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‘There’s no place like home,’ The Ariadne Getty Foundation Senior Housing

“This is probably the most important home I’ve ever had- My new home is my sanctuary. It is safety. It is my place of peace”

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Ariadne Getty (Photo courtesy of Ariadne Getty)

LOS ANGELES – The impact of a philanthropist’s work on a community may often be felt although the public at large may not actually be informed on the character of that person sometimes mistaking the physical recognition such as naming rights on buildings as ego driven.

This simple truth is hardly applicable to the Ariadne Getty Foundation’s founder and namesake, Ariadne Getty, as her work is not driven by ego, instead an unyielding devotion to community.

In Los Angeles the Getty family name can be found in public spaces that enhance the culture and education of Angelenos, the two most notable being the J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center and the Getty Research Institute Library.

At LA’s central library one of the largest exhibition spaces carries the family’s name.

Ariadne Getty’s significant philanthropic efforts however, are more focused on a marginalised community and aren’t comprised of a grouping of public spaces adorned with plaques. This quiet unassuming mother of two instead prefers to direct efforts into funding organizations that directly benefit the LGBTQ+ community.

Her foundation has been underwriting the efforts of the Los Angeles LGBT Center and GLAAD. Getty joined the board of directors of the latter in 2016 and on Feb 1, 2018 at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Getty pledged $15 million to the organization, which focuses on media and increasing the visibility and acceptance of the LGBTQ community.

Getty is the mother of two twenty-something children who are members of the LGBTQ+ community and is the mother-in-law to a high profile Trans social media influencer who is married to one of her kids. While naturally focused on the younger set as a result, she also has deep compassion for LGBTQ+ seniors telling journalist Karen Ocamb in an interview this past January;

I’m particularly excited about the seniors,” Getty says. “My heart goes out to them so much because they’ve lost lots of their friends and they’re lonely and the Center [LA-LGBT] provides such a hub of activity. And I love the fact that we’re going to be joining the youth with the seniors, because the seniors will be able to educate the youth about really the history and the hardships of getting to where we are today, where we still have so far to go. But this is a far cry from being gay in the ’40s or the ’50s — let alone during the ’80s with AIDS. I think people, as they get older, get afraid of new things like technology and I think that the youth can help the seniors with just staying up to date and feeling a part of that side. That’s definitely the thing that makes me the happiest: they’re in a Center where they’re surrounded by people. There’s no room for loneliness.”

Getty had a dream. “My goal has always been that I’ll be somebody that would give to community, to be a part of philanthropy on a larger scale,” she told Ocamb. “It’s been many years that I’ve known that — I can’t shy away from the question completely — that I would inherit money. And the first thing that I did was set up the foundation and that’s become my passion.” 

The Ariadne Getty Foundation Senior Housing is a result of Getty’s focus. Located on the LA LGBT Center’s Anita May Rosenstein Campus off Santa Monica Blvd. in Hollywood, the 70,000-square-foot building has 98 affordable housing units for seniors ages 62 and above. It also has a series of large common spaces and interconnected courtyards and areas for its residents tied to the larger Rosenstein campus. While the building bears the Getty name, the focus very much reflects the spirit of her ambition to offer a secure and communal safe space for LGBTQ+ seniors.

The lack of affordable housing in this country is at an all-time high and presents even greater hardships for the LGBTQ community given the many biases which continue to exist. It’s an even greater problem amongst LGBTQ seniors,” Getty told journalist Greg Hernandez in a Blade interview conducted in March of 2020.

Getty’s assertion that a lack of housing presents greater hardship for LGBTQ+ seniors has been backed by studies released by the Williams Institute on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Law and Public Policy at the UCLA School of Law and in a study that showed LGBTQ+ people are being left out of generational wealth for many reasons including family rejection, systematic barriers and a lack of financial education.

With almost half of LGBTQ+ adults saying they have been excluded by a family member or close friend as a result of their sexual orientation or gender identity, according to a study by the Pew Research Center, a lack of familial financial support is a common problem for many in the community.

It is that disconnect from family or death of a partner or spouse that leaves a substantial portion of LGBTQ+ seniors alone. Many of them at risk for homelessness which has reached epic crisis levels in Los Angeles.

An estimated 65,000 LGBTQ seniors live in Los Angeles—68 percent of whom live alone. Many struggle to afford housing and other necessities. They are four times less likely than their heterosexual counterparts to have children and grandchildren to support them and twice as likely to live alone.

These factors were reflected in the high demand during the application process to become a potential resident of the Getty Foundation/LA Center Senior Housing two years ago.

Courtesy of the LA LGBT Center

On Tuesday the formal dedication in a press-only event culminated the years-long process that opened the Senior Housing, celebrating the latest resource for the community. The process though had also been very much affected by the coronavirus pandemic. Prior to the Tuesday event, the in-house communications team at the LA LGBT Center interviewed Getty.

The Ariadne Getty Foundation Senior Center is the “cherry on the top” which completes the Center’s dream of building an intergenerational campus—congratulations! How do you feel knowing that the Senior Center is finally open, particularly when we experienced delays due to the pandemic?

I’m feeling a big sigh of relief knowing there are more LGBTQ seniors who finally have the housing and care they need and deserve. For decades, LGBTQ seniors have been on the frontlines advocating for equality. Without the progress they achieved and their personal sacrifices, the LGBTQ community would not have the same rights it does today. Covid-19 has been incredibly challenging, but even before the pandemic, LGBTQ seniors faced disproportionate rates of homelessness,” Getty answered.

Unfortunately, the pandemic deepened disparities, making the The Los Angeles LGBT Center’s The Ariadne Getty Foundation Senior Center an urgent need not only for the Los Angeles community, but as an example and inspiration for communities nationwide. It’s only right that we meet this urgent need and repay their decades of hardships with the services LGBTQ seniors need to live and age with dignity and respect. The Senior Center is another step towards achieving that goal and ensuring that the most vulnerable seniors receive the care they deserve.”

In an email to the Blade, Getty’s children Nats and August Getty expressed their admiration and support for their mother’s charitable work as now physically evident with the completion of the Senior Housing.

“We couldn’t be prouder to have a mom who cares so deeply for the LGBTQ community. Since we came out as queer, our mom and her foundation, The Ariadne Getty Foundation’s commitment to LGBTQ equality has only deepened – and the new Los Angeles LGBT Senior Center’s Ariadne Getty Foundation Senior Housing is a standing tribute to that commitment.  Because of her advocacy and philanthropy, she has helped create a home where LGBTQ seniors can live and age with dignity and respect.

As out-queer, young adults, our ability to be our authentic selves comes on the back of the tireless advocacy of LGBTQ elders. It is only right that these seniors receive the care and support they deserve. We are thankful our mom has helped make that a reality.” 

In addition to Getty’s foundation, the Senior Housing received support from investors and government agencies, including the City of Los Angeles; Los Angeles County; City of West Hollywood; State of California; California Community Reinvestment Corporation; Federal Home Loan Bank of California; and Wells Fargo Bank.

Courtesy of the LA LGBT Center

Also partnering was property management company Thomas Safran & Associates. In a phone interview Tuesday, the company’s President Jordan Pynes told the Blade that community was the primary focus that was incorporated into every aspect of the design. From the physical layout to the interconnectivity with the center’s main campus, every element was purpose driven to make sure that residents had the ability to mingle and build that sense of community.

Joining in the interview call, Kevin Napoli, co-founder of the LENA Group, Inc. told the Blade that all the elements of the design were based on the larger campus, but stressed that the focus was on the interconnected courtyards and common spaces. The effect to engender interactions between all members of the center’s community and the seniors.

Senior Housing residents will have access to the full range of wraparound services and support provided by the Center, including case management; home-delivered meals; in-home care and benefits assistance; connection to health and mental health care; HIV support and wellness; counseling and support groups; and more than 100 monthly activities and events provided for free or at low-cost.

“We are immensely proud to finally open the doors of The Ariadne Getty Foundation Senior Housing following months of construction interruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic—but the wait was worth it,” said LA LGBT Center CEO Lorri L. Jean. “Just in time for Thanksgiving and the upcoming holidays, our residents can celebrate with each other in a safe, warm environment where they are able to live freely and fearlessly as their authentic selves. We have many reasons to be grateful this year, and are particularly thankful for Ariadne Getty, her foundation, and our affordable housing developer partner Thomas Safran & Associates, who stepped up to work with us to improve the lives of many low-income seniors!”

This is probably the most important home I’ve ever had,” said new resident Lisa Chilton. “For 10 years, whether it was renting a room or sleeping on various sofas, I had been in many other people’s space, trying to stay small, and following their schedules. My new home is my sanctuary. It is safety. It is my place of peace.”

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Los Angeles

Los Angeles Mayor: Supreme Court decision “fundamentally un-American”

Mayor Eric Garcetti spoke to the Los Angeles Blade reflecting on Friday’s U.S. Supreme Court reversal of Roe v. Wade

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Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti (Blade photo from video by Troy Masters)

LOS ANGELES – During the Los Angeles Mayor’s Pride Garden Party held at The Getty House, the official residence of the mayor Saturday afternoon, Mayor Eric Garcetti spoke to the Los Angeles Blade reflecting on Friday’s U.S. Supreme Court reversal of Roe v. Wade.

Garcetti noted that “here in LA we defend those rights” after taking aim at the actions of the high court Friday in the ruling on the Mississippi case of Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health clinic. “Make no mistake, we have to be active,” Garcetti added.

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Los Angeles

Reminder: 101 closed through DTLA until 10pm Sunday

The closure began at 10 p.m. Saturday and will be completed by 10 p.m. Sunday, the Los Angeles Bureau of Engineering announced

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Photo Credit: County of Los Angeles

LOS ANGELES – (KTLA) Motorists are being reminded that the stretch of 101 through the downtown area of Los Angeles is shut down for road restoration and reconstruction work.

KTLA reported the closure began at 10 p.m. Saturday and will be completed by 10 p.m. Sunday, the Los Angeles Bureau of Engineering announced.

The 24-hour closure between State Route 60 and the 10 Freeway interchange is needed for the Sixth Street Viaduct Replacement Project, which aims to replace the original, seismically-deficient structure built in 1932, authorities said.

During the closure, the California Department of Transportation will also be doing slab replacement work along the same stretch of the 101 Freeway.

The closure will center around the east side of the viaduct construction site in Boyle Heights. While the stretch is closed, drivers headed west on State Route 60 from the Pomona area will not be able to access the 101, officials said.

Off-ramps and on-ramps in the area will also be closed during as road work gets underway.

Drivers who reach the closure will see signs directing them to a detour.

(The City of Los Angeles Bureau of Engineering)

The new $588 million viaduct is expected to be completed in Summer of 2022, stretching between Boyle Heights and the Arts District.

Officials say it is the largest bridge project in the history of Los Angeles.

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Los Angeles

LA-DWP & Mayor Garcetti announce new outdoor watering restrictions

Sprinkler watering will be allowed Monday & Friday at odd-numbered addresses in the city, and even-numbered addresses on Thursday & Sunday

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City of Los Angeles (Blade file photo)

LOS ANGELES – In a press conference Tuesday Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and officials from the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) announced that outdoor watering in the city will be restricted to two days a week starting June 1.

The announcement comes as the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California declared an unprecedented water shortage emergency two weeks ago, imposing restrictions after MWD’s board voted to adopt the emergency measures to “reduce non-essential water use” in certain areas. Cities and smaller water suppliers that get water from MWD are required to start restricting outdoor watering to one day a week, or to find other ways to cut usage to a new monthly allocation limit.

LADWP

In Tuesday’s press conference Mayor Garcetti said L.A.’s two-day limit was still more lenient than the one imposed by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, which has ordered many of its member agencies to restrict outdoor watering to once a week.

Sprinkler watering will be allowed on Monday and Friday at odd-numbered addresses in the city, and even-numbered addresses on Thursday and Sunday.

For more information visit the LADWP webpage here.

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