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Los Angeles County

250,000 COVID cases over past 7 days, unvaccinated at extreme risk

“While the small decreases in daily cases numbers, hospitalizations and test positivity are hopeful signs- we will need to remain cautious”

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Photo Credit: County of Los Angeles

LOS ANGELES – The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health released the latest data on COVID-19 Saturday that noted the County continues seeing high rates of transmission with more than 250,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases over the past 7 days, down from the 291,000 cases reported for the previous 7 days.

“While the small decreases in our daily cases numbers, hospitalizations and test positivity are hopeful signs that the spread of Omicron is declining, we will need to remain cautious these next few weeks while transmission remains at the highest levels we have ever seen,” said Dr. Barbara Ferrer, Director of Public Health. “With an average of 35,000 new cases identified each day, it is very easy for any one of us to encounter an infected person during the week. Avoiding crowds, keeping distance, wearing a high-quality mask, and washing our hands add layers of protection that can help each of us stay safe while also shielding essential workers during the surge.” 

The latest data on COVID-19:

  • 39,117 new COVID-19 cases (2,467,797 cases to date)
  • 72 new deaths due to COVID-19 (28,417 deaths to date)
  • 4,698 people currently hospitalized with COVID-19
  • More than 10,848,000 individuals tested; 21% of people tested positive to date

Faces of the COVID19 pandemic

UPDATED, Monday January 24. KTLA reported that 40-year-old Christian Cabrera died from complications due to COVID. (See below)

KTLA reported on a West Hollywood resident Friday, Christian Cabrera, a 40-year-old father who was rushed to the emergency room last week, when he began struggling to breathe. Cabrera, who is not vaccinated and his condition has only gotten worse with pneumonia in both lungs “He keeps saying, ‘please keep take care of my son,’” his brother, Jino Cabrera told KTLA. “He knows he might not make it. He might die in there.”

According to KTLA, Cabrera’s lungs are now weak, making it difficult for him to speak. But he was able to send his brother a text message from his hospital bed in Sherman Oaks late Thursday.

“I can’t breathe again,” the message read. “I really regret not getting my vaccine, if I can do it all over again I would do it in a heartbeat to save my life. I’m fighting for my life here and I wish I have gotten vaccinated.”

Angelenos who were both vaccinated and boosted are 25 times less likely to end up in the ICU than unvaccinated people, according to the county health department.

“If you are fighting an enemy that is relentless, I think it’s vitally important to give your body every chance possible to get better because that’s what getting yourself vaccinated and boosted will do,” Dr. Thomas Yadegar, medical director of the ICU at Providence Cedars Sinai Tarzana Medical Center, told KTLA.

On Thursday, the County Department of Public Health confirmed 102 new COVID-19 deaths — the highest number reported in a single day since March 2021.

About 90% of those deaths were among residents who became ill with COVID-19 after Dec. 24, officials said.

Countywide, COVID-19 patients account for about 30% of those in the county’s intensive care units.

“Let’s not fool ourselves by not recognizing the danger presented by the Omicron variant which is capable of spreading with lightning speed and causing serious illness among our most vulnerable residents,” L.A. County Health Director Barbara Ferrer said in a statement Tuesday.

The family announced Christian Cabrera’s passing on an Instagram post on Saturday. 

“He touched so many people’s lives because was a very loving, kind, generous, caring person with a beautiful heart and soul,” the post read. “Christian was always the one to make people laugh and bring joy into a lot of peoples’ lives… He’s always there for his family and friends whenever they need him.” 

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Los Angeles County

Assemblymember Santiago: Up food access to undocumented Californians

A study from the Food4All Coalition, in partnership with UCLA research, 45% of undocumented Californians face food insecurity

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Assemblymember Miguel Santiago (Twitter/Assemblymember Miguel Santiago)

LOS ANGELES – The sharply rising costs of food, housing, gasoline, coupled with the inflation rate hovering at 8.3%  has many Californian scrambling to supplement their access to food. The cost for food alone in the Southern California region has risen 1% from February 2022 to March 2022, and food prices were 8.8% higher than in March 2021.

Governor Gavin Newsom had previously announced in January that he intended to extend CalFresh public food assistance programs in the budget to include undocumented immigrants ages 55 and over, a move advocates including state Assemblymember Miguel Santiago, who represents the 53rd District covering parts of downtown L.A. applauded as a first step in curbing food insecurity for millions of low-income Californians.

At the beginning of the month in Newsom’s revised budget the governor removed exclusions to the California Food Assistance Program for Californians 55 and older, regardless of immigration status.

Santiago, joined by the Food4All Coalition, the LA Regional Food Bank, the California Immigrant Policy Center, Gender Justice LA, and Nourish California gathered for a ‘ Food4All” rally Friday in Los Angeles to ensure that all ages are to be included in Newsom’s revised proposal.

“If you qualify for CalFresh program, you should have the ability to obtain the dollars to be able to feed your kids,” said Santiago.

Betzabel Estudillo ( Nourish California /Twitter)

Betzabel Estudillo, a senior advocate with Nourish California told the rally attendees; “This campaign has been years in the making. We appreciate the governor’s proposal, but the need is greater. Nearly half of undocumented Californians face food insecurity. It’s even worse for children – 2 out of every 3 are going hungry.”

Currently, all undocumented people are ineligible for CalFresh benefits. Only certain low-income immigrants that have lived in the U.S. for at least five years, including those admitted for humanitarian reasons and those with permanent residence, may be eligible for the benefits. Immigrants who receive disability-related assistance or benefits and children under 18 years old with permanent residency are also eligible, regardless of their entry date.

Newsom’s proposals would revise those CalFresh benefits restrictions.

According to a study from the Food4All Coalition, in partnership with UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 45% of undocumented Californians face food insecurity.

“We’re pushing for a budget that includes over $500 million to be able to feed those who are the hungriest in the state of California,” said Santiago.

Newsom has until the end of June to finalize the budget.

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Los Angeles County

Federal charges alleging man disrupted a “Stop Asian Hate” rally with car

He was driving a black Honda four-door sedan and allegedly yelled, “Go back to China!” and other racial slurs at the demonstrators

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Screenshot/NBC 4 LA

LOS ANGELES COUNTY – A Diamond Bar man was arrested today on federal charges alleging that he disrupted a “Stop Asian Hate” rally in March 2021 by deliberately running a red light, blocking the path of demonstrators lawfully using a crosswalk and yelling racial epithets at them.

Steve Lee Dominguez, 56, is charged in a federal grand jury indictment with two counts of bias-motivated interference with federal protected activities. According to the indictment that was unsealed today, a year ago on March 21, 2021, a “Stop Asian Hate” rally occurred in Diamond Bar. The rally was a protest against the increase in hate crimes and hate incidents against members of the Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) community both locally and nationally – including the murders of six Asian American women five days earlier in Atlanta.

A group of rally participants assembled at the intersection of Diamond Bar Boulevard and Grand Avenue, carrying American flags and large signs in support of their cause. The demonstrators had gathered peacefully and lawfully crossed the streets using the marked pedestrian crosswalk when they had the right of way.

During the rally, Dominguez was driving a black Honda four-door sedan and was stopped at a red light at the intersection. Dominguez allegedly yelled, “Go back to China!” and other racial slurs at the demonstrators. Dominguez then allegedly deliberately drove his car through the intersection’s crosswalk at the red light, made an illegal U-turn and cut off the route of several rally participants lawfully crossing the street.

One of the victims was an Asian woman carrying a sign that read, “Stop Asian Hate.” Another victim was a minor Black female rally participant who carried a sign that read, “End the Violence Against Asians.” Another person who was cut off in the crosswalk was a 9-year-old child, and Dominguez’s car narrowly missed coming into contact with her and other victims, according to the indictment. No injuries were reported.

Dominguez allegedly then pulled his car over some distance away from the intersection, got out of the car and continued to yell racial epithets and threats at the demonstrators. He then called the police, identified himself as “John Doe” and falsely reported to police that the rally participants were blocking the street and he had to run a red light “because they were about to trample my car,” the indictment alleges. He also allegedly requested that police “get some control out” at the intersection.

If convicted of the two charges in the indictment, Dominguez would face a statutory maximum penalty of 20 years in federal prison.

The FBI investigated this matter. The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department initially responded to the scene and assisted in this matter. Assistant United States Attorney Veronica Dragalin is prosecuting this case.

          Any member of the public who has information related to this incident or other hate crimes is encouraged to call the FBI’s Los Angeles Field Office at (310) 477-6565 or report tips online at https://tips.fbi.gov.

Protesters Against Asian Hate Become Witnesses to Their Own Hate Incident | NBCLA March 2021:

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Los Angeles County

LA’s Union Station adds security after complaints about homeless attacks

Police patrolling the transit system experienced a sharp uptick in crimes involving the homeless with a higher percentage at Union Station

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Photo Credit: County of Los Angeles

LOS ANGELES – The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Agency has added more security to Union Station, after staff and the SEIU United Service Workers Union which represents caretakers working there, demanded that the agency take steps to protect workers from ongoing assaults by some of the homeless population living near the station.

“These workers are essential workers, and they should not have to fear for their lives every time they punch in to keep our region’s premier transit station clean for its many patrons,” said Los Angeles County Supervisor Janice Hahn, who also serves on the LA Metro Board of Directors.

“This is a good first step,” said Alejandra Valles, a spokesperson for SEIU United Service Workers West, which represents caretakers working there. “But there is no fix. This is a long-term problem that requires long-term solutions.”

According to a source at Metro with knowledge of the security issues within the system and who asked to remain unidentified, the Los Angeles Police Department, Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department and the Long Beach Police Department who have the current contracts to patrol Metro’s transit system, have experienced a sharp uptick in incidents involving homeless people on transit properties but with a higher percentage of assaults at Union Station.

During the pandemic, the station became a haven for homeless men and women, many with serious mental health problems.

Last week, the Los Angeles Times described widespread fear among low-wage workers at the transit hub who were often mocked and threatened while working. A caretaker was beaten with a club in the bathroom last year where homeless men and women often bathe or use drugs.

During the first two months of this year, violent crime at the station has increased by 94% compared to the same period last year and property crime has doubled.

“Safety is still our top priority,” Metro spokesman David Sotero said in a statement late Thursday. He said the agency works with law enforcement, social services providers and private security “to increase physical security at Union Station and combat criminal activity.”

The Los Angeles Times also reports violent crime is up 94%. Union Station is owned by Metro and the Los Angeles Police Department patrols the property, but in small numbers and not at night.

Private security at the station hasn’t stopped the attacks experienced by janitors, SEIU president David Huerta told KABC 7 last week. “Our understanding, and through the workers’ testimony, is that when the call the police, the police escort the folks off the premises and those folks come right back,” said Huerta. “This is a center point of Los Angeles, the same way that the airport is a center point of L.A. You can see plenty of secured officers at the airport. There needs to be more resources put here to ensure workers can work in safety.”

From Monday, Metro will check that customers have business at the station and kick out anyone who engages in illegal activities. The entrances to the southern and northern gardens where the homeless often rest will be closed. Psychiatric teams will be deployed at the station, in addition to reinforced patrols. And all employees will receive quarterly training in de-escalating tense and potentially dangerous situations.

Deputy Chief of the LAPD Transit Services Bureau Donald Graham declined to say how many officers were deployed but said the department has doubled its resources at Union Station and is now working with private security to coordinate responses.

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