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LA fashion house of August Getty Atelier brings diversity

“My clothing is for everyone, every shape, every size, every walk of life. People always ask me, “Where would I wear that to?!”

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August Getty Photo by Yudo Kurita

CULVER CITY – When August Getty took the microphone at the Los Angeles Blade’s Next Generation of Pride last month, his voice was gravely but his pride was beaming out.  Not only was he there to represent the Ariadne Getty Foundation, a sponsor of the event and a key supporter of the Los Angeles Blade, but he was there, entourage in tow, living it out loud and proud.

The night before, at a luxe private event in Los Angeles, Getty not only celebrated his birthday but the presentation of a years in the making fashion line, a vision he calls TINITUS. It’s a vision that he has expressed as his own gender non-conforming journey has taken him on a spiritual path, and that journey is part of what TINITUS deals with.

August Getty Atelier launched in 2014 during New York Fashion week, and has been on the rise ever since. Since his standout debut, Getty’s fashion has been seen on the world’s most exclusive red carpets – The Oscars, The Met Gala and more – and he has dressed some of the hottest celebrities including Zendaya, Kim Kardashian, Paris Hilton, Miley Cyrus and Katy Perry – to name a few. 

“My clothing is for everyone, every shape, every size, every walk of life. People always ask me, “Where would I wear that to?!” I simply reply, “Starbucks,” Getty told the Los Angeles Blade a week after the successful launch of TINITUS his most recent collection.

Getty’s most recent collection, TINITUS was showcased virtually during Paris Fashion Week in March 2021. Digital renderings of his haute couture gowns floated above surreal alien worlds, created in a partnership with the Institute of Digital Fashion, a London-based digital content group. TINITUS was officially launched on July 7th with a stunning collection of photos taken by prolific fashion photographer Ellen von Unwerth.

One of the models, August Getty’s sister-in-law Gigi Gorgeous Getty, is especially resplendent in a stunning floor-length skirt and beaded top. Gigi Gorgeous Getty coincidentally met her future husband, August’s brother Nats Getty, at a Paris Fashion Week event for August Getty Atelier. 

Taking time off from his idyllic vacation in Italy, August Getty chatted with the Blade about TINITUS, Miami drag and wearing couture to Starbucks.

What inspired the name for the collection, TINITUS?

The collection being named TINITUS came very easily to me. I wanted a name that described a personal moment of self-acceptance and transformation—where darkness turns to light. The name comes from the word “tinnitus,” which is a hearing condition I share with a very close loved one in my life. It’s a constant ringing in the ear—but instead of viewing in a dark way, I choose to view it beautifully. 

What inspirations did you pull from to create the collection?

I pulled inspirations from many places for TINITUS, from English mythology to Salvador Dali paintings. I needed this world to be a treasure chest of artistic references. An important part of this process was looking at something that’s abstract and make sense of it in my own life, art, and vision. In some of the garments, you may even see imagery reminding you of some of my past collections. This was to evoke the feeling of familiarity and yet positive change.

What was the largest challenge in creating TINITUS?

The hardest part was entering a digital space where I had to give complete trust to our collaborators, I was entering their world while creating my own. The experience turned out to be quite remarkable. I learned a lot about both patience and trust, and I am forever grateful. I’ve applied the things that I’ve learned further into our company and into our own website.

How does TINITUS relate to your previous collections? 

A common thread between each of my collections is my craft of storytelling. Every collection is very different from the last but with detailed elements which keep the DNA of our atelier evolving. Throughout my previous work, there has also been the reference of the infamous “Getty Girl,”  a polarizing mystical being that surpasses time. This collection was different. This story is less surreal and is something more relatable and personal to everyone, not just myself.

Who do you design clothes for? Is there an abstract customer or client you create for?

My clothing is for everyone, every shape, every size, every walk of life. People always ask me, “Where would I wear that to?!” I simply reply, “Starbucks.” My personal journey through gender and coming out as non-binary has taught me so much, and it has made my work and my demand for inclusively that much louder. 

Where do you hope to take August Getty Atelier next?

Oh my gosh, I just finished my collection! Let me sit down for a moment!  I’m just kidding, I am already working our next collection for Paris Haute Couture Week next fall. You’ll have to wait and see though—I’m sworn to secrecy.

Tell us about the casting process for modeling – who do you choose to rep your work and why?

The model casting is such a fond memory of mine. Something that photographer Ellen von Unwerth and I wanted to evoke was personality and passion, so it was important to select a diverse cast who embodied this. I invited Ellen to The Palace, a very well-known drag bar in Miami. I introduced her to my friends, and she watched them perform. I think she was quite amazed, and we couldn’t stop smiling. All our models are so incredible, and we remain close. 

The collection has a beautiful story of self-acceptance, what compelled you to spotlight that?

Self-acceptance—and acceptance overall—is something the world needs, and especially with the tough year in 2020, I needed to do my part. To use my craft and hopefully show just one person that they are not alone, to let people know they’re going to be okay. I’ve been there, I’m still there, but now we have each other. 

Biggest design influence? Who inspires you?

You do, our beautiful LGBTQIAA+ community. 

Photo by Ellen von Unwerth for August Getty Atelier


To learn more, visit www.augustgetty.com. Instagram @augustgettyatelier.

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Vlogger StanChris; My religious mom reacts to Norway’s “gay Santa” ad

My religious mom reacts to Norway’s gay Santa advertisement! Let’s see what she has to say about it.

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Screenshot via YouTube

LOS ANGELES – The twenty-something StanChris, the Out YouTuber who has been building his audience on his YouTube channel by vlogging about the ordinary everyday experiences of his life as a young gay guy is back- this time interviewing his mother.

My religious mom reacts to Norway’s gay Santa advertisement! Let’s see what she has to say about it.

My religious mom reacts to Norway’s “gay Santa” ad

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S O C I A L – L I N K S

→Instagram : stanchris https://instagram.com/stanchris

→ Twitter : stanchrisss https://twitter.com/stanchrisss

Subscribe here!!: https://youtube.com/c/stanchris

Watch more: https://youtu.be/rjI4c7nSXkw

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Online Culture

Critics call gay Santa ad ‘creepy’ accusing it of ‘sexualizing’ Christmas

The ad was posted to Youtube on November 22 to pay tribute to the 50th anniversary of Norway’s decision to decriminalize homosexuality 

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Courtesy of Norway’s postal service, Posten Norge

OSLO – A Norwegian Christmas ad for Norway’s postal service, Posten Norge, that depicts a gay Santa struggling to balance his Christmas day duties and a male love interest has sparked an online debate with critics saying it “sexualizes” the holiday figure. 

The ad, titled “When Harry met Santa,” shows a burgeoning romance between Santa and Harry that starts when the two meet one Christmas Eve. As leaves the house through the chimney that night, fireworks fill the night sky. 

Over the years, the two continue to see each other on Christmas Eve and fall in love. Frustrated with only getting to see his lover once a year, Harry pens a letter to Santa that says, “Dear Santa: All I want for Christmas is you.”

At the end of the nearly 4-minute ad, Santa and his lover engage in a seconds-long kiss. During their embrace, the camera pans out and a message that reads, “In 2022, Norway marks 50 years of being able to love who we want,” appears. 

The ad, posted to Youtube on November 22 to pay tribute to the 50th anniversary of Norway’s decision to decriminalize homosexuality, has garnered over 1 million views. 

“In addition to showing the flexibility of our services, we want to put it in a socially relevant setting,” Posten Norge said in a statement, according to Reuters

“Everyone should feel welcome, seen, heard, and included. This year’s Christmas ad embraces this,” it said.

Many have responded positively to the ad. 

Canadian Member of Parliament Randall Garrison called it “strong and moving,” saying the ad caused him to break his “no Xmas before December rule.”

Former U.S. ambassador to Denmark Rufus Gifford tweeted: “Oh man I love Scandinavia. Imagine if the US Post Office put out an ad like this.”

Others have voiced issues with the ad, calling it “creepy” and arguing that it “sexualizes” Santa.

English journalist Dawn Neesom, a columnist for the Daily Star, said as much on TalkRadio with James Max. 

“This is an advert for the Norwegian postal service celebrating 50 years of being able to love who you want. However, they have sexualized Santa,” Neesom said.

Max interrupted her, saying, “No they haven’t sexualized Santa, this is a nonsense and you are jumping on a tabloid bandwagon. If Santa came in and kissed Mrs. Claus, you wouldn’t say a word.”

Neesom pushed back and maintained her point, adding that it was different because Santa married Mrs. Claus. She also argued that Harry was cheating on his spouse, but there is no indication in the ad that he has one. 

Commentator Melanie Blake made a similar argument, tweeting: “If #Santa is gay these days then good for him but should we be seeing him getting off with anyone in Christmas adverts?! Seems a bit of an odd concept to me – if he was snogging a woman, it’s still sexualising a figure that’s mainly around for children which looks creepy to me.”

In response to such comments, the Independent published an article that said, “Really? I mean … really?! Now, I know that woke-bashing has become de rigueur, and that, after the backlashes against the #MeToo and BLM campaigns, we’re supposed to protect our precious and delicate cultural icons from the clutches of the baying woke mob – but are we really saying that the heartwarming romance between Harry and Santa is a woke step too far? Has Posten sexualised Santa? Oh, go and stuff your face with a selection box and give it a rest!”

It continued: “The truth is that Christmas and Santa have been sexualised for years already, and few people have batted an eye.”

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Vlogger StanChris asks “what it was like growing up with a gay brother?”

My straight little brother answers everyones questions about what it was like growing up and living with me before & after I came out

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Screenshot via YouTube

LOS ANGELES – The twenty-something StanChris, the Out YouTuber who has been building his audience on his YouTube channel by vlogging about the ordinary everyday experiences of his life as a young gay guy, is back with his straight brother and his brother’s friend.

My straight little brother answers everyones questions about what it was like growing up and living with me before & after I came out along with some other fun misc. things…”

My straight little brother answers your questions about me

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S O C I A L – L I N K S

→Instagram : stanchris https://instagram.com/stanchris

→ Twitter : stanchrisss https://twitter.com/stanchrisss

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