Connect with us

Long Beach

Statue of civil rights icon Martin Luther King Jr. vandalized in Long Beach

This is the second time within the past two years the statue has been vandalized with graffiti often associated with white supremacist groups.

Published

on

Picture of desecrated statue via Twitter

LONG BEACH – A statue of civil rights icon Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was spray painted with what appeared to be emblems from the Nazi German era including a swastika and the Schutzstaffel (SS) dual lightening bolt runes.

According to the Long Beach Police Department, officers were dispatched to a call about the statue being vandalized at approximately 3:30 PM on Friday. It is located within the Martin Luther King Jr. Park at 1950 Lemon Avenue.

A LBPD spokesperson told the Blade Monday that the vandalism is being investigated as a hate crime or hate bias criminal act and acknowledged that this is the second time within the past two years the statue has been vandalized with graffiti often associated with white supremacist groups.

In a tweet, Long Beach Mayor Robert Garcia called the graffiti “horrific,” assuring residents that police are working to find whoever’s responsible.

“Our MLK statue is a symbol of hope and justice for the community,” the mayor said. “This hate and desecration has no place in our city.”

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Community Services - PSA

Public Health warning of “Real Water” Brand possible link to acute Non-viral Hepatitis

Public Health has not received any reports of persons in L.A. County with acute non-viral hepatitis illness linked to this recall at this time

Published

on

Photo Credit: County of Los Angeles Department of Public Health

LOS ANGELES – The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (Public Health) is alerting everyone that the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is recommending that consumers, restaurants, and retailers discontinue drinking, cooking with, selling, or serving “Real Water” alkaline water.

The FDA along with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Southern Nevada Health District and partners are investigating reports of acute non-viral hepatitis in Nevada. To date, the consumption of “Real Water” brand alkaline water was found to be the only common link identified between all the cases. The FDA is conducting a further investigation into the “Real Water” facility. The Southern Nevada Health District is continuing to monitor for cases of acute non-viral hepatitis.

Public Health has not received any reports of persons in L.A. County with acute non-viral hepatitis illness linked to this recall at this time.

Since “Real Water” may be sold in Los Angeles County and surrounding jurisdictions, Public Health is advising consumers who have purchased the product not to consume the water.  Consumers should either discard the product or return it to the place of purchase for a refund.

Photo Credit: County of Los Angeles Department of Public Health

Acute non-viral hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver and symptoms often include fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dark urine, light-colored stools, joint pain, and yellow skin or eyes. Anyone who is experiencing these symptoms should contact their health care provider.

For more information regarding the recall, visit:

https://www.fda.gov/food/outbreaks-foodborne-illness/investigation-acute-non-viral-hepatitis-illnesses-real-water-brand-alkaline-water-march-2021

Photo Credit: County of Los Angeles Department of Public Health
Continue Reading

Coronavirus

Newsom orders limited stay at home order as COVID surges

The virus is spreading at a pace we haven’t seen since the start of this pandemic

Published

on

California Governor Gavin Newsom (Blade file photograph)

SACRAMENTO – In light of an unprecedented, rapid rise in COVID-19 cases across California, Governor Gavin Newsom and the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) announced Thursday afternoon that a limited Stay at Home Order generally requiring that non-essential work, movement and gatherings stop between 10 PM and 5 AM in counties in the purple tier.

This includes Los Angeles, Orange, Ventura, Riverside and San Bernardino counties.

The order will take effect at 10 PM Saturday, November 21 and remain in effect until 5 AM December 21. This is the same as the March Stay at Home Order, but applied only between 10 PM and 5 AM and only in purple tier counties that are seeing the highest rates of positive cases and hospitalizations.

“The virus is spreading at a pace we haven’t seen since the start of this pandemic and the next several days and weeks will be critical to stop the surge. We are sounding the alarm,” the Governor said. “It is crucial that we act to decrease transmission and slow hospitalizations before the death count surges. We’ve done it before and we must do it again.”

Non-essential businesses and personal gatherings are prohibited between 10 PM and 5 AM beginning Saturday, November 21 at 10 PM

This limited Stay at Home Order is designed to reduce opportunities for disease transmission. Activities conducted during 10 PM to 5 AM are often non-essential and more likely related to social activities and gatherings that have a higher likelihood of leading to reduced inhibition and reduced likelihood for adherence to safety measures like wearing a face covering and maintaining physical distance.

“We know from our stay at home order this spring, which flattened the curve in California, that reducing the movement and mixing of individuals dramatically decreases COVID-19 spread, hospitalizations, and deaths,” said California Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mark Ghaly. “We may need to take more stringent actions if we are unable to flatten the curve quickly. Taking these hard, temporary actions now could help prevent future shutdowns.”

“We are asking Californians to change their personal behaviors to stop the surge. We must be strong together and make tough decisions to stay socially connected but physically distanced during this critical time. Letting our guard down could put thousands of lives in danger and cripple our health care system,” said Dr. Erica Pan, the state’s acting Public Health Officer.

“It is especially important that we band together to protect those most vulnerable around us as well as essential workers who are continuing their critical work amidst this next wave of widespread community transmission across the state. Together we prevented a public health crisis in the spring and together we can do it again.”

COVID-19 case rates increased by approximately 50 percent in California during the first week of November. As a result, Governor Newsom and California’s public health officials have announced a list of measures to protect Californians and the state’s health care system, which could experience an unprecedented surge if cases continue their steep climb.

During his regularly scheduled press briefing Monday, California Governor Gavin Newsom announced that effective Tuesday, November 17, he would be pulling the “emergency brake” on the state’s efforts to reopen its economy and lifting societal restrictions imposed by the coronavirus pandemic.

“We are sounding the alarm,” Newsom told reporters. “California is experiencing the fastest increase in cases we have seen yet –faster than what we experienced at the outset of the pandemic or even this summer.”

“The spread of COVID-19, if left unchecked, could quickly overwhelm our health care system and lead to catastrophic outcomes,” he added.

Late last week, Newsom issued a travel advisory for California joining Oregon Governor Kate Brown and Washington State Governor Jay Inslee, urging people entering their states or returning home from travel outside of the state(s) to self-quarantine to slow the spread of the virus. The travel advisory urges against non-essential out-of-state travel, asks people to self-quarantine for 14 days after arriving from another state or country, and encourages residents to stay local.

Continue Reading

Coronavirus

CDC warns Americans- Don’t travel for Thanksgiving

“The best way to celebrate Thanksgiving this year is to stay home and celebrate with people who live in your household.”

Published

on

Centers for Disease Control Atlanta Headquarters (Photograph via CDC)

ATLANTA – The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended that Americans do not travel this Thanksgiving. Speaking to reporters in a press briefing Thursday, Dr. Henry Walke, the CDC’s COVID-19 incident manager, said that his agency is “recommending against travel during the Thanksgiving period.”

“The tragedy that could happen is that one of your family members from coming to this family gathering and they could end up severely ill, hospitalized or dying. And we don’t want that to happen,” Walke said. “These times are tough, it’s been a long outbreak, almost 11 months or and we understand people are tired.”

“We understand that people want to see their family and relatives and do it as they’ve always done it. But this year we’re asking them to limit their travel,” he added.

In a media statement released Wednesday, Dr. Barbara Ferrer, the Los Angeles County Director of Public Health said, “The best way to celebrate Thanksgiving this year is to stay home and celebrate with people who live in your household.  Connect with friends and family you don’t live with using all of the technology that allows us to see and hear each other from afar.”

“If you do choose to gather, closely follow the guidance for private gatherings.  Gather outdoors with no more than two other households, and no more than 15 people; wear face coverings unless eating or drinking and stay at least 6 feet apart. Limit the gathering to no more than two hours and do not share food or utensils,” she added.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement

Follow Us @LosAngelesBlade

Sign Up for Blade eBlasts

Popular