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‘Gotham’ star’s missing trans daughter found safe, returned home

the 16-year-old had been away from home for two weeks

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Donal Logue, gay news, Washington Blade
Donal Logue, gay news, Washington Blade

(Photo via Wikimedia Commons.)

“Gotham” actor Donal Logue’s missing daughter has been located and returned safely home.

According to ABC News, the New York City Police Department found 16-year-old Jade in North Carolina “safe and sound.” Jade had been missing for almost two weeks and was last seen in New York City.

Logue and Jade’s mother Kasey Smith had both taken to social media to find Jade, who came out as transgender in 2016.

Logue also tweeted his thanks to the FBI and New York City Police Department for bringing Jade home.

“Thank you ALL for the love and support. We are good. Kasey and I wish to thank the NYPD. FBI, @MissingKids and countless others,” Logue tweeted.

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Notables

Pioneering trans computer scientist Lynn Conway dies at 86

If you are reading this on your mobile phone, you owe it to Conway who pioneered the microchip technology that makes it possible

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Lynn Conway, faculty headshot, University of Michigan by Charles Rogers and at Xerox Corp. by Margaret Moulton

By Erin Reed | ANN ARBOR, Mich. – Yesterday, news broke that transgender woman and computer pioneer Lynn Conway passed away at the age of 86. Her story is nothing short of remarkable.

Conway helped pioneer early supercomputers at IBM but was fired after she transitioned. She went “stealth” and had to rebuild her career from the ground up, starting as a contract programmer at Xerox with “no experience.”

Then, she did it all over again, pioneering VLSI—a groundbreaking technology that allowed for microchips to be made small enough to fit in your pocket, paving the way for smartphones and personal computers. In 1999, she broke stealth, becoming an outspoken advocate for transgender people.

Conway first attempted to transition at MIT in 1957 at the age of 19 years old. At the time, the environment was not accepting enough for transgender people to do so. She would have faced enormous barriers to medical transition, as few doctors were knowledgeable enough to prescribe hormone therapy a the time. Like many transgender people seeing enormous barriers to care, she spent the following years closeted.

Eventually, she was hired by IBM where she helped develop the world’s fastest supercomputer at the time on the Advanced Computing System (ACS) project. The computer would become the first to use a “superscalar” design, which made it capable of performing several tasks at once, dramatically improving its performance and making it much faster than previous computers. Despite her pivotal role in the project, she was fired when she informed her employer that she wanted to transition.

What she did next is nothing short of remarkable. Realizing that as an openly transgender woman in 1968, few companies would hire her, she went “stealth” and pretended she had no significant prior experience in computers.

She quickly advanced through the ranks and was hired by Xerox, where she famously developed VLSI, or Very Large Scale Integration. This groundbreaking technology allowed for thousands of transistors to be packed onto a single chip, revolutionizing electronics by making cell phones and modern computers possible through miniaturization and increased processing power.

Conway didn’t stop there. After gaining fame for her computer innovations, she came out in 1999 to advocate for transgender people. She was among the early critics of Dr. Kenneth Zucker, an anti-trans researcher still cited today by those working to ban gender-affirming care.

Conway slammed Zucker for practicing “reparative therapy,” a euphemism for conversion therapy. Notably, Zucker’s research continues to make false claims that “80% of transgender kids desist from being trans,” numbers based on his clinic’s practices, which closely mirrored gay conversion therapy. That clinic has since been shut down over those practices.

Often, those opposed to transgender people paint a picture of gender transition as something new, unique, or unsustainable. Similarly, many who transition are told they cannot be successful as transgender individuals.

Such claims are often weaponized by anti-trans activists like Matt Walsh, who once mockingly asked, “What exactly have ‘transgender Americans’ contributed?” Conway’s life was a resounding rebuke to these attacks. She attempted to transition at a young age in the 1950s, revolutionized computing twice from scratch, and made the cell phone Walsh likely used to post such a question possible.

Perhaps more importantly, Conway’s life gave transgender people another gift: a visible example that we can grow old, and a reminder that we have always been here. In a world where so many of us have had to hide in silence or stealth, where representation has been denied, and where we are told that our lives will be too dangerous to live, Conway proved that one can be trans and live a long, fulfilling, and proud life.

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Erin Reed is a transgender woman (she/her pronouns) and researcher who tracks anti-LGBTQ+ legislation around the world and helps people become better advocates for their queer family, friends, colleagues, and community. Reed also is a social media consultant and public speaker.

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The preceding article was first published at Erin In The Morning and is republished with permission.

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Events

Ricky Martin makes Pride debut at LA Pride in the Park

Martin entertained the crowd with live vocals and hip movements, and he serenaded his hardcore fans with several Spanish songs

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Ricky Martin performs at LA Pride in the Park – Photo by Mike Pingel for WEHO TIMES

By Paulo Murillo | LOS ANGELES – LA Pride kicked off a weekend-long celebration of Pride Month this past Saturday with Ricky Martin shaking his “bom bom” to a sea of fans at Los Angeles State Historic Park.

The event also featured performances by JoJo Siwa, RaiNao, Tokischa, MUNA, and cast members of HBO’s “We’re Here,” including Sasha Velour, Latrice Royale, Jaida Essence Hall, and Priyanka.

The LA Pride in the Park music festival, produced by Christopher Street West (CSW), a 501(c)(3) nonprofit established in 1970, spanned over 20 acres and featured a variety of activities, exhibitor booths, vendors, games, and food and drink options.

Ricky Martin performs at LA Pride in the Park – Photo by Mike Pingel for WEHO TIMES
Ricky Martin performs at LA Pride in the Park – Photo by Mike Pingel for WEHO TIMES
Ricky Martin performs at LA Pride in the Park – Photo by Mike Pingel for WEHO TIMES

Martin entertained the crowd with live vocals and hip movements, and he serenaded his hardcore fans with several Spanish songs, reminding those in attendance that his music career extends beyond “Livin’ La Vida Loca” in the U.S. to other Spanish-speaking countries.

According to reports, this year’s performance marks Martin’s first headlining appearance at any Pride event since he publicly came out as gay via his website in 2010. This year also marks him as the first openly gay Latin artist to perform center stage at LA Pride.

Ricky Martin performs at LA Pride in the Park – Photo by Mike Pingel for WEHO TIMES

Martin had a lot to prove with his LA Pride gig, following in the high-heeled footsteps of LGBTQ+ diva giants Christina Aguilera and Mariah Carey, who graced the LA Pride stage in the past two years.

This year’s theme, “Power in Pride,” celebrates the LGBTQ+ community’s ability to live authentically through strength and resilience.

Ricky Martin performs at LA Pride in the Park – Photo by Paulo Murillo for WEHO TIMES

“His participation in LA Pride in the Park goes beyond mere entertainment. It symbolizes a powerful affirmation of queer Latin identity and a celebration of diversity within the LGBTQ+ community,” said Gerald Garth, president of the Christopher Street West board, in a statement.

@wehotimes @Ricky Martin gave it his all as the headliner of this year’s @LA Pride music festival. Here he gyrates all over the place for Living La Vida Loca. #wehotimes #wehonews #lapride #pride #pridemonth #gaypride #lgbtpride #rickymartin #ricky ♬ original sound – WEHO TIMES

The event also included a “sober space” featuring games and activities, an Erotic City area with displays and appearances catering to the kink community, a sports section, and plenty of giveaways.

The LA Pride celebrations continued on Sunday with the LA Pride Parade through the streets of Hollywood, followed by a daylong street fair.

To learn more about LA Pride, visit: https://lapride.org/

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Paulo Murillo is Editor in Chief and Publisher of WEHO TIMES. He brings over 20 years of experience as a columnist, reporter, and photo journalist. Murillo began his professional writing career as the author of “Love Ya, Mean It,” an irreverent and sometimes controversial West Hollywood lifestyle column for FAB! newspaper. His work has appea

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The preceding article was previously published by WeHo Times and is republished with permission.

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Celebrity News

Christian writer apologizes for attacking LGBTQ+ ally Dolly Parton

Andersen, who self identifies as a Christian mom & Bible study leader, apologized for her attacking the Country Icon

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Country Icon, singer-songwriter and long time LGBTQ+ ally Dolly Parton. (Screenshot/YouTube Dolly Parton)

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. – Freelance writer Ericka Andersen, who self identifies as a Christian mom and Bible study leader, in an interview with Yahoo Entertainment apologized for her attacking Country Icon, singer-songwriter Dolly Parton over her allyship and advocacy for the LGBTQ+ community.

Indianapolis-based Andersen told Yahoo Entertainment on Saturday that the widespread backlash made her realize she shouldn’t have used Parton to press her argument. “I regret using Dolly as the example for the point I was making in the article,” she said.

“As I wrote in the piece, I love her and think she does some incredible things for the world. We all make poor choices in how to frame things sometimes. This was one of those moments for me! Dolly is one of the few people who is beloved by all and who loves all. The world is lucky to have her.”

In a piece for the far-right extremist magazine The Federalist, Andersen had written:

“In a world where division is the default, she collects fans of every political stripe, refusing to denigrate anyone, and regularly proclaims, “I love everybody,” when asked how she does it. 

This response is usually seen as a nod toward the LGBT alliance during interviews with media folks forever fixated on this particular group.”

Andersen then notes:

“When asked about her diverse community of fans, Parton always mentions Christianity, saying she does her best “not to judge” and only “to love” for that reason. 

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But Parton’s version of love, which includes condoning immoral sexual behavior (“be who you are,” she’s said), is unaligned with God’s vision for humanity. Like so many secularized spiritual leaders, Parton equates love with agreement, but the two are not reciprocal. Love doesn’t mean we must accept sinfulness as good to avoid hurting someone’s feelings.”

The Federalist was widely denounced on multiple social media platforms for its attack of the beloved Country Icon.

Paul Richmond, a Monterey, California-based queer artist and art instructor, who is an acquaintance of the singer and has created a couple of artwork pieces for Parton, was asked by the Blade for his reaction to the homophobic parsing of Parton’s character by the Federalist writer.

Richmond said: “There is nothing that exemplifies how desperate for attention and unhinged the far right has become than by this attack on America’s sweetheart. Dolly has always shown kindness and empathy for others, which is what all supposed Christians should be striving for.”

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Events

54th Annual LA PRIDE Parade Today! STEP OFF at 11AM

The LA Pride Parade and Block Party will take over the streets of Hollywood Sunday, continuing a two-day celebration of Pride Month

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LA Pride/Los Angeles Blade graphic

LOS ANGELES – (KABC) – HAPPENING TODAY! Come out to the 54th annual @lapride Parade in Hollywood! The parade’s grand marshals are “Star Trek” legend George Takei, LAFD Chief Kristin Crowley and legendary wrestler Cassandro El Exótico. 🏳️‍🌈Can’t make it? Watch it here at 11am: https://t.co/IlpUMCBBHj — ABC7 Eyewitness News (@ABC7) June 9, 2024

JUNE 9, 2024: STEP OFF at 11AM

The best Parade viewing spots are along the middle of Hollywood Blvd, or on Highland, opposite the ABC7 broadcast area. Step-off is at 11AM sharp, so get there early to get a good spot.

If you can’t be with there in person, be sure to watch the parade live on ABC7, LA Pride’s Official Television & Streaming Partner.

PARADE BLOCK PARTY

June 9, 2024
ADJACENT TO PARADE ROUTE HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD

We’re keeping the celebration going on Sunday by throwing the ultimate free Block Party adjacent to the Parade, open from mid-day and going into the evening. With a performance stage, large vendor village, food & bevs, pop-up bars, and more, it’s the place to be to after the Parade. Last year, 35,000 people enjoyed this free Parade “after-party,” don’t miss it!

The Block Party vendor booth application deadline has now passed. Stay tuned to learn more about the cool things we have in store!

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Movies

New Cyndi Lauper doc brings overdue spotlight to queer ally

‘Let the Canary Sing’ captures a unique, era-defining star

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Cyndi Lauper’s remarkable career is revisited in ‘Let the Canary Sing.’ (Photo courtesy of Paramount Plus)

Every era in our cultural memory has given rise to popular artists that helped to define them, but few can be said to have made as definitive an impact as Cyndi Lauper in the early ‘80s. Splashing onto our airwaves and across our television screens (courtesy of the newly minted MTV) with a defiantly upbeat and colorful blast of society-shifting energy, her proclamation that “Girls Just Want to Have Fun” caught the world off guard with a feminist anthem disguised as a good-time party song, and her sense of quirky punk style became an iconic influence over the “look” of an entire decade. In some ways, you could almost say Cyndi Lauper was the ‘80s.

For many people who grew up or came of age during her rise from unknown girl singer to pop music phenomenon, that might be the extent of their knowledge of her life and career. Despite the success (and Grammy Award) she achieved with her first few hits, the ever-roving eye of public attention inevitably moved on to the next new superstar, and her later efforts – while not exactly ignored – never managed to garner as much attention.

That doesn’t mean she has been inactive, though, as her die-hard fans (and there are many) well know; this is especially true in the queer community, where she has long been recognized and celebrated as a staunch ally – which is why it seems apt that Pride month should coincide with the release of “Let the Canary Sing,” a new documentary profile of Lauper that premieres on Paramount Plus this week.

Directed by Emmy-winning documentarian Alison Ellwood, “Canary” takes its name from a comment made by the judge in a legal case that opened the door for Lauper’s stardom – no spoilers here, you’ll have to watch the movie to find out more. It undertakes the telling of a well-rounded and comprehensive life story to cast that stardom in a new light. Maintaining a comfortable sense of chronology, it begins with Lauper’s childhood, growing up in Brooklyn (and later, Queens) in a close-knit family as the middle child of three with a divorced single mother, and follows the trajectory of her life – rebellious, risk-taking teen to driven, passionate artist and activist – through her love of music, her rise to fame, her struggle to evolve in an industry that rewards predictable familiarity, her emergence as an LGBTQ advocate, and her expansion into a genre-leaping artist whose reach has extended beyond pop culture to earn her renown for her versatility. It also covers her accomplishment as the first woman to win a Tony Award as sole composer of the music and lyrics of “Kinky Boots,” the Harvey Fierstein-scripted drag-themed Broadway musical which made a star of Billy Porter – and nabbed her another Grammy (for its Original Cast Recording), to boot. Bolstered by extensive current interview footage with Lauper herself, as well as elder sister Elen, younger brother Fred, and other important figures from her personal and professional life, it finds an arc that reveals its subject as an authentic and uncompromising visionary dedicated to “lifting up” the entire human race.

That would sound hyperbolic – and probably more than a little disingenuous – if Lauper did not come across so palpably on camera. Whether it’s footage from a decades-old Letterman show or newly filmed commentary shot specifically for the film, her “true colors” come shining through (forgive us for that one, we couldn’t resist) to provide ample evidence that, even if she didn’t always know where she was going, she always knew it would be the direction of her own choosing. Indeed, as the movie makes clear, much of the reason behind Lauper’s fade from the pop spotlight was the result of her refusal to repeat herself, to compromise her own path by delivering pale copies of the formula that had made her an “overnight success” after 15 years of trying. Although the documentary doesn’t insinuate this, it’s impossible for us not to suspect that homophobic backlash following her public embrace and advocacy of the queer community – something surely intertwined with her close bond to sister Elen, an out lesbian who is positioned in Ellwood’s film as a key pillar of both emotional and artistic support in Lauper’s life – may have had something to do with the mainstream music industry’s ambivalence toward her as she pursued her artistic impulses beyond the flashy appeal of her debut album. 

In any case, “She’s So Unusual,” as a debut album title, proved to be an ironic foreshadowing of the very reasons she was unable to “stay in her own lane” well enough to remain in the good graces of a public (or, perhaps more truthfully, of record executives) that only wanted more of the same. Lauper has never been one to conform, and it’s made her vulnerable, like so many other unrelenting female voices both before and after her, to the mainstream insistence on reinforcement of the comfortable over the breaking down of boundaries.

“Let the Canary Sing” captures all of this succinctly, yet with layered and sophisticated nuance, as it pays its tribute to a pop icon whose seminal work has continued to resonate after more than 40 years. Unavoidably, perhaps, it sometimes feels like a “Behind the Music” episode or a “puff piece” for an artist about to launch a new project – indeed, Lauper announced a “farewell tour” of 23 cities, as well as a “companion piece” greatest hits album release, on the eve of the movie’s streaming debut – but it pushes past such irrelevant comparisons thanks to the palpable sincerity conveyed onscreen, not only from her, but from all the people in her orbit whose comments about her are included in the film.

Of course, it must be said that anyone who’s not a “Cyndi Lauper fan”, whether by virtue of generational gaps or personal tastes, will probably not be drawn to watch a filmic love letter to her, and that’s a shame. It (and she) has the power to make viewers into true believers not only in her talent, but in her message of acceptance, inclusion, and unconditional love. Part of that, hinges on Ellwood’s skill as a filmmaker and teller of real-life stories, but the lasting impact rests on the persona of the star herself, who exudes a genuine air of transcendence and makes us not only feel instantly comfortable, but completely “seen” and validated, no matter who we are or which spectrum we might be on.

It’s hard to fake the kind of sincerity that makes that possible, and nothing about “Canary” suggests that Cyndi Lauper has any interest in being fake, anyway.

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Celebrity News

Flipping the Script: Chris Colfer on his new book & LGBTQ+ Pride

Actor Chris Colfer, speaks to NBC News’ Joe Fryer about his latest book, & the importance of LGBTQ+ representation in books and media

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Chris Colfer speaks about his new book and LGBTQ+ representation. (Screenshot/YouTube NBC News)

(NBC News) NEW YORK – Actor Chris Colfer, known for his starring role as Kurt Hummel on “Glee”, speaks to NBC News’ Joe Fryer about his latest book, “Roswell Johnson Saves The World!” and the importance of LGBTQ+ representation in books and media.

Watch:

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Celebrity News

Far-right publication attacks Dolly Parton over her LGBTQ allyship

“There is nothing that exemplifies how desperate for attention & unhinged the far right has become than this attack on America’s sweetheart”

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Country Icon and superstar singer-songwriter Dolly Parton, chats with Hunter Kelly, the host of PROUD Radio on Apple Music Country featuring music and interviews with LGBTQ country artists and allies last December. (Screenshot/YouTube Hunter Kelly)

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. – In an article published Thursday in the far-right anti-LGBTQ+ online magazine The Federalist, Indianapolis-based freelance writer Ericka Andersen, who self identifies as a Christian mom and Bible study leader, attacks Country Music icon and megastar singer-songwriter Dolly Parton.

Parton, a long time ally of America’s LGBTQ+ community, was taken to task by Andersen who wrote:

“In a world where division is the default, she collects fans of every political stripe, refusing to denigrate anyone, and regularly proclaims, “I love everybody,” when asked how she does it. 

This response is usually seen as a nod toward the LGBT alliance during interviews with media folks forever fixated on this particular group.”

Andersen then notes:

“When asked about her diverse community of fans, Parton always mentions Christianity, saying she does her best “not to judge” and only “to love” for that reason. 

But Parton’s version of love, which includes condoning immoral sexual behavior (“be who you are,” she’s said), is unaligned with God’s vision for humanity. Like so many secularized spiritual leaders, Parton equates love with agreement, but the two are not reciprocal. Love doesn’t mean we must accept sinfulness as good to avoid hurting someone’s feelings.”

When the magazine promoted Andersen’s piece on X (formerly Twitter) it amplified her homo/trans phobias.

 

Paul Richmond, a Monterey, California-based queer artist and art instructor, who is an acquaintance of the singer and has created a couple of artwork pieces for Parton, was asked by the Blade for his reaction to the homophobic parsing of Parton’s character by the Federalist writer.

Richmond said: “There is nothing that exemplifies how desperate for attention and unhinged the far right has become than by this attack on America’s sweetheart. Dolly has always shown kindness and empathy for others, which is what all supposed Christians should be striving for.”

A sampling of reaction on social media platforms from other Parton supporters generally echoed Richmond’s reaction:

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Celebrity News

Madonna pays tribute to the queer community for Pride 2024

Pop Diva and superstar musical artist Madonna expressed her gratitude to her legions of LGBTQ+ fans in a Pride Month post

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Madonna speaking at the 30th annual GLAAD Media Awards 2019 in New York City. (Screenshot/YouTube GLAAD)

NEW YORK – Taking to her Instagram account on Thursday, June 6, Pop Diva and superstar musical artist Madonna expressed her gratitude to her legions of LGBTQ+ fans. The singer also urged her fans to embrace Pride and their queer identity.

“When Truth or Dare was released in 1991 I had no idea it was going to cause such a stir 🌈🌈🌈 But that could be said of most of the things I do!!
I simply wanted to capture the world. I was living in—and share it with the world.
I am forever grateful to the gay community that has always supported me from day one!!!
When I arrived in New York for the first time in 1979 — They made an awkward girl from Michigan feel like she fit in, like she wasn’t a freak and. That it was OK to be different. I am forever indebted.
In this increasingly chaotic world, we are living in. I will never stop fighting for diversity, inclusiveness and equal rights for all!!!

DON’T HIDE YOUR PRIDE! 🏳️‍🌈!
Let’s celebrate this month and every month ! 🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈.”

The American singer and actress has long been recognized as a LGBTQ+ icon.

According to her biographical entry in Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, Madonna was introduced to the gay community while still a teenager growing up in first Pontiac and then later Rochester Hills, north of Detroit, Michigan.

It was her ballet teacher, Christopher Flynn, a gay man, who first told her that she had something to offer the world. He also introduced her to the local gay community of Detroit, Michigan, often taking her to local gay bars and discotheques.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Madonna began as one of the first “notable” names in the entertainment industry to publicly advocate in response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the 1980s.

More recently the singer was honored at the annual GLAAD Media Awards in 1991 for ‘Raising Gay Awareness’ and again in 2019 as an ‘Advocate for Change’. 

Read her entire biographical entry here: (Link)

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Celebrity News

Oprah sends a message to the LGBTQ+ community for Pride

“I wish for you the continued freedom to rise to your truest, highest expression of yourself as a human being”

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In her Instagram Pride post, Oprah Winfrey posted a Pride Month tribute to her gay brother, Jeffrey Lee who passed away in 1989 from AIDS. (Screenshot/Instagram)

MONTECITO, Calif. – Entertainment mogul and longtime LGBTQ+ ally Oprah Winfrey posted an affirming Pride Month message Tuesday to her Instagram, honoring her brother Jeffrey Lee, who died 35 years ago from complications of AIDS.

The 2024 GLAAD Vanguard award winner noted:

“It was 35 years ago that my younger brother, Jeffrey Lee, died from AIDS,” she said in an Instagram video. “He was 29 years old. The year was 1989, and the world was an extremely cruel place, not just for people suffering from AIDS, but also for LGBTQ people in general.”

“I often think if he’d lived, he’d be so amazed at how much the world has changed, that there actually is gay marriage and a Pride Month,” she noted. “How different his life might have been had he lived in these times. In a world that saw and appreciated him for who he was rather than attempting to shame him for his sexuality.”

Winfrey additionally added that everyone should have the right to “love who they want to love and be the person they most want to be.”

“I wish for you the continued freedom to rise to the truest, highest expression of yourself as a human being,” she said.

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Online/Digital Streaming Media

Groundbreaking Japanese romance reality series ‘The Boyfriend’ 

What relationships will develop after a summer together? The new Netflix series ‘The Boyfriend’ streams on July 9

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The Boyfriend streams on July 9, only on Netflix. (Courtesy of Netflix Japan)

TOKYO, Japan – Blazing a fresh trail in the reality dating genre, The Boyfriend, Japan’s first same-sex romance reality series, celebrates love in all its forms. Starting July 9, Netflix viewers can tune in every Tuesday to enjoy a total of 10 episodes in four weekly installments.

Located by the sea, the “Green Room” beach house sets the stage for nine men to find love. For a month, they live together and take turns working shifts at a peppermint green coffee truck, forging deep friendships and learning about themselves along the way. Hosted by an eclectic mix of personalities including MEGUMI, Chiaki Horan, Thelma Aoyama, drag queen Durian Lollobrigida and Yoshimi Tokui, the show promises to deliver a rollercoaster of emotions.

Executive producer Dai Ota, manager of live-action originals at Netflix Japan, shares the vision for the series, explaining, “We started out wanting to highlight the young men’s friendships and personalities. Our focus wasn’t just on romance but also on spending time together and experiencing personal growth.” 

Kyodo Television’s Keisuke Hishida (Ainori Love Wagon: Asian JourneyLove Deadline), who serves as the chief producer and director, adds, “I discussed with the cast how growth and valuable experiences stem from shared friendships, youth and struggles, not just romance. This led to many unexpected miracles on set.”

Graphic Courtesy of Netflix Japan

Model, DJ and YouTube vlogger Taiki takes on the roles of producer and casting director. On bringing the charismatic group together, he says, “I’m so happy with how this series took shape. I listened to each participant with a goal to produce a show that left everyone feeling valued and loved.”

The series debuts a heartwarming teaser trailer featuring the song “Dazed & Confused” by Korean indie rock band Glen Check. Three teaser posters, including one illustrated piece by Korean artist Son Eunkyoung, are also released.

What relationships will develop after a summer together? The Boyfriend streams on July 9, only on Netflix.

Watch the teaser trailer:

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