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Governor Newsom signs CARE Court into law

CARE Court is a first-in-the-nation framework to empower individuals suffering from untreated schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders

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Governor Newsom signs CARE Court into law alongside state and local leaders, stakeholders (Photo Credit: Office of the Governor)

SAN JOSE – Alongside state and local leaders and Californians impacted by mental illness, Governor Gavin Newsom today signed legislation enacting CARE Court, a paradigm shift that will provide individuals with severe mental health and substance use disorders the care and services they need to get healthy.
 
The Community Assistance, Recovery, and Empowerment Act – SB 1338 by Senator Thomas Umberg (D-Santa Ana) and Senator Susan Talamantes Eggman (D-Stockton) – will provide help upstream, ahead of conservatorships and outside the walls of institutions. Under CARE Court, families, clinicians, first responders and others will be able to refer individuals suffering from schizophrenia spectrum or psychotic disorders.
 
“With overwhelming support from the Legislature and stakeholders across California, CARE Court will now become a reality in our state, offering hope and a new path forward for thousands of struggling Californians and empowering their loved ones to help,” said Governor Newsom. “I thank our legislators and the broad coalition of partners who made this day possible and look forward to our work ahead together to implement this transformative program in communities across California.”

CARE Court is bolstered by the state’s $15.3 billion in funding to tackle homelessness and $11.6 billion annually in mental health services
 
CARE Court will be implemented statewide and will start with a phased-in approach. The first cohort to implement CARE Court includes the counties of Glenn, Orange, Riverside, San Diego, Stanislaus, Tuolumne and San Francisco.

Governor Newsom signs CARE Court into law alongside state and local leaders, stakeholders
(Photo Credit: Office of the Governor)

CARE Court received bipartisan and near-unanimous approval in both the state Senate and Assembly. The framework is supported by unprecedented funding under the state’s $15.3 billion investment in addressing homelessness, including $1.5 billion for behavioral bridge housing; more than $11.6 billion annually for mental health programs throughout California; and more than $1.4 billion for our health and human services workforce. An additional $88.3 million in CARE Court start-up funds was provided for the state, counties, courts, self-help and legal aid.
 
“I have seen first-hand the good that can come when our judicial, executive, and legislative branches work together to address delicate populations and nuanced issues like mental health, veterans, at-risk youth, and substance use,” said Senator Thomas J. Umberg (D-Santa Ana). “The individual frameworks and best practices for collaboration exist here – and we pulled them together in SB 1338 for something new and revolutionary in California. I’m proud to have been able to spearhead this effort with Senator Eggman and look forward to more advances in the years ahead.”
 
“It is an inescapable conclusion – with the evidence observable in community after community in California – that our behavioral health system is broken and has allowed too many people with severe mental illness to fall through the cracks,” said Senator Susan Talamantes Eggman (D-Stockton). “The crisis is playing out on our streets and Californians want an answer to the crisis of conscience we all feel when we see this suffering firsthand. The CARE Act provides a critical new on-ramp into the behavioral health system for a population of people that are the hardest to reach. Basic human dignity requires us to put our full effort into helping get care for people struggling with severe mental illness on our streets. I applaud Governor Newsom and Secretary Ghaly for their leadership in crafting this bold and much needed reform. And I want to thank my colleague Senator Umberg for the strong partnership in shepherding the CARE Act through the legislature.”
 
CARE Court was created based on the evidence that people with untreated psychosis can be stabilized and housed in community-based care settings, with treatment and support. The plan focuses on people with schizophrenia spectrum and other psychotic disorders, who may also have substance use challenges. 

(Photo Credit: Office of the Governor)


“The CARE Act recognizes that to serve those with the most complex behavioral health conditions, we must do the hard work of prioritizing those who need help the most, providing a comprehensive CARE plan that honors self-determination to the greatest extent possible, and holding ourselves accountable to delivering services and housing that are key to long term stability and recovery,” said Secretary of the California Health & Human Services Agency, Dr. Mark Ghaly. “Today is significant and would not have been possible without the contributions of the many passionate and thoughtful individuals and organizations we have engaged with over the past many months to help craft this unprecedented and innovative legislation. On the shoulders of those who leaned in to get us to this point, we now shift our full energy to implementing the CARE Act program in counties across the state. Rolling up sleeves to collaborate, partner and plan so those who can benefit from this new pathway can do so as soon as possible.” 
 
CARE Court will provide individuals with clinically appropriate, community-based and court-ordered Care Plans consisting of culturally and linguistically competent county mental health and substance use disorder treatment services. These include short-term stabilization medications, wellness and recovery supports, social services and housing. Services are provided to the individual while they live in the community. Plans can be between 12-24 months. In addition to their full clinical team, the client-centered approach also includes a volunteer supporter to help individuals make self-directed care decisions, and an attorney.
 
“NAMI stands proud to support the CARE Act and looks forward to seeing this legislation become a reality in every community throughout the state. CARE Court will be a lifeline to thousands of individuals across California looking for help to live a more fulfilling life,” said NAMI California CEO Jessica Cruz.
 
The CARE Court framework includes real accountability. Counties and other local governments could be issued fines by the court if they are out of compliance. That money will be placed in the CARE Act Accountability Fund and will be used to support the efforts of the local government entities that paid the fines to serve individuals. 

For more information, visit https://www.chhs.ca.gov/care-court/ 

California

Newsom to hold oil industry accountable for price gouging

Governor calls special session to pass price gouging penalty on oil companies, push new efforts to increase transparency & accountability

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Governor Newsom signs proclamation convening a special session to pass price gouging penalty on oil companies (Photo Credit: Office of the Governor)

SACRAMENTO – As oil companies continue to evade questions about unexplained gas price increases, Governor Gavin Newsom today convened a special session of the California Legislature on December 5 to pass a price gouging penalty on oil companies that will keep money in Californians’ pockets. 

The Governor’s action comes on the heels of a state hearing yesterday – which five major oil refiners refused to attend – to investigate this fall’s unprecedented spike in gasoline prices. This spike in gasoline prices resulted in record refiner profits of $63 billion in just 90 days, disproportionately affecting low- and middle-income families.

“Big oil is ripping Californians off, and the deafening silence from the industry yesterday is the latest proof that a price gouging penalty is needed to hold them accountable for profiteering at the expense of California families,” said Newsom. “I’m calling a special session of the Legislature to do just that, and to increase transparency on pricing and protect Californians from outrageous price spikes in the future.”

This fall’s spike occurred while crude oil prices dropped, state taxes and fees remained unchanged and gas prices did not increase outside the western U.S., so the high prices went straight to the industry’s bottom line.

During the special session, the Legislature will also consider efforts to empower state agencies to more closely review gas costs, profits and pricing as well provide the state with greater regulatory oversight of the refining, distribution and retailing segments of the gasoline market in California.

Taking action to lower prices at the pump, Governor Newsom in September ordered the switch to winter-blend gasoline and demanded accountability from oil companies and refiners that do business in California. Since California’s record-high gas prices of $6.42, the Governor’s actions have reduced those prices to $4.95 most recently – a decrease of $1.47 since the peak.

In the third quarter of 2022, from July to September, oil companies reported record high profits:

The text of the Governor’s proclamation convening a special session can be found here. 

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CHP increases efforts to combat organized retail theft for holidays

California Highway Patrol to saturate shopping centers throughout the state working with local law enforcement to make arrests

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Photo Credit: California Highway Patrol public affairs

SACRAMENTO – Governor Gavin Newsom has increased efforts statewide to tackle organized retail theft ahead of the holiday shopping season. The California Highway Patrol (CHP) Organized Retail Crime Task Force (ORCTF) is increasing their presence at shopping centers throughout the state and working with local law enforcement agencies to make arrests and heighten visibility. 

“Californians deserve to feel safe especially as they head to stores this holiday season,” said Newsom. “We’ve doubled down on our efforts to combat crime with millions of dollars to deter, arrest and successfully prosecute criminals involved in organized retail theft. This year, shopping centers across California will see saturated patrols as CHP regional teams work with local law enforcement agencies to help make arrests and recover stolen merchandise.”

Governor Newsom signed Assembly Bill 331 by Assemblymember Reginald Byron Jones-Sawyer, Sr. (D-Los Angeles) to extend and expand the CHP’s Organized Retail Crime Task Force (ORCTF).

The CHP’s ORCTF regional teams collaborate with local law enforcement agencies and retailers to proactively address organized retail theft. Since the inception of the task force, the CHP has been involved in 1,296 investigations, the arrest of 645 suspects, and the recovery of 271,697 items of stolen retail merchandise valued at nearly $26 million.

“The CHP is dedicated to ensuring everyone is safe during this holiday shopping season,” said Commissioner Amanda Ray. “Through the joint efforts of our Organized Retail Crime Task Force and public safety partners, we are working hard to combat organized retail crime and deter organized theft rings.”

CHP Organized Retail Crime Task Force investigators intercepted a shipment of stolen Lululemon products shipped from various places throughout the country, including Ohio, Illinois, and Wisconsin. The 1,861 items were worth approximately $200,000. The merchandise was returned to Lululemon in June of 2022.
(Photo Credit: California Highway Patrol)

Actions taken by Governor Gavin Newsom that prioritized combating organized retail theft:

  • Signed AB 331, extending the ORCTF sunset provision and investing $6 million annually in 2022-23 through 2024-25 and ongoing resources to provide a total of $15 million annually to expand and make permanent this task force.
  • Investing $255 million in grants for local law enforcement over the next three years to combat retail theft.
  • Providing $30 million over the next three years to support District Attorneys, effectively prosecuting theft-related crimes.
  • Funding the creation of a new unit, in the Attorney General’s office, with specialized investigators and prosecutors focused specifically on organized theft rings.

In addition to law enforcement investigating retail theft, legislation signed this year by Governor Newsom will make it harder for individuals to sell stolen merchandise online.

SB 301 by Senator Nancy Skinner (D-Berkeley), requires high-volume third-party sellers of merchandise to provide additional information to protect consumers, to include requiring online marketplaces to comply with specified recordkeeping and security procedures. And AB 1700 by Assemblymember Brian Maienschein (D-San Diego), requires the Attorney General’s Office to establish on its website a place for the public to report suspected stolen goods found on online marketplaces. 

Both bills take effect on January 1, 2023. 

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Newsom pauses funding on homeless initiatives, asks ‘do better’

Project Roomkey has sheltered more than 60,000 people since the pandemic began, & Homekey has funded 12,500 units since late 2020

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Governor Gavin Newsom earlier this summer assisting in a homeless encampment event in LA (Photo Credit: Office of the Governor)

SACRAMENTO – Governor Gavin Newsom announced Thursday that he will convene local leaders in mid-November to review the state’s collective approach to homelessness and identify new strategies to better address the growing homelessness crisis.

Until this convening, the state will hold on providing the remaining third round of Homelessness Housing, Assistance and Prevention (HHAP) grants.

“Californians demand accountability and results, not settling for the status quo,” said the Governor. “As a state, we are failing to meet the urgency of this moment. Collectively, these plans set a goal to reduce street homelessness 2% statewide by 2024. At this pace, it would take decades to significantly curb homelessness in California – this approach is simply unacceptable. Everyone has to do better – cities, counties, and the state included. We are all in this together.” 

The Governor is calling all local jurisdictions together for a meeting in mid-November to coordinate on an approach that will deliver more substantial results as opposed to current plans which result in just a 2% decrease of homelessness over four years statewide.

While some plans show local leaders taking aggressive action to combat homelessness, others are less ambitious – some plans even reflect double-digit increases in homelessness over four years.

The Governor’s calling all local jurisdictions together for the mid-November meeting is hoped to coordinate on an approach that will deliver more substantial results. This meeting will be an opportunity to learn from one another about what works, as well as to identify barriers that inhibit the progress we all want to make and strategies to remove them.

The third round of HHAP grants provides a share of $1 billion to every county, Continuum of Care, and the 13 largest cities in the state, on the condition that each local government has a plan approved by the state that reduces the number of unsheltered homeless individuals and increases permanent housing.

The state has so far provided over $1.5 billion of flexible emergency aid to address homelessness through the Homeless Emergency Aid Program and the first two rounds of HHAP funding.

Now, for the first time, recipients of the third round of HHAP funding have new requirements and must create a Homelessness Action Plan that addresses, in detail, local actions to prevent and reduce the number of individuals experiencing homelessness at the community level.

The plans must include a landscape analysis that assesses the current number of people experiencing homelessness in a given community and identify all existing programs, and all sources of funding aimed at tackling this crisis. Additionally, the plans must include outcome-driven results and strategies for achieving these goals using clear metrics to track success. 

The HHAP program is part of a $15.3 billion, multi-year state effort to turn the tide on homelessness – an all-of-the-above approach that includes cutting red tape and funding the largest expansion of homeless housing in California history.

The Governor’s office pin a released statement pointed out that the governor has taken unprecedented steps to address homelessness and housing statewide, providing local governments more money than ever before to address this crisis.

Groundbreaking programs like Homekey and Project Roomkey have become national models for getting people off the streets, faster than ever before and at a fraction of the usual cost.

In partnership with cities and counties throughout the state, Project Roomkey has sheltered more than 60,000 people since the pandemic began, and Homekey has funded 12,500 units since its inception in late 2020. 

Additionally, since September 1, 2021, Caltrans has cleared over 1,600 homeless encampments statewide, cleaning up 2,227 tons of trash, enough to fill more than 40 Olympic-sized swimming pools.

The state budget Governor Newsom signed earlier this year includes $700 million for encampment resolution grants with $350 million earmarked for assisting those living on state right-of-way property.

Also, through Clean California, the Governor has invested $1.1 billion to revitalize streets and public spaces through litter abatement and local beautification projects – generating an estimated 10,000 jobs, including for people exiting homelessness, at-risk youth, veterans, formerly incarcerated people, local artists and students.

From KTLA:

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Newsom & California Museum announce 15th Calif. Hall of Fame

The California Hall of Fame celebrates Californians whose achievements have made history and changed the state, the nation and the world

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Governor Gavin Newsom and First Partner Jennifer Siebel Newsom (Screenshot/YouTube)

SACRAMENTO – Today, Governor Gavin Newsom and First Partner Jennifer Siebel Newsom joined the California Museum in announcing the 15th class of inductees into the California Hall of Fame. The new inductees join 138 inspirational Californians previously inducted for embodying the state’s innovative spirit.

The California Hall of Fame celebrates Californians whose achievements have made history and changed the state, the nation and the world. Launched in 2006, the program serves as the California Museum’s annual gala and the premise of on-site and online exhibitions inspiring visitors to make a mark on history.

The inductees of the California Hall of Fame 15th class are:

Actor and singer-songwriter Lynda Carter

Chef Roy Choi

Physicist Steven Chu

Ice skater Peggy Fleming

Sociologist Arlie Russell Hochschild

Choreographer Alonzo King

Teacher and former astronaut Barbara Morgan

Out Soccer player Megan Rapinoe

Singer Linda Ronstadt

Artist Ed Ruscha

Band Los Tigres del Norte

“These phenomenal individuals are proof that the California dream is alive and well,” said Governor Newsom. “Jennifer and I are excited to induct the 15th class of leaders, dreamers, and innovators into the California Hall of Fame and celebrate these Californians who broke down barriers and reimagined what was possible.”

“The Governor and I are honored to welcome this new group of changemakers and trailblazers into the California Hall of Fame,” said First Partner Siebel Newsom. “With its cultural richness, innovative spirit, and leadership mindset, California is California because of phenomenal individuals like this year’s inductees. They have been – and will continue to be – immensely inspiring to us all.”

The California Hall of Fame launched in 2006 to honor trailblazing Californians who embody the state’s spirit of innovation and have made history. Inductees are selected annually by the Governor and First Partner for achievements in Arts, Business and Labor, Entertainment, Food and Wine, Literature, Music, Public Service, Science and Sports. This year marks the return of an in-person ceremony following the induction of a virtual class during the pandemic.

“We’re thrilled to join the Governor and First Partner in celebrating these remarkable Californians,” said California Museum Board of Trustees Chair Anne-Marie Petrie. “Their achievements will inspire thousands of Museum visitors in the year ahead to pursue their own dreams.”

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More oil companies made massive profits as Californians paid more

“Big oil is making record profits by ripping off Californians with refiners Phillips 66 & Marathon profits up to 1243% higher than last year”

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Screenshot/YouTube

Editor’s note: The following is a statement provided by Governor Newsom’s office:

SACRAMENTO – As gas price hikes hit Californians at the pump, oil companies and their refinery operations made record profits in only three months from July to September: 

Phillips 66 and Marathon operate refineries in the state that have raised costs on Californians despite the cost of crude declining, blaming such increases on refinery maintenance and other issues.

This follows Valero’s $2.82 billion in profits that were 500% higher than the year before, PBF Energy’s $1.06 billion that was 1700% higher than the year before, Shell’s $9.45 billion haul that sent $4 billion to shareholders for stock buybacksExxon’s highest-ever $19.7 billion in profits, and Chevron’s $11.2 billion in profits.

“Big oil is making record profits by ripping off Californians. They said high prices were because of war, state taxes and maintenance, but now we know that was all a facade – these high prices went straight to their bottom line,” said Governor Newsom. “A price gouging penalty will put these windfall profits back in the pockets of Californians.”

Following these record-breaking Q3 profits, big oil executives seem to be acknowledging the need to put money into the pockets of consumers. While Shell directly acknowledged it, Exxon did so in their own special, out-of-touch way:

  • Shell CEO: “I think we should be prepared and accept that our industry will be looked at for raising taxes in order to fund the transfers to those who need it most.”
  • Exxon CEO: “There has been discussion in the US about our industry returning some of our profits directly to the American people. That’s exactly what we’re doing in the form of our quarterly dividend.”

This comes on the heels of a report showing that refiners like PBF Energy are making more profits off of Californians than in any other state – $0.78 per gallon compared to the national average of $0.50, a 56% differential. According to Consumer Watchdog, “PBF reported making 78 cents per gallon refining crude oil into gasoline in California in the third quarter – the greatest raw profits anywhere in the nation or world. By contrast, PBF’s profits per gallon were 48 cents on the Gulf Coast, 49 cents per gallon on the East Coast, 55 cents per gallon in the Midwest – an average of 50 cents across the rest of America.”

Big oil was making these record profits at a time when Californians were seeing gas price hikes at the pump, despite the fact that the cost of crude oil was down:

Governor Newsom has taken action to lower prices at the pump, ordering the switch to winter-blend gasoline and demanding accountability from oil companies and refiners that do business in California, leading to record relief at the pump for consumers. Since California’s record-high gas prices of $6.42, the Governor’s actions have reduced those prices to $5.54 most recently – a decrease of 88 cents.

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Exxon & Chevron record profits: Gas price gouging hit Californians

Exxon made $19.7 billion from July to September, more profit than ever before in its history, while Chevron reported profits at $11.2 billion

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Screenshot/YouTube (Yahoo Finance)

Editor’s note: The following is a statement provided by Governor Newsom’s office:

SACRAMENTO – From July to September alone, Exxon and Chevron reported Q3 profits of $30.9 billion, all while Californians were paying higher gas prices despite the cost of crude oil being down. For Exxon, the $19.7 billion is the highest quarterly profits in its history, while Chevron’s $11.2 billion were its second-highest in history.

This follows Valero’s $2.82 billion in profits that were 500% higher than the year before, PBF Energy’s $1.06 billion that was 1700% higher than the year before, and Shell’s $9.45 billion haul that sent $4 billion to shareholders for stock buybacks.

“As Californians were getting ripped off at the pump, big oil companies like Exxon were making record profits – literally the most ever in a single quarter. Oil companies said high prices were because of war, state taxes, and maintenance, but now we know that was all a facade – these high prices went straight to their bottom line. It could not be more clear that a price gouging penalty is needed to hold big oil accountable and put those profits in the pockets of Californians,” said Governor Gavin Newsom.

Following these record-breaking Q3 profits, big oil executives seem to be acknowledging the need to put money into the pockets of consumers. While Shell directly acknowledged it, Exxon did it in their own special, out-of-touch way:

  • Shell CEO: “I think we should be prepared and accept that our industry will be looked at for raising taxes in order to fund the transfers to those who need it most.”
  • Exxon CEO: “There has been discussion in the US about our industry returning some of our profits directly to the American people. That’s exactly what we’re doing in the form of our quarterly dividend.”

This comes on the heels of a report showing that refiners like PBF energy are making more profits off of Californians than any other state – $0.78 per gallon compared to the national average of $0.50, a 56% differential: 

“PBF reported making 78 cents per gallon refining crude oil into gasoline in California in the third quarter – the greatest raw profits anywhere in the nation or world. By contrast, PBF’s profits per gallon were 48 cents on the Gulf Coast, 49 cents per gallon on the East Coast, 55 cents per gallon in the Midwest – an average of 50 cents across the rest of America.”

Big oil was making these record profits at a time when Californians were seeing gas price hikes at the pump, despite the fact that the cost of crude oil was down:


Governor Newsom has taken action to lower prices at the pump, ordering the switch to winter-blend gasoline and demanding accountability from oil companies and refiners that do business in California, leading to record relief at the pump for consumers. Since California’s record high gas prices of $6.42, the Governor’s actions have reduced those prices to $5.62 most recently – a decrease of 80 cents.

Exxon, Chevron are ‘cash bulls’ on earnings, analyst says:

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Californians charged more per gallon than any other state

Record profits came as Californians saw price hikes at the pump despite the cost of crude oil going down and no change in state taxes or fees

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Screenshot/YouTube Sky News UK

Editor’s note: The following is a statement provided by Governor Newsom’s office:

SACRAMENTO – Today’s Q3 reports by PBF Energy and Shell show once again that oil companies are overcharging Californians while making record profits. 

“Big oil is ripping people off at the pump, and they’re making more in profits off of Californians than in any other state – that’s why we need a price gouging penalty to hold them accountable and get these profits into your pockets,” said Governor Gavin Newsom.

According to PBF Energy’s Q3 financial report, the refining company’s profit jumped from $59.1 million at this time last year to $1.06 billion – an increase of nearly 1700%. And, Shell increased profits from $4.1 billion last year to $9.45 billion, with $4 billion going toward stock buybacks that benefit Wall Street shareholders.

According to a report from Consumer Watchdog, PBF Energy makes 56% more in profits off of Californians compared to the rest of the nation

“PBF reported making 78 cents per gallon refining crude oil into gasoline in California in the third quarter – the greatest raw profits anywhere in the nation or world. By contrast, PBF’s profits per gallon were 48 cents on the Gulf Coast, 49 cents per gallon on the East Coast, 55 cents per gallon in the Midwest – an average of 50 cents across the rest of America.

Earlier this week, Valero also posted record profits, up more than 500% to $2.82 billion compared to the year prior at $463 million. 

These record profits came as Californians saw price hikes at the pump despite the cost of crude oil going down and no change in state taxes or fees. Instead, the cost of gasoline skyrocketed purely because refineries wanted to put more in their own pockets:

 

Governor Newsom has taken action to lower prices at the pump, ordering the switch to winter-blend gasoline and demanding accountability from oil companies and refiners that do business in California, leading to record relief at the pump for consumers.

Since California’s record high gas prices of $6.42, the Governor’s actions have reduced those prices to $5.64 most recently – a decrease of 78 cents.

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Valero Energy profits more than 500% higher than a year ago

Big oil hiked gas prices despite crude costs going down resulting in higher prices for consumers & record profits for oil companies

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Valero Energy/Facebook

Editor’s note: The following is a statement provided by Governor Newsom’s office:

SACRAMENTO – According to Valero’s Q3 financial report, the oil company made $2.82 billion from July to September, which is up from $463 million a year ago – an increase of more than 500%. These profits came amidst a record gas price hike on consumers during that time period, despite crude oil prices having gone down.

From April to June of this year, Valero posted Q2 profits of $4.7 billion – a 2,801% increase compared to a year earlier. These record profits come as gas prices have surged for consumers this year compared to last year. So far this year, Valero has made $8.3 billion in profits.

“Big oil is ripping Californians off, hiking gas prices and making record profits. As Valero jacked up their profits by over 500% in just a year, Californians were paying for it at the pump instead of passing down those savings,” said California Governor Gavin Newsom. “That’s why we’re taking action to implement a price gouging penalty to put these profits back in the pockets of Californians.”

The remaining oil companies are expected to release their profit reports in the coming weeks.

Newsom has taken action to lower prices at the pump, ordering the switch to winter-blend gasoline and demanding accountability from oil companies and refiners that do business in California, leading to record relief at the pump for consumers. Since California’s record high gas prices of $6.42, the Governor’s actions have reduced those prices to $5.71 most recently.

During Q3, the margins for oil companies surged in California, despite crude oil prices and state taxes/fees going down – accounting for the largest share of the cost of gasoline:

Additionally, during Q3, oil companies hiked the price of gas on consumers despite crude oil going down: 

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Newsom inducts inaugural #CaliforniansForAll College Corps

This first-of-its-kind initiative provides undergraduate students at 46 colleges & universities across Calif. the opportunity to earn $10,000

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Gov. Newsom joins CSO Josh Fryday & higher education leaders at College Corps (Photo Credit: Office of the Governor)

SACRAMENTO – Governor Gavin Newsom, alongside California Chief Service Officer Josh Fryday and higher education leaders, swore in the first class of #CaliforniansForAll College Corps Fellows on Friday, with more than 3,200 students pledging to serve communities across the state while earning money to pay for college.
 
“The #CaliforniansForAll College Corps proves the point that you don’t have to be something to do something,” said Governor Newsom. “Leadership can be found anywhere, and this program creates a new path for students from all backgrounds to make a real impact in our communities while earning money for college. I’m humbled and proud to join these young leaders today and look forward to what they’ll accomplish on this remarkable journey.”
 
This first-of-its-kind initiative provides undergraduate students at 46 colleges and universities across California the opportunity to earn $10,000 for committing to one year of service focused on three key issue areas for the state: K-12 education, climate action and food insecurity.

“In California, if you are willing to serve your community and give back in a meaningful way, we are going to help you pay for college. This is a win-win-win: Helping to pay for college, gaining valuable work experience, and having a meaningful impact on your community,” said California Chief Service Officer Josh Fryday.

In this first cohort, more than two-thirds of Fellows are Pell-eligible, and 64% are first-generation college students. AB 540 CA Dream Act students are also eligible to earn support for college through this program. Approximately 13,000 students over the next four years will take part in a year of service, providing nearly 6 million hours of service to our California communities. 
 
College Corps Fellows will be placed with more than 600 community partner organizations across the state. Fellows in K-12 education will serve as tutors or mentors to public school students. Many Fellows will be placed directly in classrooms in school districts across the state, while others will support after-school programs run by non-profit organizations. Fellows tackling food insecurity will be placed with numerous food banks in addition to staffing food pantries on their own college or university campus. Fellows focused on climate action will plant trees, assist in wildfire mitigation work and support a variety of environmental education and community outreach efforts.
 
In 2020, Governor Newsom launched California Climate Action Corps, the country’s first statewide climate corps, with the mission of empowering Californians to protect their communities from the impacts of climate change. Both the Climate Action Corps and College Corps provide opportunities for volunteers to give back to underserved communities throughout California. 
 
The #CaliforniansForAll College Corps is primarily funded through the California Comeback Plan and will support 3,250 students in the first year of this program. 

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Newsom calls out gas companies, says they’re fleecing Californians

The governor announced oil refineries could roll out winter-blend gas ahead of schedule, which could reduce price up to 25 cents per gallon

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Screenshot/Twitter

SACRAMENTO – On Friday California Governor Gavin Newsom in a scathing video on his Twitter account castigated oil and gas companies for what he termed fleecing consumers in the Golden State.

“Oil companies are ripping you off. Their record profits are coming at your expense at the pump,” the Governor said. “I’m calling for a NEW windfall tax exclusively on oil companies. If they won’t lower their prices we will do it for them. The money will go directly back to you.”

According to the Triple A Auto club of Southern California, gas prices statewide crept up yet again overnight, reaching an average of $6.36/gallon for regular unleaded Saturday.

In the Los Angeles area, gasoline hit $6.45/gallon, up 7 cents from the day before. Ongoing Southern California fuel supply issues pushed Los Angeles wholesale gasoline prices to new records this week and pump prices may also break new records soon if they keep increasing at the current pace of 10-15 cents a day.

The average price for self-serve regular gasoline in California is $6.18, which is 66 cents higher than last week. The average national price is $3.78, which is ten cents higher than a week ago.

“The degree of diversions from the national prices has never happened before, and oil companies provide no explanation,” Newsom said. “We’re not going to stand by while greedy oil companies fleece Californians.”

The average price of self-serve regular gasoline in the Los Angeles-Long Beach area is $6.26 per gallon, which is 67 cents higher than last week, 98 cents higher than last month, and $1.85 higher than last year. In San Diego, the average price is $6.20, which is 67 cents higher than last week, 96 cents higher than last month, and $1.85 higher than last year.

California Gas Prices vs. National Average

CaliforniaNationwide
Saturday, Oct 1. = $6.358/gallonSaturday, Oct 1. = $3.80/gallon
Friday = $6.293Friday = $3.797
Week Ago = $5.682Week Ago = $3.700
Month Ago = $5.252Month Ago = $3.829
Source: AAA

The governor also announced on Friday that oil refineries could roll out winter-blend gasoline ahead of schedule, which could reduce the price of gas up to 25 cents per gallon.

“In light of the dramatic increase in gas prices that California is experiencing, we should not wait until the end of the month to start distributing or to ramp up production of our winter-blend gasoline. Allowing refiners to make an early transition to winter-blend gasoline could quickly increase fuel supply and provide a much needed safety valve with minimal air quality impacts,” Newsom said in a letter to Liane Randolph, chair of the California Air Resources Board. “Accordingly, I am directing that the Air Resources Board immediately take whatever steps are necessary to allow for an early transition to gasoline to be manufactured, imported, distributed, and sold in California.”

Switching from the summer to winter blend would likely save consumers 15 to 20 cents per gallon, said Doug Shupe, a spokesman for the Southern California Automobile Club said.

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