Pig team received an invitation to the White House on Jan. 12, ahead of the company’s planned participation in Mid Atlantic Leather, the fetish event held annually in D.C. over Martin Luther King Jr. weekend.

After meeting with officials, including White House National Mpox Response Deputy Coordinator Demetre Daskalakis and Harold Phillips, policy director of the White House Office of National AIDS Policy, Lauterstein and Kearne decided to scrap their Nasty Pig booth at MAL in favor of administering a popup mpox and sexual health clinic in partnership with federal and D.C. public health teams.

During those conversations at the White House, “We found out that there was a big need for second shots,” Lauterstein told the Blade on Thursday.

“We learned we have queer siblings in smaller towns and cities where asking for a vaccine is outing yourself — there are queer people who have to put their health at risk because they can’t go to Walgreens and ask for an mpox vaccine,” he said.

Lauterstein told himself, “I don’t give a fuck if we help [just] one person” with the popup clinic, which turned out to be a resounding success. “After day one, the D.C. Department of Health had to call for backup” to meet the demand, Lauterstein said.

From the time he founded Nasty Pig in 1994 amid the AIDS crisis, “we wanted to be a voice of sexual positivity at a time when our community had adopted so much of the stigma placed unfairly upon us, when back then the prevailing wisdom was to blend in and be heteronormative because we were seen as the spreaders of death,” Lauterstein said.

At the White House, a visit that was “one of the most humbling and profound experiences of my life,” Lauterstein said he was stuck by the diversity of the teams working on behalf of the mpox response and other public health initiatives.

“Talk about ‘walking the walk,'” he said.

The administration’s decision to partner with Nasty Pig and hire health officials like Daskalakis who have experience administering programs that are tailored to the needs of LGBTQ people and grounded in, for example, a realistic and judgment-free understanding of the sexual behaviors of gay and bisexual men, is revelatory, Lauterstein said.

“It’s such an evolution of public health and the magnitude of it isn’t lost on me due to our history,” he said, adding that “if we could have had these conversations in 1981 [as the AIDS crisis emerged], the amount of suffering and pain that could have been spared our community would have been tremendous.”

“The fact that we have an administration that understands we don’t need to be lectured to but rather spoken with about how we solve these problems together is a huge shift,” Lauterstein said [emphasis added.]

Lauterstein and Daskalakis developed a friendship during the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, during which time Daskalakis was a decorated public health official in New York.

They discussed the unmet need for recommendations tailored to the LGBTQ community, and Daskalakis’s guidelines for how to have safe sex during the pandemic reached a broad audience thanks to Lauterstein’s network of devoted Nasty Pig fans and large social media following.

“I recognized the power of our relationship when [Daskalakis] was promoted to the [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention] and then quickly snapped up by the White House to lead the mpox coordinated response,” Lauterstein said. “They couldn’t have asked for a better guy.”

Following months of aggressive public outreach and vaccination campaigns coordinated by the federal government with state, local and community partners, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services allowed the mpox public health emergency to expire on Tuesday.

Nasty Pig founders David Lauterstein and Frederick Kearney stand outside of the White House. (Photo courtesy of Nasty Pig)
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Fentanyl Crisis

Calif. bill to strengthen penalties for Fentanyl trafficking introduced

AB 367 will be heard in policy committees later this spring and will move on to the Assembly floor this summer

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California Capitol (Photo Credit: Office of the Governor)

SACRAMENTO – Assemblymember Brian Maienschein introduced legislation this week to help California take action to stop drug traffickers from contributing to the fentanyl epidemic.

Fentanyl overdoses have spiked across the nation in recent years. In California, over 5,700 fentanyl-related deaths were reported in 2021 alone. According to the California Department of Public Health, fentanyl is up to 50 times stronger than heroin and 100 times stronger than morphine. An alarming increase in counterfeit pills and other illicit substances being sold on the drug trafficking market have been laced with a fatal amount of fentanyl, leading to thousands of deaths and serious injuries.

Assembly Bill 367 will provide stronger criminal penalties for individuals who sell or otherwise furnish controlled substances, such as fentanyl, that result in great bodily injury or death.

“Fentanyl has had devastating effects in San Diego County and throughout the state, and the data shows us that action to address this epidemic is critically overdue,” said Assemblymember Maienschein. “My bill would help California hold drug dealers accountable for the destruction and trauma they cause by knowingly distributing this deadly substance.”

Last year, San Diego Mayor Todd Gloria signed an executive order calling for bold action by state and federal lawmakers to help the region and the state address the fentanyl emergency. Assemblymember Maienschein has partnered with Mayor Gloria on AB 367 to take the necessary steps to address this crisis in San Diego County and throughout California.

“The nationwide proliferation of illicitly manufactured fentanyl is a deadly crisis that claimed more than 800 lives in San Diego County in 2021 alone – and the death toll continues to climb,” said San Diego Mayor Todd Gloria. “We need action at every level of government, and Assemblymember Brian Maienschein is stepping up with bold legislation that I’m proud to sponsor. AB 367 will crack down on predatory dealers of a dangerous poison that’s complicating our efforts to address homelessness and fueling a crisis of addiction, mental illness, and overdose across our region and the nation.”

AB 367 is also supported by San Diego County District Attorney Summer Stephan who has championed fentanyl overdose awareness and action throughout the region, as well as the San Diego Police Department.

“This bill gives a measure of dignity to the suffering of the thousands who were inflicted with great bodily injury or death due to drug dealers selling fentanyl,” said San Diego County District Attorney Summer Stephan. “This proposed law allows our prosecutors to hold those who are causing this devastation accountable for their actions. Current state law treats a seller of drugs who does not result in injury the same as a fentanyl seller that results in the person becoming paralyzed or dying and that is not justice. I fully support this bill and thank Assemblymember Maienschein for helping us fight to save lives.”

“Law enforcement needs help from the legislature in updating our laws to meet the needs of our communities,” said San Diego Police Chief David Nisleit. “We must ensure that when crimes are being committed, including the predatory actions of fentanyl dealers who have little regard for whether their actions lead to loss of life, there are real consequences so we can stem the tide of rising drug-induced deaths. Combatting the drug overdose crisis from all levels is what it will take to save lives. Thank you to Assemblymember Brian Maienschein for enhancing our ability to hold criminals accountable with AB 367.”

AB 367 will be heard in policy committees later this spring and will move on to the Assembly floor this summer.

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LGBTQ+ Youth Mental Health

Body dissatisfaction linked with suicide risk for LGBTQ+ youth

LGBTQ youth with body dissatisfaction reported higher rates of depression symptoms, anxiety symptoms, self-harming behaviors

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LGBTQ youth (Hlliburton Foundation graphic)

WEST HOLLYWOOD – Based on a Trevor Project survey of nearly 34,000 LGBTQ youth across the U.S., findings show that an overwhelming majority report being dissatisfied with their bodies – and rates are even higher among transgender and nonbinary youth.

The brief also found that LGBTQ youth who reported body dissatisfaction had significantly higher odds of reporting a suicide attempt in the past year.

Key Findings:

  • Nearly nine in ten (87%) LGBTQ youth reported being dissatisfied with their body. 
  • Rates of body dissatisfaction were higher among transgender and nonbinary youth (90%) compared to cisgender youth (80%).
  • LGBTQ youth with body dissatisfaction reported higher rates of depression symptoms, anxiety symptoms, self-harming behaviors, and considering suicide compared to LGBTQ youth with body satisfaction.
  • LGBTQ youth with body dissatisfaction had twice the odds of reporting a suicide attempt in the past year compared to LGBTQ youth with body satisfaction. 

“These findings underscore that an overwhelming majority of LGBTQ youth struggle with body dissatisfaction, something that can severely impact their mental health and contribute to higher odds of attempting suicide,” said Dr. Myeshia Price, Director of Research Science at The Trevor Project.

“As LGBTQ youth across the U.S. consume media and messages related to health and physical fitness – especially during this time of year, in relation to new year’s resolutions – we must do a better job of centering body acceptance and healthy lifestyles rather than encouraging young people to achieve a certain physical appearance. We encourage all youth-serving professionals, including educators, physicians, and health care providers, to discuss how body image may be impacting the LGBTQ youth they support.”

Read the Trevor Project’s latest research brief, LGBTQ Youth and Body Dissatisfaction:

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AIDS and HIV

President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief marks year 20

Achievements PEPFAR have been remarkable, well-documented by outside evaluators, and hugely applauded throughout the advocacy community

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President George W. Bush signing PEPFAR’s authorizing legislation January 28, 2003. (Photo Credit: George W. Bush Presidential Center)

WASHINGTON – The President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) marks its twenty year anniversary today, marking the largest commitment by any nation to address a single disease in the world.

The initiative which was personally led and launched by former President George W. Bush in 2003,  its funding has totaled more than $110 billion to date, including funding for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund), to which the U.S. government is the largest donor.

PEPFAR is credited with saving millions of lives and helping to change the trajectory of the global HIV epidemic.  The White House today released a statement by President Joe Biden marking the 20th Anniversary:

Twenty years ago today, President George W. Bush declared that preventing and treating HIV/AIDS was a foreign policy priority of the United States. At a time when nearly 30 million people were HIV positive, but very few were receiving life-saving medicines, the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) transformed the global AIDS response and laid a marker for America’s commitment to countries that were impacted the hardest by the AIDS epidemic. Helping lead the bipartisan effort in Congress to authorize PEPFAR is among my proudest achievements from my time in the Senate. To this day, PEPFAR remains a powerful example of America’s unmatched ability to drive progress and make life better for people around the world.
 
Since 2003, PEPFAR has saved more than 25 million lives and dramatically improved health outcomes in more than 55 partner countries. AIDS-related deaths have declined by 68 percent since their peak in 2004, and new HIV infections are down 42 percent. PEPFAR investments have ensured that 5.5 million babies have been born HIV-free. And two decades of investment in partner nations’ health systems played a critical role in countries’ ability to respond to other health crises such as COVID-19, Mpox, and Ebola.    
 
Today, PEPFAR continues to support 20.1 million people around the world with HIV/AIDS treatment, and my Administration is committed to continuing to lead the global HIV/AIDS response. We will build on our decades of progress to reach the Sustainable Development Goal of ending AIDS by 2030, work to eliminate the stigma and inequities that keep people from accessing care, and keep the voices of people living with HIV/AIDS at the center of our response.  I look forward to working with Congress on PEPFAR’s reauthorization this year.

PEPFAR is overseen by the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator, who is appointed by the President, confirmed by the Senate, and reports directly to the Secretary of State, as established through PEPFAR’s authorizing legislation.

PEPFAR’s original authorization established new structures and authorities, consolidating all U.S. bilateral and multilateral activities and funding for global HIV/AIDS. Several U.S. agencies, host country governments, and other organizations are involved in implementation.

Dr. John Nkengasong, the current coordinator was sworn in on June 13, 2022, and holds the rank of Ambassador leading the Office of the Global AIDS Coordinator (OGAC) at the U.S. Department of State.

Nobel Prize winning scientist Harold Varmus, who served as Director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) from 1993 to 1999 and currently the Lewis Thomas University Professor of Medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York City, wrote in an article honoring World Aids Day 2013:

[…] “the PEPFAR story must begin with George W. Bush and his wife, Laura, and their interests in AIDS, Africa, and what Bush termed “compassionate conservatism.” According to his 2010 memoir, Decision Points, the two of them developed a serious interest in improving the fate of the people of Africa after reading Alex Haley’s Roots and visiting The Gambia in 1990.3 In 1998, while pondering a run for the U.S. presidency, he discussed Africa with Condoleezza Rice, his future secretary of state; she said that, if elected, working more closely with countries on that continent should be a significant part of his foreign policy. She also told him that HIV/AIDS was a central problem in Africa but that the United States was spending only $500 million per year on global AIDS, with the money spread across six federal agencies, without a clear strategy for curbing the epidemic.”

Key Facts (As provided by Kaiser Health & Family Foundation)

  • Although the U.S. has been involved in efforts to address the global AIDS crisis since the mid-1980s, the creation of the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) in 2003 marked a significant increase in funding and attention to the epidemic.
  • PEPFAR is the largest commitment by any nation to address a single disease in the world; to date, its funding has totaled more than $110 billion, including funding for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund), to which the U.S. government is the largest donor. PEPFAR is credited with saving millions of lives and helping to change the trajectory of the global HIV epidemic.
  • U.S. funding for PEPFAR grew from $2.2 billion in FY 2004 to $7.0 billion in FY 2022; FY 2022 funding includes $5.4 billion provided for bilateral HIV efforts and $1.6 billion for multilateral efforts ($50 million for UNAIDS and $1.56 billion for the Global Fund).
  • As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to have profound effects across the world, PEPFAR has acted to respond to COVID-19 in countries that receive support in order to minimize HIV service disruptions and leverage the program’s capabilities to address COVID-19 more broadly.
  • Looking ahead, PEPFAR faces several issues and challenges, including how best to: address the short- and long-term impacts of COVID-19 on PEPFAR and the HIV response; accelerate progress toward epidemic control in the context of flat funding; support and strengthen community-led responses and the sustainability of HIV programs; define its role in global health security and broader health systems strengthening efforts; and continue to coordinate with other key players in the HIV ecosystem, including the Global Fund.

Key Activities and Results (As provided by Kaiser Health & Family Foundation)

PEPFAR activities focus on expanding access to HIV prevention, treatment, and care interventions. These include provision of antiretroviral treatment, pre-exposure prophylaxis, voluntary male circumcision, condoms, and other commodities related to HIV services. In addition, PEPFAR has launched specific initiatives in key strategic areas. For example, in 2015, PEPFAR launched DREAMS, a public-private partnership that aims to reduce HIV infections in adolescent girls and young women.

The latest results reported by PEPFAR indicate that it has:

  • supported testing services for 63.4 million people in FY 2021;
  • prevented 2.8 million babies from being born with HIV, who would have otherwise been infected;
  • provided care for more than 7.1 million orphans and vulnerable children (OVC);
  • supported training for nearly 300,000 new health care workers; and
  • supported antiretroviral treatment for 18.96 million people.
  • In the 15 countries implementing the DREAMS initiative, new diagnoses among adolescent girls and young women have declined with most DREAMS areas (96%) experiencing declines greater than 25% and nearly two-thirds with declines greater than 40%.

The achievements of the PEPFAR program have been remarkable, well-documented by outside evaluators, and hugely applauded throughout the advocacy community and the developing world. In general, milestones have been met, the program has been enlarged (for instance, to include some research on implementation of medical assistance), the roster of PEPFAR countries has grown and spending plans have not been exceeded.

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AIDS and HIV

FDA eases blood donation restrictions for gay & bisexual men

The FDA’s proposal would lift the mandatory three-month deferral period for some men who have sex with men

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FDA headquarters (Photo Credit: U.S. Government/GSA)

SILVER SPRING, Md. – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) introduced a proposed change to its blood donation guidelines on Friday that would ease restrictions for gay and bisexual men.

The FDA notes the proposal, news of which was first reported in November, would bring U.S. policies in alignment with those in place in countries like the U.K. and Canada. The agency is expected to formally adopt the new guidelines after a public comment period.

The move follows criticism from LGBTQ groups and organizations like the American Medical Association (AMA) who have long argued the current policy is homophobic and based on an outdated understanding of the risks associated with blood donation by men who have sex with men.

As the AMA wrote of the current policy: “a man who has protected sex with another man in the three months prior to a blood donation cannot be a donor, but a man or woman who has unprotected sex with multiple partners of the opposite sex over the same time period remains eligible.”

The FDA’s proposal would lift the mandatory three-month deferral period for some men who have sex with men and instead use a “gender-inclusive, individual risk-based questions relevant to HIV risk.”

Potential donors would be asked for information about their sexual history over the past three months. Respondents who indicate they have had sex with one or more new sexual partners would then be asked whether they have had anal sex during this period. Those who answer “yes” would be deferred from blood donation.

Axios noted that as of this morning, about 20 percent of the country’s community blood centers have a one-day supply or less, while the FDA’s broadened eligibility criteria would increase the annual blood supply by two to four percent, citing data from America’s Blood Centers’ daily tracker and the Williams Institute.

U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.) issued a statement celebrating the FDA’s proposal. “As I have long advocated for, this blood donation policy takes a step forward and is better rooted in the most up-to-date science with a focus on individual risk factors, not outdated stigmas that effectively ban gay and bisexual men,” she said.

Baldwin has repeatedly urged the agency to revisit its blood donation policy over the years, including by corralling support from other members of Congress to cosign letters to the FDA in 2014 and 2016, raising the issue again in 2020 as the COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated shortages in the blood supply.

The Congressional LGBTQ+ Equality Caucus also acknowledged the move in a statement by its chair, Rep. Mark Pocan (D-Wis.): “I am glad the FDA is finally moving toward an individual risk-based assessment model, but recognize, based on existing reporting, that many LGBTQI+ people may still be barred from donating,” he said. “I look forward to taking a closer look at the proposed guidelines once they are published and working with the FDA to ensure that any unnecessary barriers are removed.”

Several LGBTQ groups also issued statements celebrating the FDA’s new guidance.

“These changes are 40-plus years in the making, and are a tremendous leap forward toward elevating science over stigma,” said GLAAD President Sarah Kate Ellis. “GLAAD and leading medical experts have long been advocating for guidelines that see and treat LGBTQ people the same as any other person, including as potential donors who want to help others.”

“This new policy removes a decades-long barrier for many in our community – and there is more to do to ensure gay, bisexual and transgender people are no longer unfairly stigmatized when they try to donate blood,” Human Rights Campaign President Kelley Robinson said. “The assessment criteria have flaws, focusing excessively, for instance, on the number of partners a potential donor has instead of just on new partners,” she added.

Carl Schmid, executive director of the HIV+ Hepatitis Policy Institute, said: “While this long-overdue change is being made based on the science and the facts, which have been clear for years, it is the result of the leadership of the Biden administration that continues to tear down discriminatory government policies.”

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AIDS and HIV

Experimental HIV vaccine failure, deemed safe but ineffective

“We remain steadfast in our commitment to advancing innovation in HIV & hope the data from Mosaico will provide insights for future efforts”

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HIV (Photo Credit: National Institutes of Health)

BETHESDA, Md. – A clinical trial of an investigational HIV vaccine regimen, being conducted in partnership with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) by Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies and global partners of parent company Johnson & Johnson dubbed “Mosaico,” was discontinued.

In an announcement made Wednesday, NIAID said the HIV vaccine regimen tested among men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender people was safe but did not provide protection against HIV acquisition, an independent data and safety monitoring board had determined.

A spokesperson for Johnson & Johnson noted in light of the board’s determination, the Mosaico clinical trial will be discontinued. Participant notifications and further analyses of the data are underway. Throughout the trial, study investigators have ensured that any individuals who contracted HIV received prompt HIV treatment and care.

Both Johnson & Johnson and NIAID stressed that no safety issues with the vaccine regimen were identified.

“We are disappointed with this outcome and stand in solidarity with the people and communities vulnerable to and affected by HIV,” said Penny Heaton, M.D., Global Therapeutic Area Head, Vaccines, Janssen Research & Development, LLC. “Though there have been significant advances in prevention since the beginning of the global epidemic, 1.5 million people acquired HIV in 2021 alone, underscoring the high unmet need for new options and why we have long worked to tackle this global health challenge. We remain steadfast in our commitment to advancing innovation in HIV, and we hope the data from Mosaico will provide insights for future efforts to develop a safe and effective vaccine. We are grateful to our Mosaico partners and the study investigators, staff and participants.”

Janssen Vaccines & Prevention sponsored the Mosaico study with funding support from NIAID, part of the National Institutes of Health. The trial was conducted by the NIAID-funded HIV Vaccine Clinical Trials Network, based at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. The U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command provided additional study support.

The Phase 3 Mosaico Study:

Mosaico, a Phase 3 study of Janssen’s investigational HIV vaccine regimen, began in 2019, and completed vaccinations in October 2022. The study included approximately 3,900 cisgender men and transgender people who have sex with cisgender men and/or transgender people, who represent groups and populations vulnerable to HIV, at over 50 trial sites in Argentina, Brazil, Italy, Mexico, Peru, Poland, Puerto Rico, Spain and the United States.

The study evaluated an investigational vaccine regimen containing a mosaic-based adenovirus serotype 26 vector (Ad26.Mos4.HIV) administered during four vaccination visits over one year. A mix of soluble proteins (Clade C/Mosaic gp140, adjuvanted with aluminum phosphate) was also administered at visits three and four.

The Mosaico DSMB analysis, based on the data available to date, indicated that the regimen does not protect against HIV and the study is not expected to meet its primary endpoint. No safety issues with the vaccine regimen were identified. In light of this, the study will be discontinued, and further analyses are underway.

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Fentanyl Crisis

Fentanyl took life of 18-year-old actor Tyler Sanders says coroner

The actor had a history of drug use and cops allegedly found “a plastic straw and white powder in the room where he died”

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Sanders/Instagram

LOS ANGELES – The June 16, 2022 death of Tyler Sanders, 18, was an accidental overdose from fentanyl says a report released by the Los Angeles County Medical Examiner. The actor, star of 9-1-1: Lone Star” and “The Rookie” and formerly “Fear The Walking Dead”  had a history of drug abuse the report stated according to celebrity news webzine TMZ which obtained and published the report.

Sources had told TMZ at the time of the actor’s death he had a history of drug use and LAPD investigators had found “a plastic straw and white powder in the room where he died.”

In the full coroner’s report obtained by the entertainment site, Sanders texted a friend the night before he died where he mentioned he was using fentanyl. The report went on to mention that the actor didn’t answer his phone when that friend attempted to call him after sending the text.

The Los Angeles Police Department found Sanders unresponsive in bed in the home where he lived alone. The report also detailed more apparent illicit drugs were found in the bathroom.

The report mentioned Sanders’ history of drug abuse, which included heroin, cocaine, LSD, mushrooms, and Xanax. He had no history of medical problems.

The New York Post noted that Sanders, who entered showbiz at age 10, is perhaps known for starring in “9-1-1: Lone Star” opposite Rob Lowe. He also appeared “The Rookie,” “Fear the Walking Dead” and the Amazon Prime series “Just Add Magic: Mystery City.”

Also a student of stand-up comedy and improv, the rising star earned a 2021 Daytime Emmy nomination for his role as Leo in the “Just Add Magic” spin-off, and had a pair of independent films currently in postproduction, per to his IMDb.com profile.

Sanders/Instagram

Sanders was also active on social media, boasting an Instagram page with over 12,000 followers, where he frequently shared photos of himself with co-stars, friends and other adventures.

ET Canada reported after Sanders’ cause of death was revealed, his family released emotional statements, insisting that they hope the actor’s death can help others who might be struggling with their mental health.

Sanders’ father David shared, “Tyler was an ambitious, hard-working actor who was dealing with deep and persistent depression. Although actively seeking treatment, Tyler struggled to find relief and chose to experiment with drugs.

“Tyler fell into drug use, not as a way to have fun socially, but rather as an attempt to overcome his profound mental health struggle. While we continue to mourn his death, we are determined to share Tyler’s story in hopes of furthering the conversation around this pervasive issue.”

His mother, Ginger, added: “Losing Tyler due to fentanyl poisoning has been incredibly difficult. I want others to understand that we are a family much like all other families who never thought this could happen to us.

“Tyler had a strong support system and still could not overcome his persistent depression. Perhaps because of his depression, Tyler sought out deep connections and to bring those around him joy.

“While Tyler quietly fought his inner battles, he was outwardly determined to make sure no one felt as he did. Tyler loved the Lord, loved people and did his best every day. It is our sincere prayer that our story might save others.”

Officials in Los Angeles County law enforcement and public health agencies in November announced that the number of fentanyl-related deaths had leaped upwards by 1,280%, from 109 in 2016 to 1,504 in 2021.

“Tragically, in L.A. County, about four people die each day from a fentanyl overdose and this devastating loss touches families all across the county,” Dr. Barbara Ferrer, the LA County Public Health Director told reporters during a recent press conference.

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration Laboratory has found that, of the fentanyl-laced fake prescription pills analyzed in 2022, six out of ten now contain a potentially lethal dose of fentanyl. This is an increase from DEA’s previous announcement in 2021 that four out of ten fentanyl-laced fake prescription pills were found to contain a potentially lethal dose.

“More than half of the fentanyl-laced fake prescription pills being trafficked in communities across the country now contain a potentially deadly dose of fentanyl. This marks a dramatic increase – from four out of ten to six out of ten – in the number of pills that can kill,” said Administrator Anne Milgram. “These pills are being mass-produced by the Sinaloa Cartel and the Jalisco Cartel in Mexico. Never take a pill that wasn’t prescribed directly to you. Never take a pill from a friend. Never take a pill bought on social media. Just one pill is dangerous and one pill can kill.”

Just two milligrams of fentanyl, the small amount that fits on the tip of a pencil or Abe Lincoln’s nose on a penny, is considered a potentially deadly dose. (Photo Credit: USDEA)

“The proliferation into prescription drug lookalikes show that four out of 10 pills that are recovered today by the Los Angeles Police Department, and across this country, contain a deadly and fatal amount of fentanyl,” LAPD Chief Michel Moore said.

The DEA notes that those pills are largely made by two Mexican drug cartels, the Sinaloa Cartel and the Jalisco (CJNG) Cartel, to look identical to real prescription medications, including OxyContin®, Percocet®, and Xanax®, and they are often deadly. The two cartels using chemicals largely sourced from China, are primarily responsible for the vast majority of the fentanyl that is being trafficked in communities across the United States.

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Fentanyl Crisis

Fentanyl to potentially kill entire population of North America seized

DEA & other agencies confiscated more than 379 million deadly doses of fentanyl in 2022. It remains the deadliest drug threat facing the U.S.

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Rainbow-colored pills allegedly containing fentanyl were seized during a DEA-FBI operation in November 2022 (Photo Credit: USDEA)

WASHINGTON – In a press conference this week, U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration Administrator Anne Milgram told reporters that the DEA and other federal agencies confiscated more than 379 million deadly doses of fentanyl this year, which was enough to potentially kill every American.

“These seizures – enough deadly doses of fentanyl to kill every American – reflect  DEA’s unwavering commitment to protect Americans and save lives, by tenaciously pursuing those responsible for the trafficking of fentanyl across the United States,” she said.

The DEA head also noted that seizures included 50.6 million fentanyl-laced fake prescription pills and more than 10,000 pounds of fentanyl powder.

Federal officials warn that fentanyl “is a highly addictive man-made opioid that is 50 times more potent than heroin. Just two milligrams of fentanyl, the small amount that fits on the tip of a pencil, is considered a potentially deadly dose.”

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration Laboratory has found that, of the fentanyl-laced fake prescription pills analyzed in 2022, six out of ten now contain a potentially lethal dose of fentanyl. This is an increase from DEA’s previous announcement in 2021 that four out of ten fentanyl-laced fake prescription pills were found to contain a potentially lethal dose.

“More than half of the fentanyl-laced fake prescription pills being trafficked in communities across the country now contain a potentially deadly dose of fentanyl. This marks a dramatic increase – from four out of ten to six out of ten – in the number of pills that can kill,” said Administrator Milgram. “These pills are being mass-produced by the Sinaloa Cartel and the Jalisco Cartel in Mexico. Never take a pill that wasn’t prescribed directly to you. Never take a pill from a friend. Never take a pill bought on social media. Just one pill is dangerous and one pill can kill.”

The DEA notes that those pills are largely made by the two Mexican drug cartels look identical to real prescription medications, including OxyContin®, Percocet®, and Xanax®, and they are often deadly. The two cartels using chemicals largely sourced from China, are primarily responsible for the vast majority of the fentanyl that is being trafficked in communities across the United States.

In Los Angeles alone, DEA officials seized more than 7 million fentanyl pills and more than 1,000 pounds of fentanyl powder this year.

DEA lab officials estimate that amount represents more than 38 million potentially deadly doses of the narcotic, which would be enough to kill the entire population of the largest counties in Southern California.

DEA Los Angeles Special Agent in Charge Bill Bodner called the region a “major transshipment hub” for fentanyl and other drugs, and for that reason, his agency is committed to saving lives.

“As people prepare to celebrate the holidays and gather with friends and family let us be mindful of the fentanyl threat that is destroying families across the nation and leaving empty seats at the dinner table this year,” Bodner said. “These seizures represent our tenacious efforts to make our communities safer and our ongoing commitment to save lives.”

Governor Gavin Newsom released the following statement on the end-of-year numbers in California’s comprehensive and historic fight toward ending the opioid epidemic.

“The opioid crisis has touched every part of California, and our nation, this year. As we mourn the many lives lost, California is working harder than ever to fight this crisis and protect people from these dangerous drugs to ensure our communities are kept safe in the first place,” said Governor Newsom. “California is cracking down on the fentanyl crisis – increasing seizures, making resources more available to Californians, and ensuring communities have what they need to combat the immeasurable harm opioids have caused our society, our communities, and our loved ones.”

KEY NUMBERS:

  • MORE THAN $1 BILLION INVESTED since the beginning of the Newsom Administration to address the opioid crisis, with CalHHS investing $450 Million in the current fiscal year.
  • 28,765 POUNDS SEIZED by law enforcement with support from the California National Guard in support of law enforcement during 2022, an estimated street value of more than $230 Million and saving potentially hundreds of millions of lives according to the DEA.
  • 594% INCREASE IN FENTANYL SEIZED by law enforcement with help from the California National Guard compared to 2021.
  • 166 NEW GUARD MEMBERS hired, trained, and embedded by California’s National Guard to support the Governor’s initiative to reduce deadly fentanyl in communities.

RECENT ACTION: The Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) is making millions of dollars in grants available to address the ongoing opioid epidemic. Today, DHCS announced it will bolster efforts to raise awareness of the life-saving drug Naloxone by working with colleges and universities across California.

On Tuesday, DHCS announced that millions of dollars in grants are available to help improve patient care in the areas of substance use disorder, opioid use disorder, and addictions. Last week, DHCS announced that millions of dollars in new grants were now available to tackle youth opioid use, including schools and other nonprofit organizations.

In July, the state of California received more than $100 million as part of the national opioid settlement with multiple major pharmaceutical companies. And as part of last year’s budget, Newsom provided additional funding to increase the California National Guard’s capacity to combat the fentanyl crisis and support federal, state and local law enforcement counter-narcotic investigations and operations.

Fentanyl remains the deadliest drug threat facing the U.S. as it is a highly addictive synthetic opioid that is 50 times more potent than heroin and 100 times more potent than morphine.  Just two milligrams of fentanyl, the small amount that fits on the tip of a pencil, is considered a potentially deadly dose.

Just two milligrams of fentanyl, the small amount that fits on the tip of a pencil or Abe Lincoln’s nose on a penny, is considered a potentially deadly dose.
(Photo Credit: USDEA)

According to the CDC, 107,622 Americans died of drug poisoning in 2021, with 66 percent of those deaths involving synthetic opioids like fentanyl. 

For more information on the dangers of fentanyl, please visit Fentanyl Awareness (dea.gov).

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Commentary

Condoms are Plan A: Back to the future of condoms 

A combination of pharma greed, government squeamishness & the libertine position of advocates left us unprotected from a tidal wave of STIs

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Free condoms on the Sao Paulo subway system in Brazil (Washington Blade file photo by Michael K. Lavers)

By Michael Weinstein | LOS ANGELES – The world has completed a ten-year experiment with HIV prevention and the results are clear. PrEP and HIV treatment to prevent transmission have been found wanting. 1.5 million people globally became infected with HIV last year [1]. STIs are at an all-time high, a tragic turn from where we were just twenty years ago when syphilis was close to being eradicated. The US alone had 2.5 million combined cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis in 2021 [2]. Not to mention millions of teen pregnancies and unwanted babies.

For anyone looking at our circumstance objectively, it is clear that the pure biomedical interventions will never take the place of condoms as the first line of defense against HIV, STIs, and unplanned pregnancy. Yet condom promotion is virtually non-existent, and the condom culture is destroyed.

A combination of pharma greed, government squeamishness, and the libertine position of many advocates has left us unprotected against the tidal wave of STIs that is sweeping the world. It is easy enough to understand why condoms are not popular. Many people feel they’re uncomfortable, interrupt spontaneity, aren’t there when you need them, and on and on.

Governments don’t want to promote condoms because it would force them to talk about the “icky” subject of sex. Religious groups oppose them because they promote sexual pleasure over reproduction. Libertarians see them as a restriction on their freedom.

Beyond the health implications, it is time to look at condoms as an alternative to abortion. With the right to choose having been trashed by the Supreme Court, alternatives to medical abortions are getting a second look. The public health system in the US must choose an avenue to focus on where primary prevention will take place.

Plan B medication interrupts conception within 72 hours of a sexual encounter. Plan C can end a pregnancy.

Why not have a Plan A—Condoms. Hershel Walker, who recently lost his race for the Senate in Georgia, repeatedly asked a woman to have an abortion. Did he consider a condom? Arnold Schwarzenegger had an affair with the housekeeper that busted up his marriage. Did he consider a condom?

At AHF Wellness Centers, we have many frequent flyers who routinely test positive for STIs. Antibiotics do the job (for now), clearing up infections quickly so the next infection can take its place. Is using a condom such a high price to pay for preventing multiple infections? People who test positive for STIs are more likely to get HIV in the future [3].

If we continue down this route, we know where it goes. Rampant increases in STIs are costly, can result in infertility, cause still births due to syphilis (congenital syphilis rates tragically increased 184.5% over the past five years), create drug resistant gonorrhea, and incite relationship break-ups [2]. Despite these serious outcomes, we see STIs as a temporary inconvenience and do not take them seriously.

There has never been any question that biomedical interventions can help an individual and should be freely available without any stigma. However, ten years in there still isn’t any proof that biomedical interventions alone will reduce HIV, but we know they will stoke STIs. Nevertheless, we are heavily exporting this failed experiment to the world. And who benefits most—Pharma giants Gilead and GSK.

Government policy must adjust to the realities of primary prevention. We need to go back to basics and promote condoms as the primary means to prevent HIV/STIs if we are to have any chance of bringing rates down. Focusing in on condoms gives the power of prevention and control back to the individual, it won’t get tied up in medical appointments and pharma profits.

Some want us to double down and give preventative antibiotics to stave STIs. This may lead to increases in unprotected sex and inevitably to antibiotic resistance, which is a growing existential public health threat [4].

Prevention is a tough road to hoe. You will never be completely successful in promoting healthier behavior. But, having bent the stick so dangerously in one direction it is time to bend it back.

Sources

1. HIV.gov. The Global HIV/AIDS Epidemic. Available online: https://www.hiv.gov/hiv-basics/overview/data-and-trends/global-statistics

2. CDC Preliminary 2021 STD Surveillance Data. Available online: https://www.cdc.gov/std/statistics/2021/default.htm 

3. CDC STDs and HIV – CDC Basic Fact Sheet. Available online: https://www.cdc.gov/std/hiv/stdfact-std-hiv.htm 

4. CDC. Antimicrobial-Resistant Gonorrhea Basic Information. Available online: https://www.cdc.gov/std/gonorrhea/arg/basic.htm 

************************************

Michael Weinstein is the president of Los Angeles-based AIDS Healthcare Foundation (AHF), the largest global AIDS organization. 

The Foundation now operates in over 730 treatment clinics in more than 45 countries globally: over 68 outpatient AHF Healthcare Centers in over 16 states as well as in the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. AHF also operates more than 60 pharmacies in over 17 states and also operates a clinical research unit.

Under its Positive Healthcare brand, AHF operates managed care programs for people living with HIV and/or AIDS in California, Florida, and Georgia.

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LGBTQ+ Youth Mental Health

Caroline Cruz responds to media coverage

The 14-year-old Cruz was suffering from self-inflicted stab wounds and was rushed to hospital Tuesday night

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Caroline Cruz via _caro_iguess_ caroline?!/TikTok

HOUSTON – In a scripted TikTok post, Caroline Cruz, the 14-year-old daughter of Texas Republican U.S. Senator Ted Cruz responded to the intense media coverage and interest in her medical emergency Tuesday evening at the family’s home in the toney River Oaks neighborhood of Houston.

“I wanted to address this on my own because the media is causing my mental health to be exploited for their gain. I also don’t enjoy the assumptions on why I did what I did. No, it had nothing to do with my sexuality or my father. I’m not suicidal but I am experiencing some mental issues. I’m working through it and getting the help I need. Thank you so much for all the support and love, it means a lot to me. But the most traumatizing part of this experience is how public it’s been,” Cruz told the viewers of her post.

@_caro_iguess_

before yall ask yes i am reading from a script, i had a lit ti say and i wanted to day it right so im sorry if it sounds superficial THANK YOU @finn ♰ @Kat for being the best friends ever

♬ son original – caroline?!
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